[Rev. 12/2/2016 4:13:45 PM]

 

This chapter of NAC has changes which have been adopted but have not been codified; you can see those changes by viewing the following regulation(s) on the Nevada Register of Administrative Regulations: R050-16

[NAC-389 Revised Date: 6-16]

CHAPTER 389 - EXAMINATIONS, COURSES, STANDARDS AND DIPLOMAS

GENERAL PROVISIONS

389.011              Definitions.

389.015              “Adjusted diploma” defined.

389.017              “Adult standard diploma” defined.

389.018              “Aesthetic position” defined.

389.0195            “Criterion-referenced examination” defined.

389.020              “Demonstrate” defined.

389.021              “Dramatized event” defined.

389.022              “Dramatized idea or story” defined.

389.024              “Elements of music” defined.

389.0242            “End-of-course examination” defined.

389.0246            “Graduating cohort” defined.

389.028              “Historical periods” defined.

389.029              “Information literate” defined.

389.030              “Level of musical difficulty” defined.

389.034              “Semester” defined.

389.035              “Standard diploma” defined.

389.0355            “The arts” defined.

389.036              “Trimester” defined.

389.040              “Unit of credit” defined.

389.042              “Visual arts” defined.

389.043              “Visual characteristics” defined.

389.046              “World language” defined.

ADMINISTRATION OF ACHIEVEMENT AND END-OF-COURSE EXAMINATIONS AND COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS ASSESSMENTS

389.0482            Eligibility of pupil to take end-of-course examination.

389.0484            Eligibility of pupil to take college and career readiness assessment.

389.051              Times for administration; special administration.

389.0515            General requirements for examinations.

389.054              Confidentiality and security of testing materials.

389.056              Procedures for administration.

389.0565            Use of calculators on examinations.

389.057              Eligibility for reexamination.

389.0574            School district to provide remedial study to pupil who fails end-of-course examination; plan to provide remedial study to be provided to Department; review and approval of plan; times remedial study to be offered.

389.0576            Charter school to provide remedial study to pupil who fails end-of-course examination; plan to provide remedial study to be provided to sponsor; review and approval of plan; times remedial study to be offered.

389.058              Reporting of results to Department.

389.059              Restriction on reporting scores of individual pupils; reporting of aggregated scores.

389.061              Specific criterion-referenced examinations required.

389.071              Proficiency examinations in writing: High school; fifth and eighth grades.

389.083              Maintenance of results of examinations and list of names and scores.

KINDERGARTEN THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL

389.167              World language at the novice-mid proficiency level.

389.169              World language at the novice-high proficiency level.

389.171              World language at the intermediate-low proficiency level.

389.173              World language at the intermediate-mid proficiency level.

389.177              World language at the intermediate-high proficiency level.

389.179              World language at the advanced-low proficiency level.

389.181              World language at the advanced-mid proficiency level.

389.183              World language at the advanced-high proficiency level.

389.187              Academic, career, and personal and social development.

PREKINDERGARTEN, ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, MIDDLE SCHOOL AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Prescribed Courses

389.195              Elementary school.

Instruction: Prekindergarten Through Second Grade

389.232              Kindergarten: Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.237              Kindergarten: Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.238              Kindergarten: Social studies.

389.239              Kindergarten: Science.

389.2418            First grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.24195          First grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.2421            First grade: Social studies.

389.2423            Prekindergarten through second grade: Health.

389.2424            Kindergarten through second grade: Technology and computers.

389.24245          First grade: Science.

389.2425            Second grade: Physical education.

389.2431            Second grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.2433            Second grade: Information literacy.

389.2436            Second grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.2437            Second grade: Social studies.

389.244              Second grade: Science.

Instruction: Third Grade

389.247              Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.248              Information literacy.

389.252              Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.254              Social studies.

389.272              The arts.

389.284              Science.

Instruction: Fourth Grade

389.2931            Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.2932            Information literacy.

389.2933            Social studies.

389.2935            Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.2936            Science.

Instruction Through Fifth Grade

389.2938            Third through fifth grades: Health.

389.2939            Fifth grade: Science.

389.29415          Fifth grade: Information literacy.

389.2942            Fifth grade: Social studies.

389.29425          Fifth grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.29435          Fifth grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.2946            Third through fifth grades: Physical education.

389.2948            Fifth grade: Technology and computers.

389.2949            Fifth grade: The arts.

Instruction: Sixth Through Eighth Grades

389.2985            Sixth grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.299              Sixth grade: Information literacy.

389.302              Sixth grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.322              Seventh grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.324              Seventh grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.372              Sixth through eighth grades: Social studies.

389.381              Sixth through eighth grades: Health.

389.386              Sixth through eighth grades: Physical education.

389.3905            Eighth grade: Technology and computers.

389.391              Eighth grade: Introduction to technology.

389.393              Eighth grade: Home and career skills.

389.395              Seventh and eighth grades: Required courses where subjects taught by different teachers.

389.402              Eighth grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.407              Eighth grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics.

389.411              Sixth through eighth grades: Science.

Elective Courses of Study

389.443              The arts: Instruction in sixth through eighth grades.

Requirements for Promotion to High School

389.445              Required units of credit; pupils with disabilities; pupils who transfer between schools; recognition of certain programs of homeschool study.

HIGH SCHOOL

Required Courses of Study

389.450              Prescribed courses of study for graduation.

389.452              Arts and humanities.

389.455              Health.

389.4612            Common Core Standards for English language arts.

389.4645            Common Core State Standards for mathematics.

389.485              Physical education.

389.488              Exemption from physical education.

389.491              Science: Generally.

389.4915            Science: Standards.

389.505              Technology and computers.

389.511              Social studies.

Elective Courses of Study

389.516              Permissible elective courses of study.

389.541              The arts.

389.551              Business math.

389.555              Employability skills for career readiness.

389.556              Journalism.

389.558              Speech.

389.562              Career and technical education in cooperation with private employer: Contents.

389.564              Career and technical education in cooperation with private employer: Duties of teacher.

389.566              Career and technical education in cooperation with private employer: Duties of employer.

389.568              Drivers’ education.

389.571              American Sign Language: First year.

389.5712            American Sign Language: Second year.

389.5714            American Sign Language: Third year.

389.5716            American Sign Language: Fourth year.

389.644              Skills to obtain employment: Contents.

389.646              Skills to obtain employment: Eligible pupils.

389.648              Skills to obtain employment: Duties of teacher.

389.650              Skills to obtain employment: Duties of participating employer.

389.6533            Introduction to keyboarding.

389.6549            Great Basin Native American language.

Requirements for Promotion to Next Higher Grade Level and Issuance of Diplomas

389.6552            Passage of end-of-course examinations required for diploma to be awarded.

389.658              Submission of results of end-of-course examinations.

389.6585            Publication of standards and passing grades; submission by school districts and charter schools of certain information; review and approval by Department.

389.659              Units of credit or semesters required for promotion to next higher grade level; waiver of certain requirements.

389.6625            Uniform grading scale; computation of grade point average; assignment of value to grade earned by pupil transferring from another state; applicability; policies assigning a plus or minus to grades.

389.663              Units of credit and grade point average required to receive advanced diploma.

389.664              Units of credit required to receive standard diploma.

389.666              Units applicable toward graduation.

389.668              Credit which may be granted in fractional time units.

389.670              Credit granted for performance on examination in lieu of course attendance: Board of trustees required to prescribe application and eligible courses of study; effect of pupil’s withdrawal from school; authority of State Board to review examination and minimum score required.

389.672              Academic credit for a course of study in career and technical education: Limitations and prerequisites.

389.673              Academic credit for courses of study in career and technical education: Periodic review and approval of each course.

389.674              Credit for equivalent experience outside campus or program.

389.676              Credit for sectarian religious courses not allowed.

389.678              Summer school units applicable toward graduation.

389.680              Credit for correspondence courses.

389.682              Requirements for graduation for pupils transferring to Nevada high school.

389.684              Schools prohibited from reducing or reevaluating credits transferred from another school.

389.686              Exemptions for certain high schools from requirements for graduation.

389.688              Requirements for adult standard diploma.

389.690              Credit received through adult high school program applicable toward adult standard diploma.

389.692              Other credits applicable toward adult standard diploma.

389.694              Waiver of credits for adult standard diploma; scores required on high school equivalency assessment for waiver.

389.695              Attendance at adult high school program for test preparation.

389.696              Individualized program of education for pupil with disability.

389.698              Adjusted diploma for pupil with disability.

Miscellaneous Provisions

389.700              Transcript of high school record.

Program of Independent Study

389.710              “Independent study” defined.

389.720              Plan to operate program; approval or denial of plan; written policy; system of recordkeeping.

389.730              Courses allowed; courses outside school district.

389.740              Licensing of instructors; supervision required for certain courses.

389.750              Written agreement with pupil.

Program of Career and Technical Education

389.800              General requirements for program.

389.803              Program areas.

389.805              Duties of Department of Education and school district.

389.810              Establishment and duties of joint technical skills committees and career and technical education councils.

389.815              Requirements for endorsement on diploma indicating successful completion of program.

Public or Private Internships

389.825              Reporting of certain information to State Board; approval and notice.

COLLEGE READINESS

389.830              “College readiness” defined.

389.835              Standards for college readiness.

389.840              Indications of college readiness.

389.845              Scope of college readiness.

VETERANS

389.850              Issuance of standard high school diploma to certain veterans who left high school to serve in Armed Forces.

 

 

GENERAL PROVISIONS

     NAC 389.011  Definitions. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  As used in this chapter, unless the context otherwise requires, the words and terms defined in NAC 389.015 to 389.046, inclusive, have the meanings ascribed to them in those sections.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A 1-26-90; R065-99, 11-3-99; R086-99, 11-3-99, eff. 1-1-2000; R037-99, 11-3-99, eff. 7-1-2000; R073-00, 6-20-2000; R013-03, 10-30-2003; R063-14, 10-24-2014; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.015  “Adjusted diploma” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Adjusted diploma” means a diploma which evidences the graduation from high school of a pupil with a disability after the pupil has met special requirements or adjusted standards.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A by R072-01, 11-7-2001)

     NAC 389.017  “Adult standard diploma” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Adult standard diploma” means a diploma which evidences the graduation from high school of a person who has met the requirements for graduation through:

     1.  An adult high school program established by a school district; or

     2.  An alternative program for the education of pupils at risk of dropping out of school established by a school district pursuant to NRS 388.537.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A by R067-97, 12-10-97; R134-07, 6-17-2008)

     NAC 389.018  “Aesthetic position” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Aesthetic position” means a point of view concerning the nature of the visual arts such as formalism, functionalism, hedonism, expressionism and realism.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.0195  “Criterion-referenced examination” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Criterion-referenced examination” means an examination in which the achievement and proficiency of a pupil on the examination is compared to an expected level of achievement and proficiency on the examination that is based on the specific academic standards, knowledge and skills that the examination was designed to measure.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R065-99, eff. 11-3-99; A by R072-01, 11-7-2001)

     NAC 389.020  “Demonstrate” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Demonstrate” means the ability to define, identify or list the major components of a subject and, if the subject is part of an activity, to perform the activity in accordance with commonly held standards or, when applicable, to standards set by government or industry.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92)

     NAC 389.021  “Dramatized event” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Dramatized event” means a method of telling a story through the use of stage, film, television, radio or computer discs.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.022  “Dramatized idea or story” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Dramatized idea or story” means a method of communicating an idea or telling a story through a variety of theatrical techniques such as pantomime, creative movement, improvisation, creative drama, storytelling, choral reading, story theater, puppetry, readers’ theater, role-playing and theater games.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.024  “Elements of music” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Elements of music” means pitch, rhythm, harmony, dynamics, timbre, texture and form.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.0242  “End-of-course examination” defined. (NRS 385.080, 389.805)  “End-of-course examination” means an examination required by NRS 389.805 and NAC 389.6552.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R061-14, eff. 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.0246  “Graduating cohort” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Graduating cohort” means a group of pupils who, as of the date on which they begin high school, are scheduled to graduate from high school at the end of a specified school year.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R061-14, eff. 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.028  “Historical periods” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Historical periods” means major points in the history of mankind in which significant contributions to the theater have been made, such as fifth century Greece, the Elizabethan era, the French neoclassic period and the Restoration.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.029  “Information literate” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Information literate” means attaining the literacy level established by NAC 389.2433, 389.248, 389.2932, 389.29415 or 389.299 for the grade level in which a pupil is enrolled.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R013-03, eff. 10-30-2003)

     NAC 389.030  “Level of musical difficulty” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Level of musical difficulty” means a level of difficulty for playing music on a scale with six levels that are more particularly described as follows:

     1.  Level 1 is the “very easy” level and is characterized by the ability of the pupil to perform music that uses easy keys, meters and rhythms, and contains limited ranges.

     2.  Level 2 is the “easy” level and is characterized by the ability of the pupil to perform music that may include changes of tempo, key and meter, and contains modest ranges.

     3.  Level 3 is the “moderately easy” level and is characterized by the ability of the pupil to perform music that contains moderate technical demands, expanded ranges and varied interpretive requirements.

     4.  Level 4 is the “moderately difficult” level and is characterized by the ability of the pupil to perform music that requires well-developed technical skills, attention to phrasing and interpretation, and the ability to perform various meters and rhythms in a variety of keys.

     5.  Level 5 is the “difficult” level and is characterized by the ability of the pupil to perform music that requires advanced technical and interpretive skills, the ability to perform unusual meters, complex rhythms and subtle dynamic requirements, and contains key signatures with numerous sharps and flats.

     6.  Level 6 is the “very difficult” level and is characterized by the ability of the pupil to perform music that is suitable for pupils who are musically mature and of exceptional competence.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.034  “Semester” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Semester” means one of the two academic terms that make up the school year at a school that offers a traditional 9-month school schedule.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R037-99, 11-3-99, eff. 7-1-2000)

     NAC 389.035  “Standard diploma” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Standard diploma” means a diploma which evidences a pupil’s graduation from high school but which is not an adjusted diploma or an adult standard diploma.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82)

     NAC 389.0355  “The arts” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “The arts” means the areas of visual arts, music and theater.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.036  “Trimester” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Trimester” means one of the three academic terms that make up the school year at a school that offers a 12-month school program or a school program involving alternative scheduling whose regular academic year consists of three terms.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R037-99, 11-3-99, eff. 7-1-2000)

     NAC 389.040  “Unit of credit” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Unit of credit” means an amount of credit which is awarded to a pupil for successful completion of a course containing at least 120 hours of instruction or the equivalent.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82)

     NAC 389.042  “Visual arts” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Visual arts” means a broad category of art that includes, without limitation:

     1.  Traditional art such as drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture;

     2.  Communication and design art such as film, television, graphics and production design;

     3.  Architecture and environmental art such as urban, interior and landscape design;

     4.  Folk art; and

     5.  Works in ceramic, fibers, jewelry, wood, paper and other materials.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.043  “Visual characteristics” defined. (NRS 385.080)  “Visual characteristics” means distinguishing traits, qualities or properties that may be seen and identified in a work of visual art.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.046  “World language” defined. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  “World language” means any spoken language other than English.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

ADMINISTRATION OF ACHIEVEMENT AND END-OF-COURSE EXAMINATIONS AND COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS ASSESSMENTS

     NAC 389.0482  Eligibility of pupil to take end-of-course examination. (NRS 385.080, 389.805)  After entering grade 6, a pupil who is enrolled in or has completed each course for which an end-of-course examination is approved pursuant to NAC 389.6585 is eligible to take the examination.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R061-14, eff. 12-22-2014; A by R036-15, 10-27-2015)

     NAC 389.0484  Eligibility of pupil to take college and career readiness assessment. (NRS 385.080, 389.805, 389.807)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 2, a pupil is eligible to take the college and career readiness assessment administered pursuant to NRS 389.807 if the pupil has completed at least 11 units of credit or 4 semesters of high school.

     2.  If a pupil has an academic plan which projects that the pupil will graduate from high school before becoming eligible to take the college and career readiness assessment pursuant to subsection 1, the pupil may submit a written request to take the assessment to the superintendent of schools of the school district or the governing body of the charter school in which the pupil is enrolled.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R061-14, eff. 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.051  Times for administration; special administration. (NRS 385.080, 389.550, 389.805, 389.807)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 2, the board of trustees of each school district and the governing body of each charter school, respectively, shall administer the examinations and assessment required by NRS 389.550, 389.805 and 389.807 in each public school in that district and each charter school which has the appropriate grades. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, the examinations and assessment must be administered in the spring semester on the dates specified by the Department, as follows:

     (a) For grades 3 through 8, the criterion-referenced examinations in reading and mathematics as provided in NAC 389.061.

     (b) For grades 5 and 8, the criterion-referenced examinations in writing and science.

     (c) For pupils in grade 11, the college and career readiness assessment.

     (d) Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph, for pupils who are enrolled in courses for which end-of-course examinations are approved pursuant to NAC 389.6585, those examinations. For any pupil who fails an end-of-course examination, the examination must be administered again to the pupil during the summer months on the dates specified by the Department.

     2.  Not later than May 1 of each year, the board of trustees of a school district in which a school with a 12-month school program is located or the governing body of a charter school with a 12-month school program shall, if pupils who attend the school are not expected to be in session on one of the dates prescribed in subsection 1 for the administration of an examination, consult with the Assessment, Program Accountability and Curriculum Office of the Department to establish another date for the administration of that examination. Not later than June 1 of that year, the Assessment, Program Accountability and Curriculum Office shall provide the board of trustees or the governing body of a charter school with written confirmation of the date agreed upon pursuant to this subsection.

     3.  The Department may schedule a special administration of any examination required to be passed for graduation if:

     (a) The person taking the examination is a pupil enrolled in grade 12;

     (b) The person, through no fault on the part of the person, was not able to take the examination at its most recent administration; and

     (c) No regular administration of the examination is scheduled before the date on which the person is otherwise eligible to graduate.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 3-9-88; A 9-15-89; 9-13-91; 10-8-93, eff. 9-1-94; 11-17-95; R115-97, 12-10-97; R115-97, 12-10-97, eff. 7-1-98; R019-98, 4-17-98; R019-98, 4-17-98, eff. 7-1-98; R065-99, 11-3-99; R065-99, 11-3-99, eff. 9-1-2000; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R072-01, 11-7-2001, eff. 7-1-2002; R042-05, 10-31-2005; R020-09, 10-27-2009; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.0515  General requirements for examinations. (NRS 385.080, 389.550, 389.805)

     1.  An examination that is administered to assess the achievement and proficiency of pupils in this State must:

     (a) If the examination is administered pursuant to NRS 389.550, measure the achievement and proficiency of pupils in the standards of content established by the Council to Establish Academic Standards for Public Schools, as adopted by the State Board of Education pursuant to NRS 389.520;

     (b) If the examination is an end-of-course examination, measure the achievement and proficiency of pupils in the subjects set forth in subsection 1 of NRS 389.018 and NAC 389.6552;

     (c) Be designed so that data relating to past and future trends of the examination scores of pupils may be compiled;

     (d) Measure the specific knowledge and skills or level of achievement and proficiency that it was designed to measure;

     (e) Be fair to all potential examinees and, insofar as practicable, be designed to account for differences among the examinees in their gender, culture and primary language; and

     (f) Be useful in determining the achievement and proficiency of a pupil relative to a particular level of achievement and proficiency.

     2.  The costs of such an examination must not exceed the appropriations made by the Legislature for the administration of the examination.

     3.  The results of such an examination must be reported in a manner that:

     (a) Is clear to parents and teachers; and

     (b) Avoids the use of technical terms.

     4.  The Department shall provide a program of professional development for teachers relating to the interpretation of the results of such an examination.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R065-99, eff. 11-3-99; A by R072-01, 11-7-2001; R072-01, 11-7-2001, eff. 7-1-2002; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.054  Confidentiality and security of testing materials. (NRS 385.080, 389.550, 389.616, 389.805)

     1.  The questions contained in any end-of-course examination and the approved answers used for grading the examination are confidential, and disclosure is unlawful except:

     (a) To the extent necessary to administer and evaluate the examination.

     (b) To the extent necessary for the performance of the duties of a person described in this paragraph, disclosure may be made to a:

          (1) State officer who is a member of the Executive or Legislative Branch of State Government; or

          (2) Superintendent of schools, director of curriculum or director of testing of a school district.

     (c) Specific questions and answers may be disclosed if the Superintendent of Public Instruction determines that the questions and answers are not being used in a current examination and that making the questions and answers available to the public poses no threat to the security of the examination process.

     (d) As required pursuant to NRS 239.0115.

     2.  The board of trustees of each school district and the governing body of each charter school shall ensure that the employees of the school district or charter school, respectively, who have access to the materials necessary to administer the examinations required by NRS 389.550 and 389.805 are familiar with:

     (a) The provisions of this section and NRS 389.600 to 389.648, inclusive; and

     (b) Any instructions that are issued by the Department relating to the confidentiality of those materials.

     3.  Except as otherwise provided in this section, a person shall not make or distribute copies of the questions contained in the examinations required by NRS 389.550 and 389.805 or the approved answers used for grading them unless that person has received written authorization to do so from the publisher of the examination and the Department.

     4.  Before the examinations required by NRS 389.550 and 389.805 are distributed to the schools in which the examinations will be administered, the board of trustees or the governing body shall ensure that the materials used to administer the examinations and the approved answers used for grading them are stored in such a manner that only those persons to whom the materials and answers may be disclosed pursuant to this section have access to them.

     5.  The secure examination materials that are used to administer the examinations required by NRS 389.550 and 389.805 must not be distributed to the schools in which the examinations will be administered until such time as is necessary to allow the schools adequate time to prepare to administer the examinations.

     6.  The principal of each school to which an examination is delivered shall ensure that:

     (a) The questions contained in the examination are stored in a secure location and are not distributed until the examination is administered; and

     (b) The materials used to administer the examination are stored in a secure manner before the end of the day on which the examination is administered.

     7.  On or before September 15 of each year, the principal of each public school and charter school, respectively, shall submit to the Department a statement that the principal will ensure that the school complies with the provisions of this section, the provisions of NRS 389.600 to 389.648, inclusive, and any instructions issued by the Department relating to the confidentiality of testing materials. The statement required pursuant to this subsection must be on a form prescribed by the Department.

     8.  The examinations required by NRS 389.550 and 389.805 must be administered:

     (a) In a facility that is approved by the board of trustees of the school district or the governing body of the charter school; and

     (b) By employees of the school district or charter school who are designated to administer the examinations by the board of trustees of the school district or the governing body of the charter school, respectively.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R115-97, eff. 12-10-97; A by R065-99, 11-3-99; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.056  Procedures for administration. (NRS 385.080, 389.550, 389.805, 389.807)

     1.  Achievement and proficiency examinations must be administered as follows:

     (a) For grades 5 and 8, the examination in writing must be administered pursuant to the instructions in the current edition of the manual for the administration of the proficiency examination in writing adopted by the Department.

     (b) For grades 3 through 8, the criterion-referenced examinations must be administered pursuant to the instructions in the current edition of the manual for the administration of the criterion-referenced examinations adopted by the Department.

     2.  The college and career readiness assessment required by NRS 389.807 and end-of-course examinations must be administered pursuant to the instructions in the current edition of the manual for the administration of the criterion-referenced examinations adopted by the Department.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 3-9-88; A 9-15-89; 12-11-89; 9-13-91; 10-8-93, eff. 9-1-94; 11-17-95; R115-97, 12-10-97; R019-98, 4-17-98; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R042-05, 10-31-2005; R020-09, 10-27-2009; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.0565  Use of calculators on examinations. (NRS 385.080, 389.550)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided in this section, calculators may not be used by pupils taking any examination in mathematics described in NAC 389.061.

     2.  A pupil may use a calculator while taking the Nevada Criterion-Referenced Examination in Mathematics if the pupil is enrolled in a program of special education pursuant to NRS 388.440 to 388.520, inclusive, and the pupil’s individualized education program specifies that the pupil may use a calculator for assessment purposes.

     3.  A pupil may use a calculator while taking a portion of the Nevada Criterion-Referenced Examination in Mathematics if the Department has specified that a calculator may be used while taking that portion of the examination.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R115-97, eff. 12-10-97; A by R019-98, 4-17-98; R065-99, 11-3-99; R065-99, 11-3-99, eff. 9-1-2000; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R042-05, 10-31-2005; R020-09, 10-27-2009; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.057  Eligibility for reexamination. (NRS 385.080, 389.550, 389.805)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 2, a pupil who fails an end-of-course examination is eligible to be reexamined only at the times the examination is administered pursuant to NAC 389.051 after providing proof to the school district or, if the pupil attends a charter school, to the charter school that the pupil has completed the appropriate remedial study.

     2.  If the pupil does not pass an end-of-course examination before the completion of grade 12, the pupil may be reexamined any time that the examination is administered to adults pursuant to NAC 389.051 after providing proof to the school district or, if the pupil attends a charter school, to the charter school that the pupil has completed the appropriate remedial study.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 10-8-93; A by R065-99, 11-3-99; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R020-09, 10-27-2009; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.0574  School district to provide remedial study to pupil who fails end-of-course examination; plan to provide remedial study to be provided to Department; review and approval of plan; times remedial study to be offered. (NRS 385.080, 389.805)

     1.  Each school district shall provide remedial study to each pupil enrolled in a public school in the district who fails an end-of-course examination.

     2.  Each school district shall develop a plan to provide the remedial study described in subsection 1. The plan must prescribe an appropriate amount of remedial study, as determined by the teacher of the course with which the examination is aligned, the public school, or both, for each end-of-course examination.

     3.  Not later than July 1, each school district shall submit to the Department the plan developed pursuant to subsection 2.

     4.  Not later than 45 days after the Department receives a plan submitted pursuant to subsection 3 or resubmitted pursuant to subsection 5, the Department will review the plan and:

     (a) Approve the plan and provide notice to the school district that the plan is approved; or

     (b) Return the plan to the school district with recommendations for revision.

     5.  If the Department returns a plan to a school district pursuant to paragraph (b) of subsection 4, the school district shall, within 20 days after it receives the plan, revise and resubmit the plan to the Department. A plan may be revised and resubmitted until it is approved.

     6.  A school district shall not charge a pupil for any of the costs related to the remedial study, including, without limitation, costs relating to transporting the pupil to the location where the remedial study is provided.

     7.  The remedial study described in subsection 1 may be offered:

     (a) During the regular school day;

     (b) During summer school;

     (c) During intersession school; or

     (d) As part of a program that is offered before or after the regular school day.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R061-14, eff. 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.0576  Charter school to provide remedial study to pupil who fails end-of-course examination; plan to provide remedial study to be provided to sponsor; review and approval of plan; times remedial study to be offered. (NRS 385.080, 389.805)

     1.  Each charter school shall provide remedial study to each pupil enrolled in the charter school who fails an end-of-course examination.

     2.  The governing body of each charter school shall develop a plan to provide the remedial study described in subsection 1. The plan must prescribe an appropriate amount of remedial study, as determined by the teacher of the course with which the examination is aligned, the governing body of the charter school, or both, for each end-of-course examination.

     3.  Not later than July 1, the governing body of each charter school shall submit to the sponsor of the charter school the plan developed pursuant to subsection 2.

     4.  Not later than 45 days after a sponsor of the charter school receives a plan submitted pursuant to subsection 3 or resubmitted pursuant to subsection 5, the sponsor shall review the plan and:

     (a) Approve the plan and provide notice to the governing body of the charter school that the plan is approved; or

     (b) Return the plan to the governing body of the charter school with recommendations for revision.

     5.  If the sponsor of a charter school returns a plan to the governing body of the charter school pursuant to paragraph (b) of subsection 4, the governing body shall, within 20 days after it receives the plan, revise and resubmit the plan to the sponsor of the charter school. A plan may be revised and resubmitted until it is approved.

     6.  A charter school shall not charge a pupil for any of the costs related to the remedial study, including, without limitation, costs relating to transporting the pupil to the location where the remedial study is provided.

     7.  The remedial study described in subsection 1 may be offered:

     (a) During the regular school day;

     (b) During summer school;

     (c) During intersession school; or

     (d) As part of a program offered before or after the regular school day.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R061-14, eff. 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.058  Reporting of results to Department. (NRS 385.080, 389.550, 389.805)  A private entity that has contracted with the State Board to score an examination administered pursuant to NRS 389.550 or 389.805 shall report the results of the examination in writing to the Department.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 9-15-89; A 12-11-89; 9-13-91; 10-8-93, eff. 9-1-94; R115-97, 12-10-97; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R042-05, 10-31-2005; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.059  Restriction on reporting scores of individual pupils; reporting of aggregated scores. (NRS 385.080, 389.550, 389.805)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided by a specific statute or regulation, the Department shall not report the scores achieved by an individual pupil on an examination required by NRS 389.550 or 389.805 to a person or governmental agency.

     2.  The Department may report the aggregated scores of 10 or more pupils.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 9-13-91; A by R065-99, 11-3-99; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R059-04, 8-25-2004; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.061  Specific criterion-referenced examinations required. (NRS 385.080, 389.550)  The following criterion-referenced examinations must be used as examinations of achievement and proficiency:

     1.  For grade 3, the criterion-referenced examinations that must be used are the Nevada Criterion-Referenced Examinations in Mathematics and Reading prescribed by the Department for each testing period. Each edition of those examinations must be based upon the standards of content and performance adopted pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     2.  For grade 4, the criterion-referenced examinations that must be used are the Nevada Criterion-Referenced Examinations in Mathematics and Reading prescribed by the Department for each testing period. Each edition of those examinations must be based upon the standards of content and performance adopted pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     3.  For grade 5, the criterion-referenced examinations that must be used are:

     (a) The Nevada Fifth Grade Proficiency Examination in Writing prescribed by the Department for each testing period; and

     (b) The Nevada Criterion-Referenced Examinations in Mathematics, Reading and Science prescribed by the Department for each testing period. Each edition of those examinations must be based upon the standards of content and performance adopted pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     4.  For grade 6, the criterion-referenced examinations that must be used are the Nevada Criterion-Referenced Examinations in Mathematics and Reading prescribed by the Department for each testing period. Each edition of those examinations must be based upon the standards of content and performance adopted pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     5.  For grade 7, the criterion-referenced examinations that must be used are the Nevada Criterion-Referenced Examinations in Mathematics and Reading prescribed by the Department for each testing period. Each edition of those examinations must be based upon the standards of content and performance adopted pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     6.  For grade 8, the criterion-referenced examinations that must be used are:

     (a) The Nevada Eighth Grade Proficiency Examination in Writing prescribed by the Department for each testing period; and

     (b) The Nevada Criterion-Referenced Examinations in Mathematics, Reading and Science prescribed by the Department for each testing period. Each edition of those examinations must be based upon the standards of content and performance adopted pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 3-9-88; A 9-15-89; 12-11-89; 9-13-91; 10-8-93, eff. 9-1-94; R115-97, 12-10-97; R019-98, 4-17-98; R065-99, 11-3-99; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R072-01, 11-7-2001, eff. 7-1-2002; R042-05, 10-31-2005; R020-09, 10-27-2009; R037-12, 9-14-2012; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.071  Proficiency examinations in writing: High school; fifth and eighth grades. (NRS 385.080, 389.550)  Each edition of the Nevada Fifth and Eighth Grade Proficiency Examinations in Writing must be based upon the standards of content and performance in English language arts adopted pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 3-9-88; A 9-13-91; 10-8-93, eff. 9-1-94; R072-01, 11-7-2001; R042-05, 10-31-2005; R020-09, 10-27-2009; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.083  Maintenance of results of examinations and list of names and scores. (NRS 385.080, 389.550, 389.805)

     1.  A school district shall keep the results of all examinations administered pursuant to NRS 389.550 to pupils in grades 3 through 8 for 4 years after the date of the administration of the examinations.

     2.  The Department shall keep the results of all examinations administered pursuant to NRS 389.550 to pupils in grades 3 through 8 for 4 years after the date of the administration of the examinations.

     3.  The Department shall maintain a list of the name and scores of each pupil who takes the High School Proficiency Examinations for 10 years after the date of the administration of the Examinations. A school district shall maintain a list of the name and scores of each pupil who takes the High School Proficiency Examinations for 10 years after the date of the administration of the Examinations.

     4.  The Department shall maintain a list of the name and scores of each pupil who takes an end-of-course examination for 10 years after the date of the administration of the examination. A school district shall maintain a list of the name and scores of each pupil who takes an end-of-course examination for 10 years after the date of the administration of the examination.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 9-13-91; A 1-26-94, eff. 9-1-94; R072-01, 11-1-2001; R042-05, 10-31-2005; R020-09, 10-27-2009; R037-12, 9-14-2012; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

KINDERGARTEN THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL

     NAC 389.167  World language at the novice-mid proficiency level. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Instruction in a course of study in a world language at the novice-mid proficiency level must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by completion of the final course of instruction:

     1.  For the area of interpersonal communication, interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings and opinions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Greet and leave people in a polite way;

     (b) Introduce himself or herself and others;

     (c) Answer a variety of simple questions;

     (d) Make simple statements in a conversation; and

     (e) Ask simple questions.

     2.  For the area of interpretive communication, understand, interpret and analyze what is heard, read or viewed on a variety of topics, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Understand a few courtesy phrases;

     (b) Recognize and understand basic information;

     (c) Recognize and understand words for a specific purpose; and

     (d) Recognize and understand words, phrases and characters using visuals or guidance or through association with what the pupil already knows.

     3.  For the area of presentational communication, present information, concepts and ideas to explain and inform, persuade and narrate on a variety of topics using appropriate media and adapt to various audiences of listeners, readers or viewers, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Present information using words or phrases about himself or herself and his or her daily activities, likes and dislikes;

     (b) Fill out a simple form with basic information;

     (c) Write about himself or herself using learned phrases and memorized expressions; and

     (d) List daily activities and write lists that assist the pupil in his or her daily life.

     4.  For the area of relating cultural practices to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Initiate greetings and use appropriate gestures specific to the cultures being studied;

     (b) Identify common social practices of the cultures being studied; and

     (c) Describe some aspects of major traditions and celebrations of the cultures being studied.

     5.  For the area of relating cultural products to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify:

     (a) Products specific to the cultures being studied and their uses; and

     (b) Similarities and differences between products commonly used for expression in the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture.

     6.  For the area of making connections, build, reinforce and expand the pupil’s knowledge of other disciplines while using the world language to develop critical thinking and solve problems creatively, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Describe and identify geographic locations relative to each other on a map;

     (b) Complete basic math functions;

     (c) Compare, contrast, discuss and retell aspects of authentic texts of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Identify dates, figures and events of historical importance.

     7.  For the area of acquiring information and diverse perspectives, access and evaluate information and diverse perspectives that are available through the world language and its cultures, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify measurement systems of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Describe products of the cultures being studied; and

     (c) Recognize and interact with simple authentic resources of the cultures being studied.

     8.  For the area of language comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the world language being studied and the pupil’s native language, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize cognates, word families and language patterns;

     (b) Demonstrate that languages have important sound distinctions;

     (c) Analyze the writing system of the world language; and

     (d) Identify language patterns and grammatical functions.

     9.  For the area of cultural comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify cultural differences about traditions, celebrations and customs; and

     (b) Recognize various uses of language registers.

     10.  For the area of school and global communities, use the world language within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in the pupil’s community and the globalized world, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify settings where the world language can be used.

     11.  For the area of lifelong learning, set goals and reflect on the pupil’s progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment and advancement, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply knowledge of languages to personal, real world interests;

     (b) Evaluate his or her acquired skills; and

     (c) Reflect on his or her acquired skills.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.169  World language at the novice-high proficiency level. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Instruction in a course of study in a world language at the novice-high proficiency level must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by completion of the final course of instruction:

     1.  For the area of interpersonal communication, interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings and opinions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Exchange personal information;

     (b) Exchange information using texts, graphs or pictures;

     (c) Ask for and give simple directions;

     (d) Make plans with other persons; and

     (e) Interact with other persons in everyday situations.

     2.  For the area of interpretive communication, understand, interpret and analyze what is heard, read or viewed on a variety of topics, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Understand simple questions or statements on familiar topics;

     (b) Understand simple information using pictures and graphs;

     (c) Usually understand short, simple messages on familiar topics;

     (d) Understand short, simple descriptions; and

     (e) Understand the main idea of published materials.

     3.  For the area of presentational communication, present information, concepts and ideas to explain and inform, persuade and narrate on a variety of topics using appropriate media and adapt to various audiences of listeners, readers or viewers, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Present and write information using phrases and simple sentences about the pupil’s life and familiar experiences or about a familiar person, place or thing; and

     (b) Write short notes about things the pupil has learned and request information.

     4.  For the area of relating cultural practices to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use appropriate gestures and social courtesies of the cultures being studied in a variety of structured, everyday situations;

     (b) Investigate common social practices of the cultures being studied in relevant situations; and

     (c) Examine major traditions and celebrations of the cultures being studied and the practices associated with them.

     5.  For the area of relating cultural products to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to examine how the contributions of people from the cultures being studied have impacted those cultures in areas such as science, technology and the arts.

     6.  For the area of making connections, build, reinforce and expand the pupil’s knowledge of other disciplines while using the world language to develop critical thinking and solve problems creatively, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Describe and identify geographic locations, terrain and features;

     (b) Complete basic math functions;

     (c) Compare, contrast, discuss and retell aspects of authentic texts of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Identify dates, figures and events of historical importance.

     7.  For the area of acquiring information and diverse perspectives, access and evaluate information and diverse perspectives that are available through the world language and its cultures, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Compare and contrast measurement systems of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Describe products of the cultures being studied;

     (c) Recognize authentic resources of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Interact with authentic resources of the cultures being studied.

     8.  For the area of language comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the world language being studied and the pupil’s native language, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize cognates, word families and language patterns;

     (b) Demonstrate that languages have important sound distinctions;

     (c) Analyze the writing system of the world language; and

     (d) Identify language patterns and grammatical functions.

     9.  For the area of cultural comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify cultural differences about traditions, celebrations and customs; and

     (b) Recognize various language registers and their uses.

     10.  For the area of school and global communities, use the world language within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in the pupil’s community and the globalized world, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify settings where the world language can be used.

     11.  For the area of lifelong learning, set goals and reflect on the pupil’s progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment and advancement, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply knowledge of languages to personal, real world interests;

     (b) Evaluate his or her acquired skills; and

     (c) Reflect on his or her acquired skills.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.171  World language at the intermediate-low proficiency level. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Instruction in a course of study in a world language at the intermediate-low proficiency level must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by completion of the final course of instruction:

     1.  For the area of interpersonal communication, interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings and opinions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Hold a simple conversation on a number of everyday topics;

     (b) Use the world language to meet basic needs in familiar situations; and

     (c) Ask and answer questions on factual information that is familiar to the pupil.

     2.  For the area of interpretive communication, understand, interpret and analyze what is heard, read or viewed on a variety of topics, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Understand messages related to basic needs and the basic purpose of a message;

     (b) Understand questions and simple statements on everyday topics when engaging in a conversation;

     (c) Identify simple information on a form; and

     (d) Identify information from news media.

     3.  For the area of presentational communication, present information, concepts and ideas to explain and inform, persuade and narrate on a variety of topics using appropriate media and adapt to various audiences of listeners, readers or viewers, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Talk and write about people, activities and experiences;

     (b) Talk and write about needs and wants;

     (c) Exchange information about plans;

     (d) Present songs, short skits or dramatic readings;

     (e) Talk and write about topics of interest;

     (f) Give basic instructions; and

     (g) Prepare materials for a presentation.

     4.  For the area of relating cultural practices to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Examine simple patterns of behavior, gestures and social courtesies of the cultures being studied in a variety of informal and formal situations;

     (b) Compare the daily practices of people in the cultures being studied with the daily practices of the pupil; and

     (c) Interpret and explain the cultural relevance and historical context of traditions and celebrations of the cultures being studied.

     5.  For the area of relating cultural products to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to analyze and assess factors that impact products of the cultures being studied.

     6.  For the area of making connections, build, reinforce and expand the pupil’s knowledge of other disciplines while using the world language to develop critical thinking and solve problems creatively, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Discuss how geographic locations affect practices, perspectives and products;

     (b) Analyze and evaluate aspects of authentic texts of the cultures being studied with some details; and

     (c) Analyze historic contributions of the cultures being studied.

     7.  For the area of acquiring information and diverse perspectives, access and evaluate information and diverse perspectives that are available through the world language and its cultures, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Interact with authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (c) Analyze, examine and evaluate products of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Interpret perspectives unique to the cultures being studied.

     8.  For the area of language comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the world language being studied and the pupil’s native language, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize the equivalent meanings of idiomatic expressions and other linguistic concepts; and

     (b) Employ language patterns and grammatical functions.

     9.  For the area of cultural comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze cultural differences in traditions, celebrations and customs; and

     (b) Describe examples of cultural diversity and the contributions of the cultures being studied that exist in the pupil’s community.

     10.  For the area of school and global communities, use the world language within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in the pupil’s community and the globalized world, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify settings where the world language can be used;

     (b) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the use and understanding of the world language;

     (c) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Communicate and reflect on interactions with members of the cultures being studied.

     11.  For the area of lifelong learning, set goals and reflect on the pupil’s progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment and advancement, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply knowledge of languages to personal, real world interests;

     (b) Evaluate his or her acquired skills; and

     (c) Reflect on his or her acquired skills.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.173  World language at the intermediate-mid proficiency level. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Instruction in a course of study in a world language at the intermediate-mid proficiency level must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by completion of the final course of instruction:

     1.  For the area of interpersonal communication, interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings and opinions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Start, maintain and end a conversation on a variety of familiar topics;

     (b) Talk about daily activities and personal preferences;

     (c) Use the world language to complete tasks related to personal needs; and

     (d) Exchange information about topics of personal interest to the pupil.

     2.  For the area of interpretive communication, understand, interpret and analyze what is heard, read or viewed on a variety of topics, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to understand:

     (a) Basic information in advertisements and recordings;

     (b) Messages related to everyday life; and

     (c) Simple written exchanges between other people.

     3.  For the area of presentational communication, present information, concepts and ideas to explain and inform, persuade and narrate on a variety of topics using appropriate media and adapt to various audiences of listeners, readers or viewers, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Present and write about personal and social experiences;

     (b) Present and write about something learned or researched;

     (c) Present and write about common interests and issues;

     (d) Take a critical stance on a topic of interest; and

     (e) Write messages, announcements and communications for distribution.

     4.  For the area of relating cultural practices to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze social interactions typical of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Analyze behavior patterns in the cultures being studied; and

     (c) Connect and relate the cultural relevance and historical context of traditions and celebrations of the cultures being studied to current events.

     5.  For the area of relating cultural products to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to investigate and explain how cultural perspectives and other factors contribute to shaping the products and goods of a culture.

     6.  For the area of making connections, build, reinforce and expand the pupil’s knowledge of other disciplines while using the world language to develop critical thinking and solve problems creatively, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Discuss how geographic locations affect practices, perspectives and products;

     (b) Analyze and evaluate aspects of authentic texts of the cultures being studied with some details; and

     (c) Analyze historic contributions and controversies of the cultures being studied.

     7.  For the area of acquiring information and diverse perspectives, access and evaluate information and diverse perspectives that are available through the world language and its cultures, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Interact with authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (c) Analyze, examine and evaluate products of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Interpret perspectives unique to the cultures being studied.

     8.  For the area of language comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the world language being studied and the pupil’s native language, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize the equivalent meaning of idiomatic expressions and other linguistic concepts; and

     (b) Employ language patterns and grammatical functions.

     9.  For the area of cultural comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze cultural differences in traditions, celebrations and customs; and

     (b) Describe examples of cultural diversity and the contributions of the cultures being studied that exist in the pupil’s community.

     10.  For the area of school and global communities, use the world language within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in the pupil’s community and the globalized world, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify settings where the world language can be used;

     (b) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the use and understanding of the world language;

     (c) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Communicate and reflect on interactions with members of the cultures being studied.

     11.  For the area of lifelong learning, set goals and reflect on the pupil’s progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment and advancement, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply knowledge of languages to personal, real world interests;

     (b) Evaluate his or her acquired skills; and

     (c) Reflect on his or her acquired skills.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.177  World language at the intermediate-high proficiency level. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Instruction in a course of study in a world language at the intermediate-high proficiency level must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by completion of the final course of instruction:

     1.  For the area of interpersonal communication, interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings and opinions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Exchange information related to areas of mutual interest;

     (b) Use the world language to complete a task that requires multiple steps; and

     (c) Use the world language to handle a situation that may have a complication.

     2.  For the area of interpretive communication, understand, interpret and analyze what is heard, read or viewed on a variety of topics, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Easily understand straightforward information or interactions;

     (b) Understand situations with complicating factors;

     (c) Understand accounts of personal events; and

     (d) Follow short, written instructions when supported by visual information.

     3.  For the area of presentational communication, present information, concepts and ideas to explain and inform, persuade and narrate on a variety of topics using appropriate media and adapt to various audiences of listeners, readers or viewers, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Present information on academic and work topics, events, activities and topics of particular interests;

     (b) Present a point of view with reasons to support that point of view; and

     (c) Write about school and academic topics, community topics, entertainment events and work and career topics.

     4.  For the area of relating cultural practices to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to evaluate texts and presentations of the cultures being studied for cultural viewpoints, values and bias.

     5.  For the area of relating cultural products to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to explain the influence of the cultures being studied on literature, the media and global concerns.

     6.  For the area of making connections, build, reinforce and expand the pupil’s knowledge of other disciplines while using the world language to develop critical thinking and solve problems creatively, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Discuss how geographic locations affect practices, perspectives and products; and

     (b) Cultivate personal perspectives in relation to historic contributions and controversies of the cultures being studied.

     7.  For the area of acquiring information and diverse perspectives, access and evaluate information and diverse perspectives that are available through the world language and its cultures, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Interact with authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (c) Analyze, examine and evaluate products of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Interpret perspectives unique to the cultures being studied.

     8.  For the area of language comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the world language being studied and the pupil’s native language, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize the equivalent meanings of idiomatic expressions and other linguistic concepts; and

     (b) Employ language patterns and grammatical functions.

     9.  For the area of cultural comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze cultural differences in traditions, celebrations and customs; and

     (b) Describe examples of cultural diversity and the contributions of the cultures being studied that exist in the pupil’s community.

     10.  For the area of school and global communities, use the world language within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in the pupil’s community and the globalized world, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify settings where the world language can be used;

     (b) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the use and understanding of the world language;

     (c) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Communicate and reflect on interactions with members of the cultures being studied.

     11.  For the area of lifelong learning, set goals and reflect on the pupil’s progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment and advancement, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply knowledge of languages to personal, real world interests;

     (b) Evaluate his or her acquired skills; and

     (c) Reflect on his or her acquired skills.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.179  World language at the advanced-low proficiency level. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Instruction in a course of study in a world language at the advanced-low proficiency level must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by completion of the final course of instruction:

     1.  For the area of interpersonal communication, interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings and opinions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Participate in conversations on a wide variety of topics that go beyond everyday life;

     (b) Compare and contrast life in different settings;

     (c) Resolve an unexpected complication that arises in a familiar situation; and

     (d) Conduct or participate in interviews.

     2.  For the area of interpretive communication, understand, interpret and analyze what is heard, read or viewed on a variety of topics, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Understand descriptions and stories of events that have happened or will happen;

     (b) Understand the main idea of popular genres;

     (c) Find and use information for practical purposes;

     (d) Read texts that compare and contrast information; and

     (e) Follow written instructions.

     3.  For the area of presentational communication, present information, concepts and ideas to explain and inform, persuade and narrate on a variety of topics using appropriate media and adapt to various audiences of listeners, readers or viewers, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to present and write about:

     (a) Academic and workplace topics for a specific audience;

     (b) Social and cultural topics for a specific audience; and

     (c) Community interests for a specific audience.

     4.  For the area of relating cultural practices to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Explain some factors that contribute to why products and practices vary across cultures;

     (b) Analyze how the practices and behaviors of people reflect their cultures and belief systems; and

     (c) Explore topics of personal and professional interest.

     5.  For the area of relating cultural products to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify examples of the influence of the cultures being studied on historic and contemporary media and entertainment;

     (b) Critique the influence of the cultures being studied on literature, the media and global concerns; and

     (c) Explain how social, political, religious and economic institutions reflect cultural beliefs.

     6.  For the area of making connections, build, reinforce and expand the pupil’s knowledge of other disciplines while using the world language to develop critical thinking and solve problems creatively, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze and evaluate how geographic locations affect practices, perspectives and products; and

     (b) Use supporting evidence to cultivate personal perspectives in relation to historic contributions and controversies.

     7.  For the area of acquiring information and diverse perspectives, access and evaluate information and diverse perspectives that are available through the world language and its cultures, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Interact with authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (c) Analyze, examine and evaluate products of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Interpret perspectives unique to the cultures being studied.

     8.  For the area of language comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the world language being studied and the pupil’s native language, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use complex idiomatic expressions and language structures with increasing accuracy; and

     (b) Identify or recognize different dialects and register use from different regions, cultures and contexts.

     9.  For the area of cultural comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze the perspectives of the cultures being studied as reflected in art and literature; and

     (b) Explain the development of traditions, celebrations and customs in the cultures being studied.

     10.  For the area of school and global communities, use the world language within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in the pupil’s community and the globalized world, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify settings where the world language can be used;

     (b) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the use and understanding of the world language;

     (c) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Communicate and reflect on interactions with members of the cultures being studied.

     11.  For the area of lifelong learning, set goals and reflect on the pupil’s progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment and advancement, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply knowledge of languages to personal, real world interests;

     (b) Evaluate his or her acquired skills; and

     (c) Reflect on his or her acquired skills.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.181  World language at the advanced-mid proficiency level. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Instruction in a course of study in a world language at the advanced-mid proficiency level must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by completion of the final course of instruction:

     1.  For the area of interpersonal communication, interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings and opinions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Communicate effectively on a wide variety of present, past and future events;

     (b) Exchange general information on topics beyond the pupil’s personal fields of interest; and

     (c) Handle a complication or unexpected turn of events.

     2.  For the area of interpretive communication, understand, interpret and analyze what is heard, read or viewed on a variety of topics, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Understand the main idea and many details of descriptions or interviews, accounts of events and directions regarding everyday tasks; and

     (b) Follow the general idea and some details of what is written in a story, the details of past, present and future events, and topics beyond the pupil’s personal fields of interest.

     3.  For the area of presentational communication, present information, concepts and ideas to explain and inform, persuade and narrate on a variety of topics using appropriate media and adapt to various audiences of listeners, readers or viewers, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Present and write about public and personal information;

     (b) Convey ideas and elaborate on a variety of academic topics;

     (c) Present and write with ease and detail on a wide variety of topics; and

     (d) Write well-organized texts about academic, professional and general topics of interest.

     4.  For the area of relating cultural practices to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Explain some factors that contribute to why products and practices vary across cultures;

     (b) Analyze how the practices and behaviors of people reflect their cultures and belief systems; and

     (c) Explore topics of personal and professional interest.

     5.  For the area of relating cultural products to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify examples of the influence of the cultures being studied on historic and contemporary media and entertainment;

     (b) Critique the influence of the cultures being studied on literature, the media and global concerns; and

     (c) Explain how social, political, religious and economic institutions reflect cultural beliefs.

     6.  For the area of making connections, build, reinforce and expand the pupil’s knowledge of other disciplines while using the world language to develop critical thinking and solve problems creatively, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze and evaluate how geographic locations affect practices, perspectives and products; and

     (b) Use supporting evidence to cultivate personal perspectives in relation to historic contributions and controversies.

     7.  For the area of acquiring information and diverse perspectives, access and evaluate information and diverse perspectives that are available through the world language and its cultures, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Interact with authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (c) Analyze, examine and evaluate products and goods of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Interpret perspectives unique to the cultures being studied.

     8.  For the area of language comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the world language being studied and the pupil’s native language, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use complex idiomatic expressions and language structures with increasing accuracy; and

     (b) Identify or recognize different dialects and register use from different regions, cultures and contexts.

     9.  For the area of cultural comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze the perspectives of the cultures being studied as reflected in art and literature; and

     (b) Explain the development of traditions, celebrations and customs in the cultures being studied.

     10.  For the area of school and global communities, use the world language within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in the pupil’s community and the globalized world, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify settings where the world language can be used;

     (b) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the use and understanding of the world language;

     (c) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Communicate and reflect on interactions with members of the cultures being studied.

     11.  For the area of lifelong learning, set goals and reflect on the pupil’s progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment and advancement, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply knowledge of languages to personal, real world interests;

     (b) Evaluate his or her acquired skills; and

     (c) Reflect on his or her acquired skills.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.183  World language at the advanced-high proficiency level. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Instruction in a course of study in a world language at the advanced-high proficiency level must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by completion of the final course of instruction:

     1.  For the area of interpersonal communication, interact and negotiate meaning in spoken, signed or written conversations to share information, reactions, feelings and opinions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Exchange complex information about academic and professional tasks;

     (b) Exchange detailed information on topics within and beyond the pupil’s personal fields of interest; and

     (c) Support personal opinions and construct hypotheses.

     2.  For the area of interpretive communication, understand, interpret and analyze what is heard, read or viewed on a variety of topics, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Easily understand detailed reports and various viewpoints in extended arguments; and

     (b) Understand narrative, descriptive and informational texts of any length.

     3.  For the area of presentational communication, present information, concepts and ideas to explain and inform, persuade and narrate on a variety of topics using appropriate media and adapt to various audiences of listeners, readers or viewers, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Present and write about complex information on concrete topics;

     (b) Present and write about a viewpoint with supporting arguments;

     (c) Use appropriate presentational conventions; and

     (d) Use appropriate written conventions for informal and formal purposes.

     4.  For the area of relating cultural practices to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze cultural practices and perspectives on a variety of social and work-related interactions;

     (b) Compare and contrast perceptions of the cultures being studied with external perceptions; and

     (c) Examine and explain the effect of events in the history of the cultures being studied on contemporary practices and products.

     5.  For the area of relating cultural products to perspectives, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures being studied, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify examples of the influence of the cultures being studied on historic and contemporary media and entertainment; and

     (b) Critique the influence of the cultures being studied on literature, the media and global concerns.

     6.  For the area of making connections, build, reinforce and expand the pupil’s knowledge of other disciplines while using the world language to develop critical thinking and solve problems creatively, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze and evaluate how geographic locations affect practices, perspectives and products; and

     (b) Cultivate personal perspectives relating to historic contributions or controversies with supporting evidence.

     7.  For the area of acquiring information and diverse perspectives, access and evaluate information and diverse perspectives that are available through the world language and its cultures, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (b) Interact with authentic resources of the cultures being studied;

     (c) Analyze, examine and evaluate products of the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Interpret perspectives unique to the cultures being studied.

     8.  For the area of language comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the world language being studied and the pupil’s native language, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use complex idiomatic expressions and language structures with increasing accuracy; and

     (b) Identify or recognize different dialects and register use from different regions, cultures and contexts.

     9.  For the area of cultural comparisons, use the world language to investigate, explain and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures being studied and the pupil’s own culture, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze the perspectives of the cultures being studied as reflected in art and literature; and

     (b) Explain the development of traditions, celebrations and customs in the cultures being studied.

     10.  For the area of school and global communities, use the world language within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in the pupil’s community and the globalized world, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify settings where the world language can be used;

     (b) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the use and understanding of the world language;

     (c) Demonstrate the ability to find resources that relate to the cultures being studied; and

     (d) Communicate and reflect on interactions with members of the cultures being studied.

     11.  For the area of lifelong learning, set goals and reflect on the pupil’s progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment and advancement, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply knowledge of languages to personal, real world interests;

     (b) Evaluate his or her acquired skills; and

     (c) Reflect on his or her acquired skills.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R063-14, eff. 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.187  Academic, career, and personal and social development. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.180)  A course of study in academic, career, and personal and social development must include instruction designed to teach pupils in kindergarten through the completion of the 12th grade, as applicable:

     1.  For the area of academic development, how to implement strategies and activities which support and maximize the ability of a pupil to learn, as demonstrated by the pupil’s ability to:

     (a) Improve the academic self-concept of the pupil;

     (b) Develop skills that contribute to effective learning and use those skills to improve the ability of the pupil to learn;

     (c) Achieve success in school;

     (d) Develop and implement plans which enable the pupil to achieve his or her goals; and

     (e) Understand the relationship between the education of the pupil and his or her life experiences.

     2.  For the area of career development, how to provide the foundation for the development of skills, attitudes and knowledge which are necessary for the pupil to make a successful transition from school to his or her career and from career to career throughout his or her life span, as demonstrated by the pupil’s ability to:

     (a) Develop an awareness of career choices and acquire information relating to those careers;

     (b) Develop and implement employability skills;

     (c) Identify the career goals of the pupil and acquire the knowledge necessary to achieve those goals; and

     (d) Apply the skills necessary to achieve the pupil’s career goals.

     3.  For the area of personal and social development, how to develop the foundation for the personal and social development of the pupil as the pupil progresses from kindergarten through high school and into adulthood, as demonstrated by the pupil’s ability to:

     (a) Acquire self-knowledge and interpersonal and personal safety skills, including, without limitation, safety skills relating to the use of electronic technology and electronic devices; and

     (b) Apply self-knowledge when making decisions, setting goals and taking the necessary actions to achieve those goals.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R010-03, eff. 10-30-2003; A by R169-12, 11-1-2012)

PREKINDERGARTEN, ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, MIDDLE SCHOOL AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Prescribed Courses

     NAC 389.195  Elementary school. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185)

     1.  The State Board of Education prescribes the following courses of study for elementary schools:

     (a) Reading.

     (b) Language.

     (c) Social studies.

     (d) Mathematics.

     (e) Science.

     (f) Art.

     (g) Music.

     (h) Health.

     (i) Physical education.

     (j) Computers.

     2.  In addition to the courses prescribed by subsection 1, a course of study in:

     (a) Introduction to technology is prescribed for pupils in sixth, seventh or eighth grade.

     (b) Academic achievement, career exploration, and personal and social development is prescribed for pupils in seventh or eighth grade.

     3.  A local school board may offer:

     (a) A course in a world language as an elective course for pupils in kindergarten through the eighth grade.

     (b) A course in home and career skills as an elective course for pupils in seventh and eighth grades.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, 8-26-85, eff. 8-1-86; A 5-27-92; R065-97, 12-10-97; R010-03, 10-30-2003; R063-14, 10-24-2014)

Instruction: Prekindergarten Through Second Grade

     NAC 389.232  Kindergarten: Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for kindergarten are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for kindergarten may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in kindergarten in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of kindergarten, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.237  Kindergarten: Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for kindergarten are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for mathematics for kindergarten may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in kindergarten in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of kindergarten, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.238  Kindergarten: Social studies. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  Instruction in kindergarten in social studies must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of kindergarten:

     1.  For the area of social study skills:

     (a) Acquire and apply skills of reading, writing and oral communication to construct knowledge, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Interpret illustrations.

          (2) Listen to a story to acquire information on a main idea.

          (3) Identify vocabulary using illustrations.

     (b) Acquire, organize, use and evaluate information that prepares a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Gather and present information orally.

          (2) Identify maps, graphs and charts.

          (3) Use appropriate technological resources which support learning.

     (c) Demonstrate historical comprehension by analyzing and interpreting historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts and interpretations or perspectives on past events, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Understand the concepts of yesterday, today and tomorrow.

          (2) Identify sources of information.

          (3) Listen to historical fiction.

     (d) Demonstrate skills which prepare a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate responsibility for the well-being of himself or herself.

          (2) Listen and participate as a member of a group in the classroom.

     2.  For the area of history:

     (a) Understand the development, characteristics and interaction of persons, cultures, societies, religions and ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discuss the importance of working with other persons to complete tasks.

          (2) Listen to stories of family members, residents and prominent persons that emphasize the human experience.

          (3) Listen to stories of persons and families from around the world.

     (b) Understand the influences of persons, events, ideas and conflicts in the development of nations, empires, cultures and political and economic ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify problems that arise when persons live and work together.

     (c) Understand the influences of social ideas and personal action on social, political, economic and technological change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Recognize differences between the home in which the pupil lives and the school in which the pupil is enrolled.

          (2) Describe the importance of working with other persons to complete tasks.

          (3) Identify the occupations of persons in the school in which the pupil is enrolled.

          (4) Demonstrate respect for other pupils in the classroom and in the school.

          (5) Discuss events that are important to the pupil and the pupil’s family.

     3.  For the area of geography:

     (a) Use maps, globes and other geographic tools and technologies to locate and extrapolate information about persons, places and environments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to recognize that a globe is a representation of Earth and use vocabulary related to direction and location, including, without limitation, up, down, left, right, near, far, above and beyond.

     (b) Understand the physical and human features of places, and use that information to define and study regions and their patterns of changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify the areas in the home and the classroom that have different purposes, including, without limitation, the kitchen, bedroom, exit door and teacher’s desk.

          (2) Describe himself or herself as a unique person with characteristics that are similar to other pupils.

          (3) Recall from memory the street on which the pupil lives.

          (4) Identify the geographic setting of a picture or a story.

     (c) Understand how economic, political and cultural processes interact to shape patterns of human migration and settlement, influence and interdependence, and conflict and cooperation, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to explain that persons move from one location to another.

     (d) Understand the effects of interactions between human and physical systems, and changes in the use, distribution and importance of resources, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to recognize seasonal changes in weather and how persons adapt to those changes.

     4.  For the area of economics:

     (a) Understand how scarcity and incentives affect choices, how markets work, why markets form, how supply and demand interact to determine market price and how changes in prices act as economic signals to coordinate trade, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate the scarcity of resources.

          (2) Identify jobs in the community.

     (b) Identify indicators used to measure economic performance, understand important aspects of how the economy acts as a system, and understand the roles of money, interest rates, saving and borrowing, financial institutions and the central banking system in the economy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify the currency used in the United States.

     (c) Identify the causes of economic change and explain how the economic system of the United States responds to those changes and how other economic systems respond to changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to make decisions regarding resources in the classroom.

     5.  For the area of civics:

     (a) Know why society needs rules, law and governments, and understand the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify and follow classroom and school rules concerning behavior and resolution of conflicts.

          (2) Identify a pupil’s rights within the classroom.

          (3) Recognize personal choices.

          (4) Recognize the Pledge of Allegiance.

          (5) Name a traditional patriotic activity, holiday or symbol of the United States.

     (b) Explain the different political systems in the world and how those systems relate to the United States and the citizens of the United States, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to name the school in which the pupil is enrolled.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R011-09, eff. 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.239  Kindergarten: Science. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  Instruction in kindergarten in science must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of kindergarten:

     1.  For the area of physical science, understand:

     (a) The forces and interactions which affect motion and stability, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of pushes and pulls on the motion of an object.

          (2) Analyze data to determine if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object by pushing or pulling the object.

     (b) Energy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on the surface of the earth.

          (2) Use tools and materials to design and build a structure to reduce the warming effect of sunlight on an area.

     2.  For the area of life science, understand the structures and processes from molecules to organisms, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to use observations to describe patterns of the things plants and animals, including humans, need to survive.

     3.  For the area of earth science, understand:

     (a) The earth’s systems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use and share observations of local weather conditions to describe patterns over time.

          (2) Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals, including humans, are able to change the environment to meet their needs.

     (b) The earth and human activity on earth, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants or animals, including humans, and the places they live.

          (2) Ask questions to obtain information about the purpose of weather forecasting to prepare for, and respond to, severe weather.

          (3) Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on land, water, air and other living things in the local environment.

     4.  For the area of engineering technology, understand design, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Ask questions, make observations and gather information about a situation for which a change is desired to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.

     (b) Develop a simple sketch, drawing or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.

     (c) Analyze data from tests of two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of the performance of each object.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R084-13, eff. 6-23-2014; R141-14, 10-27-2015)

     NAC 389.2418  First grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the first grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for the first grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the first grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in kindergarten for English language arts offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the first grade in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of the first grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.24195  First grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the first grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for mathematics for the first grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the first grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in kindergarten for mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the first grade in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of the first grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.2421  First grade: Social studies. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the first grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in kindergarten for social studies offered in public schools. Instruction in the first grade in social studies must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the first grade:

     1.  For the area of social study skills:

     (a) Acquire and apply skills of reading, writing and oral communication to construct knowledge, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Listen for main ideas in text that is read to the pupil.

          (2) Listen for the main idea and sequence of events in the context of social studies.

          (3) Use vocabulary in sentences.

     (b) Acquire, organize, use and evaluate information that prepares a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Research a prescribed topic in social studies.

          (2) Conduct research by locating, gathering and organizing information.

          (3) Present information orally.

          (4) Identify maps, graphs, charts and diagrams as sources of information.

          (5) Practice the responsible use of technology.

          (6) Use technological resources for solving problems, communicating and illustrating thoughts and ideas.

     (c) Demonstrate historical comprehension by analyzing and interpreting historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts and interpretations or perspectives on past events, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify events that took place yesterday and events that take place today.

          (2) Identify sources of information.

          (3) Read or listen, or both, to historical fiction.

          (4) Identify self-perspective.

     (d) Demonstrate skills which prepare a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate responsibility for the well-being of himself or herself.

          (2) Listen and participate as a member of a group in the classroom.

     2.  For the area of history:

     (a) Understand the development, characteristics and interactions of persons, cultures, societies, religions and ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe lifeways of persons who lived in the local community in the past, including, without limitation, their jobs, schools, methods of communication, transportation and recreation.

          (2) Listen to stories that reflect the beliefs, customs, ceremonies and traditions of the different cultures in the neighborhood around the school.

          (3) Listen to histories of important landmarks in the community that create a sense of community among persons in the community.

          (4) Listen to stories that reflect the beliefs, customs, ceremonies, traditions and social practices of cultures from around the world.

          (5) Identify landmarks from around the world.

     (b) Understand the influences of persons, events, ideas and conflicts in the development of nations, empires, cultures and political and economic ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify methods of sharing that resolve problems in the classroom and at the school.

     (c) Understand the influences of social ideas and personal action on social, political, economic and technological change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the neighborhood around the school in which the pupil is enrolled.

          (2) Compare or contrast, or both, the daily life of the pupil with the daily life of the pupil’s parent or legal guardian.

          (3) Identify and describe occupations in the community that help persons, including, without limitation, law enforcement officers, firefighters and nurses.

          (4) Demonstrate respect for other pupils and persons in the neighborhood around the school.

          (5) Discuss events that are happening at the school in which the pupil is enrolled.

     3.  For the area of geography:

     (a) Use maps, globes and other geographic tools and technologies to locate and extrapolate information about persons, places and environments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Differentiate between and identify water and land on a map and globe, and use the terms “ocean” and “continent.”

          (2) Describe maps as representations of places.

          (3) Recognize the shape of North America on a map of the world.

          (4) Use simple maps to illustrate direction.

          (5) Display geographic information in a visual manner using simple lists, graphs and maps.

     (b) Understand the physical and human features of places, and use that information to define and study regions and their patterns of changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Sort and group pictures that display geographic features, including, without limitation, forests, deserts and lake regions.

          (2) Identify the similarities and differences between persons in the community.

          (3) Identify patterns of change within the community, including, without limitation, construction.

          (4) Recall the home address and telephone number of the pupil.

     (c) Understand how economic, political and cultural processes interact to shape patterns of human migration and settlement, influence and interdependence, and conflict and cooperation, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use the classroom population to categorize simple demographic information.

          (2) Explain that a person may live in a location other than the location where the person was born.

          (3) Identify characteristics of rural and urban communities.

     (d) Understand the effects of interactions between human and physical systems, and changes in the use, distribution and importance of resources, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Tell how the physical environment affects activity at school, including, without limitation, having recess inside or outside.

          (2) Identify locations in which a pupil may access basic resources available to the pupil, including, without limitation, food and water.

     4.  For the area of economics:

     (a) Understand how scarcity and incentives affect choices, how markets work, why markets form, how supply and demand interact to determine the market price and how changes in prices act as economic signals to coordinate trade, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Give examples of “all-or-nothing” choices.

          (2) Identify a consumer.

          (3) Identify a producer.

          (4) Give examples of ways persons earn money.

     (b) Identify indicators used to measure economic performance, understand important aspects of how the economy acts as a system, and understand the roles of money, interest rates, saving and borrowing, financial institutions and the central banking system in the economy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to explain what money is and how money is used.

     (c) Identify the causes of economic change and explain how the economic system of the United States responds to those changes and how other economic systems respond to changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify resources that are shared in the classroom and the community.

     (d) Explore trends in international trade, the impact of trade on the economy of the United States and the role of exchange rates, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to define trade.

     5.  For the area of civics:

     (a) Know why society needs rules, law and governments, and understand the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify and follow classroom and school rules concerning behavior and resolution of conflicts.

          (2) Identify a pupil’s rights within the classroom.

          (3) Participate in making decisions for the class, including, without limitation, decisions regarding personal responsibilities in the classroom and school.

          (4) Recognize the Pledge of Allegiance.

          (5) Name a traditional patriotic activity, holiday or symbol of the United States.

     (b) Understand the United States Constitution and the government created by the United States Constitution, including, without limitation, the relationship between national and sub-national governments, and the structure and function of state and local governments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to name the current President of the United States.

     (c) Describe the roles of political parties, elections, interest groups, the media and public opinion in the democratic process, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify sources of information.

     (d) Explain the different political systems in the world and how those systems relate to the United States and the citizens of the United States, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to name the school in which the pupil is enrolled.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R011-09, eff. 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.2423  Prekindergarten through second grade: Health. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  Instruction in prekindergarten, kindergarten, first grade and second grade in health must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the second grade:

     1.  Comprehend concepts related to the promotion of health and the prevention of disease to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify behaviors concerning the health of a person that impact personal health;

     (b) Identify basic human anatomy, including, without limitation, the eyes, nose, ears and teeth;

     (c) Identify and respect the physical, emotional and intellectual differences of persons;

     (d) Describe how healthy eating and participating in daily physical activities promote health and well-being;

     (e) Identify substances which benefit the body and substances which are harmful to the body;

     (f) Recognize methods for preventing injuries and avoiding hazards common to children;

     (g) Identify school personnel and health and safety officials, including, without limitation, law enforcement officers and emergency personnel;

     (h) Recognize germs which may cause illnesses and diseases and measures which can be taken to help prevent the spread of those illnesses and diseases; and

     (i) Identify elements of the environment which may affect the health of a person, including, without limitation, the sun, air, water, soil, food and pollutants.

     2.  Access reliable health information, products and services to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify:

     (a) Persons who are trustworthy to help promote health; and

     (b) Providers of health care.

     3.  Practice health-enhancing behaviors and avoid and reduce health risks, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify responsible health behaviors;

     (b) Select foods that are healthy and help a person grow;

     (c) Explore movements that promote a lifestyle which is active and healthy; and

     (d) Identify the actions that may be taken for the personal safety of a person, including, without limitation, use of safety precautions while exposed to the sun, use of a helmet, obeying pedestrian rules, use of a safety belt, exercising safety around guns, use of emergency 911 services, using proper fire safety procedures and taking general safety precautions.

     4.  Analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology and other factors on behaviors concerning health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify different sources that influence behaviors which affect personal health;

     (b) Discuss the nutrition and physical activities of families from diverse cultures; and

     (c) Discuss different sources of influence that promote the use of substances which benefit the body and substances which are harmful to the body.

     5.  Use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and to reduce or avoid health risks, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) List healthy ways to communicate the wants, needs and feelings of the pupil and to listen to other persons who express wants, needs and feelings; and

     (b) Identify ways in which the pupil may respond to and report a situation that is unwanted, threatening or dangerous to the pupil or another person.

     6.  Use goal-setting skills to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Define the terms “short-term personal health goal” and “long-term personal health goal”;

     (b) Develop goals for practicing daily habits which promote health, including, without limitation, personal hygiene, safety precautions while exposed to the sun, nutrition and physical activity; and

     (c) Identify resources to assist the pupil with developing short-term personal health goals and long-term personal health goals, including, without limitation, goals concerning recycling, water conservation, proper disposal of garbage and trash, and food choices.

     7.  Promote and support personal, family and community health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify ways to promote personal and family health; and

     (b) Identify messages regarding consumer and environmental health.

     8.  Use decision-making skills to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Discuss choices which are beneficial and choices which are harmful to the health of the pupil;

     (b) Identify resources and persons that assist in making decisions to enhance the health of the pupil;

     (c) Identify situations which require decisions regarding the health of a person; and

     (d) Differentiate between situations in which a pupil must make a decision regarding health by himself or herself and situations in which a pupil must make a decision regarding health with the assistance of another person.

     9.  As used in this section, “prekindergarten” means a developmental program offered by a school district or charter school for pupils with special needs.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R032-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R013-09, 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.2424  Kindergarten through second grade: Technology and computers. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  Instruction in kindergarten through the second grade in technology and computers must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the second grade:

     1.  For the areas of creativity and innovation, demonstrate creative thinking, build knowledge and develop innovative products and processes using technology, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use digital tools to brainstorm and organize ideas;

     (b) Create an original work using a variety of digital tools to demonstrate personal or group expression;

     (c) With assistance from the teacher, use digital models and simulations; and

     (d) Identify patterns and predict possibilities in data from the classroom using digital tools.

     2.  For the areas of communication and collaboration, use digital media and environments to communicate and work in collaboration with other pupils, including pupils outside of the classroom, to support the learning of the pupil and the learning of other pupils, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Work in groups in the classroom to create and publish digital products;

     (b) Communicate information and ideas to other pupils and the parents of the pupil using digital text and illustrations;

     (c) Use digital resources to learn about places, persons, celebrations and maps; and

     (d) Work in a team to solve problems using digital tools.

     3.  For the area of fluency of research and information, gather, evaluate and use information, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Determine the steps necessary to answer a question using digital tools;

     (b) Identify and organize keywords and use multiple sources to answer a question;

     (c) Recognize that different sources of information and digital tools are appropriate for completing different tasks; and

     (d) Collect and display data using a variety of technological resources and report the results.

     4.  For the areas of critical thinking, problem solving and decision making, use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems and make informed decisions using the digital tools and resources that are appropriate for the specific task, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Investigate a problem that arises in an everyday situation using digital resources;

     (b) Use a digital planning tool;

     (c) Use data to answer a problem that arises in an everyday situation using digital tools; and

     (d) Explore alternative solutions to and diverse perspectives on problems that arise in everyday situations using digital tools.

     5.  For the area of the appropriate use of technology, understand human, cultural and societal issues relating to technology and practice legal and ethical behaviors when using technology, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) List the rules of the classroom governing the safe use of technology;

     (b) List potential dangers in digital environments and how to report situations that are potentially unsafe;

     (c) Use technologies in learning activities;

     (d) Describe how technology can enhance learning; and

     (e) Describe what it means to use technology in an appropriate manner and the responsibilities associated with using technology.

     6.  For the areas of technological operations and concepts, demonstrate an understanding of technological concepts, systems and operations, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) List examples of technological tools;

     (b) Use proper techniques for basic keyboarding skills;

     (c) Use software that is appropriate for the age of the pupil;

     (d) Demonstrate proper care of equipment; and

     (e) Use routine procedures for the technological tools in the classroom.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R008-10, eff. 6-30-2010)

     NAC 389.24245  First grade: Science. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the first grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in kindergarten for science offered in public schools. Instruction in the first grade in science must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the first grade:

     1.  For the area of physical science, understand waves and their application in technology for the transfer of information, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound waves and that sound waves can make materials vibrate.

     (b) Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects can be seen only when illuminated by light waves.

     (c) Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

     (d) Use tools and materials to design and build a device that uses light or sound waves to solve the problem of communicating over a distance.

     2.  For the area of life science, understand:

     (a) The structures and processes from molecules to organisms, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow and meet their needs.

          (2) Read texts and use media to determine patterns in the behavior of parents and their offspring that help the offspring survive.

     (b) The inheritance and variation of traits of heredity, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals, including humans, are similar to, but not exactly the same as, their parents.

     3.  For the area of earth science, understand the earth’s place in the universe, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use observations of the sun, moon and stars to describe patterns that can be predicted.

     (b) Make observations at different times of the year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

     4.  For the area of engineering technology, understand design, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Ask questions, make observations and gather information about a situation which persons have a desire to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of new or improved objects or tools.

     (b) Develop a simple sketch, drawing or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.

     (c) Analyze data from testing two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses displayed by each object.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R084-13, eff. 6-23-2014; A by R141-14, 10-27-2015)

     NAC 389.2425  Second grade: Physical education. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the second grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for courses in physical education offered in public schools. Instruction in kindergarten, first grade and second grade in physical education must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the second grade:

     1.   Demonstrate competency in the motor skills, patterns of movement and safety practices needed to perform a variety of physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Demonstrate the basic elements of forms of movement;

     (b) Perform a variety of basic manipulative skills in isolation;

     (c) Perform simple motor skills and patterns of movement; and

     (d) Demonstrate safe practices while participating in physical activities.

     2.  Apply concepts, principles and strategies relating to movement, performance and safety while participating in physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize the basic elements of forms of movement;

     (b) Demonstrate basic game strategies while participating in physical activities; and

     (c) Identify appropriate safety practices concerning spatial awareness with regard to oneself and other persons.

     3.  Participate regularly in physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Demonstrate the difference between sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous physical activity;

     (b) Apply healthy patterns of activity by participating regularly in physical activity; and

     (c) Demonstrate various ways to be physically active on a daily basis.

     4.  Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Practice health-related components of fitness in various physical activities; and

     (b) Identify the physiological signs of light, moderate and vigorous physical activity.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R033-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R062-13, 2-26-2014)

     NAC 389.2431  Second grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the second grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for the second grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the second grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for English language arts offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the second grade in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of the second grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.2433  Second grade: Information literacy. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the second grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades to be information literate. Instruction in the second grade, regardless of whether it takes place in the library or the classroom, must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards for information literacy by the completion of the second grade:

     1.  For the areas of understanding the process of obtaining information in such a manner as to access information efficiently and effectively, evaluate information critically and competently, and use information accurately and creatively, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Recognize the need for information by giving examples of situations in which information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question.

     (b) Recognize that accurate and comprehensive information is the basis for intelligent decision making by selecting examples of accurate and inaccurate information and complete and incomplete information.

     (c) Formulate questions by stating at least one broad question that will help in finding the needed information.

     (d) Identify a variety of potential sources of information by listing several sources of information and explaining the kind of information found in each source.

     (e) Develop and use successful strategies for locating information by listing some ideas for identifying and finding the needed information.

     (f) Distinguish among fact, point of view and opinion by recognizing those concepts in various sources and products of information.

     (g) Select information appropriate to a specific problem or question by recognizing information that is applicable to that problem or question.

     (h) Organize information for practical application by describing several ways to organize information, including chronologically, topically and hierarchically.

     (i) Integrate new information into a pupil’s existing knowledge by recognizing and understanding new information and ideas.

     (j) Apply information using critical thinking and problem-solving skills by identifying information that meets a particular need for information.

     (k) Produce and communicate information and ideas in appropriate formats by naming a variety of different formats for presenting different kinds of information.

     2.  For the areas of pursuing information related to personal interests, appreciating literature and other creative expressions of information, and striving for excellence in seeking information and generating knowledge, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information relating to various dimensions of personal well-being, such as vocational interests, involvement in community, matters concerning health and recreational pursuits by:

          (1) Occasionally seeking information about topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being; and

          (2) Generally expanding beyond the pupil’s own knowledge to seek information concerning topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being.

     (b) Design, develop and evaluate information and conclusions based upon that information relating to topics of personal interest to the pupil by organizing and presenting basic information gathered by the pupil relating to those topics of personal interest.

     (c) Function as a competent and self-motivated reader by explaining and discussing various examples of fiction.

     (d) Derive meaning from information presented creatively in a variety of formats by explaining and discussing films, plays and other creative presentations of information.

     (e) Develop creative methods of conveying information in a variety of formats by expressing information and ideas creatively in simple formats.

     (f) Assess the quality of the process and outcome of the pupil’s efforts to obtain information by retracing the steps the pupil took to find information and explaining which were most useful for resolving a problem or question concerning the information.

     3.  For the areas of recognizing the importance of information to a democratic society, practicing ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology, and participating effectively in groups to pursue and generate information, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information from diverse sources, contexts, disciplines and cultures by identifying several appropriate sources for resolving an information problem or question.

     (b) Respect the principle of equitable access to information by explaining why it is important for all pupils to have access to information, information sources and information technology.

     (c) Respect the principles of intellectual freedom by defining or giving examples of “intellectual freedom.”

     (d) Respect intellectual property rights by giving examples of what it means to respect intellectual property rights.

     (e) Use information technology responsibly by stating the main points of the policy of the pupil’s school regarding the use of computing and communications hardware, software and networks.

     (f) Share and contribute knowledge and information with other pupils in groups by seeking and communicating specific facts, opinions and points of view related to information problems or questions.

     (g) Respect the ideas and backgrounds of other pupils and acknowledge the contributions of other pupils by describing their ideas accurately and completely.

     (h) Collaborate with others, both in person and through technologies, to identify information problems and to seek solutions by:

          (1) Expressing the pupil’s own ideas appropriately and effectively, in person and remotely through technologies, while working in groups to identify and resolve information problems;

          (2) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to analyze information problems and suggest solutions; and

          (3) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to devise solutions to information problems that integrate the information and ideas of group members.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R071-01, eff. 11-1-2001; A by R013-03, 10-30-2003)

     NAC 389.2436  Second grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the second grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for mathematics for the second grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the second grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the second grade in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of the second grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.2437  Second grade: Social studies. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the second grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for social studies offered in public schools. Instruction in the second grade in social studies must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the second grade:

     1.  For the area of social study skills:

     (a) Acquire and apply skills of reading, writing and oral communication to construct knowledge, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Listen for main ideas in text that is read to the pupil.

          (2) Listen for the main idea and sequence of events in the context of social studies.

          (3) Identify fact and opinion.

          (4) Use reading and writing to respond to literature.

          (5) Identify graphic organizers as a method for organizing information.

          (6) Use vocabulary in sentences.

     (b) Acquire, organize, use and evaluate information that prepares a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Research a prescribed topic in social studies.

          (2) Conduct research by locating, gathering and organizing information.

          (3) Present information orally or in writing.

          (4) Use maps, graphs, charts and diagrams.

          (5) Demonstrate acceptable social behaviors when using technology.

          (6) Use technological resources for solving problems, communicating and illustrating thoughts and ideas.

     (c) Demonstrate historical comprehension by analyzing and interpreting historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts and interpretations or perspectives on past events, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate an understanding of chronology by reading a timeline.

          (2) Identify past, present and future events.

          (3) Discuss sources of information that are appropriate.

          (4) Read or listen, or both, to historical fiction.

          (5) Identify different perspectives.

     (d) Demonstrate skills which prepare a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate responsibility for the well-being of himself or herself and his or her family.

          (2) Listen and participate as a member of a group in the classroom.

     2.  For the area of history:

     (a) Understand the development, characteristics and interactions of persons, cultures, societies, religions and ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare the local community to communities from around the United States.

          (2) Examine artifacts in the United States to understand the daily life of persons from the time period of those artifacts.

          (3) Examine artifacts from around the world for important clues to ascertain the daily life of persons from the time period of those artifacts.

          (4) Explain why important events, persons or customs, or any combination thereof, in the United States are recognized by holidays.

          (5) Explain why important events, persons and customs, or any combination thereof, from around the world are recognized by holidays.

          (6) Recognize similarities and differences of earlier generations, including, without limitation, similarities and differences in occupations, clothes, mannerisms, stories, games and festivals.

          (7) Compare communities from around the world to the local community.

     (b) Understand the influences of persons, events, ideas and conflicts in the development of nations, empires, cultures and political and economic ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify methods in which persons cooperate to achieve a common goal.

          (2) Explore the importance of both local and national landmarks and explain how those landmarks create a sense of community.

     (c) Understand the influences of social ideas and personal action on social, political, economic and technological change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify public and private spaces within the community.

          (2) Compare or contrast, or both, the daily life of the pupil with the daily lives of children from around the world.

          (3) Explain why persons and events are honored by commemorative holidays.

          (4) Demonstrate respect for other pupils and persons in the community.

          (5) Define the term “technology” and identify uses for technology in the daily life of the pupil.

          (6) Listen to and discuss events in the community that are reported by the media.

     3.  For the area of geography:

     (a) Use maps, globes and other geographic tools and technologies to locate and extrapolate information about persons, places and environments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify titles and symbols on maps.

          (2) Recognize spatial patterns, including, without limitation, political units and physical features, on a map and globe.

          (3) Construct a key from map symbols and choose a map title.

          (4) Give and follow simple oral directions to move from one location to another.

          (5) Use a simple letter and number grid system to find a specific location.

          (6) Identify geographic information within media sources, including, without limitation, maps, books and photographs.

     (b) Understand the physical and human features of places, and use that information to define and study regions and their patterns of changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Define the term “region” and provide examples of regions.

          (2) Describe neighborhoods and communities as places where persons live, work and play.

          (3) Identify traditions and customs that are practiced by families.  

          (4) Identify patterns of changes in the community.

          (5) Provide examples of geographical uses of machines, tools and technologies, including, without limitation, surveying tools and map navigation programs.

          (6) Demonstrate that different locations have different addresses.

          (7) Locate the city and state in which the pupil resides on a map.

     (c) Understand how economic, political and cultural processes interact to shape patterns of human migration and settlement, influence and interdependence, and conflict and cooperation, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Construct a visual model of the distribution of population, including, without limitation, a graph, table or a choropleth map.

          (2) Categorize different ways to move persons, goods and ideas, including, without limitation, air, water, land, telephones and computers.

          (3) Define the terms “rural community” and “urban community” and compare the characteristics of each.

          (4) List the types of social groups to which persons belong.

     (d) Understand the effects of interactions between human and physical systems, and changes in the use, distribution and importance of resources, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Tell how the physical environment affects community activity, including, without limitation, recreation and water usage.

          (2) Provide examples of tools that assist in finding geographic locations.

          (3) Identify how persons shape their physical environment.

          (4) Define the term “natural hazards” and provide examples of natural hazards.

          (5) Identify natural resources and the location of natural resources in the neighborhood.

     4.  For the area of economics:

     (a) Understand how scarcity and incentives affect choices, how markets work, why markets form, how supply and demand interact to determine the market price, and how changes in prices act as economic signals to coordinate trade, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Give examples of what is given up when a choice is made.

          (2) Identify consumers and where they make purchases.

          (3) Identify producers in the neighborhood and community in which the pupil lives.

          (4) Discuss why persons work.

     (b) Identify indicators used to measure economic performance, understand important aspects of how the economy acts as a system, and understand the roles of money, interest rates, saving and borrowing, financial institutions and the central banking system in the economy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discuss the concept that money is limited.

          (2) Identify reasons for saving money.

     (c) Identify the causes of economic change, and explain how the economic system of the United States responds to those changes and how other economic systems respond to changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify businesses in the community.

          (2) Describe ways to share classroom resources.

     (d) Explore trends in international trade, the impact of trade on the economy of the United States and the role of exchange rates, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to demonstrate an understanding of trade by providing an example of trade.

     5.  For the area of civics:

     (a) Know why society needs rules, law and governments, and understand the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify and follow classroom and school rules concerning behavior and resolution of conflicts.

          (2) Identify a pupil’s rights within the classroom and the school.

          (3) Participate in making decisions for the class, including, without limitation, decisions regarding personal responsibilities in the classroom.

          (4) Recognize the Pledge of Allegiance.

          (5) Describe traditional patriotic activities, holidays or symbols from around the world.

     (b) Understand the United States Constitution and the government created by the United States Constitution, including, without limitation, the relationship between national and sub-national governments, and the structure and function of state and local governments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to name the current President of the United States.

     (c) Describe the roles of political parties, elections, interest groups, the media and public opinion in the democratic process, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify sources of information.

     (d) Explain the different political systems in the world and how those systems relate to the United States and the citizens of the United States, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to name the school in which the pupil is enrolled and the community in which the pupil resides.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R074-00, eff. 6-20-2000; A by R011-09, 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.244  Second grade: Science. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the second grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for science offered in public schools. Instruction in the second grade in science must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the second grade:

     1.  For the area of physical science, understand matter and its interactions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

     (b) Analyze data obtained from testing different materials to determine which materials have the properties that are best suited for an intended purpose.

     (c) Make observations to construct an evidence-based account of how an object made of a small set of pieces can be disassembled and made into a new object.

     (d) Construct an argument with evidence that some changes caused by heating or cooling are able to be reversed and some are not.

     2.  For the area of life science, understand:

     (a) The interactions, energy and dynamics of ecosystems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Plan and conduct an investigation to determine if plants need sunlight and water to grow.

          (2) Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.

     (b) The unity and diversity of biological evolution, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

     3.  For the area of earth science, understand:

     (a) The earth’s place in the universe, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to use information from several sources to provide evidence that events affecting the earth can occur quickly or slowly.

     (b) The earth’s systems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare multiple solutions designed to slow or prevent wind or water from changing the shape of the land.

          (2) Develop a model to illustrate the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area.

          (3) Obtain information to demonstrate where water is found on earth and that water can be solid or liquid.

     4.  For the area of engineering technology, understand design, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Ask questions, make observations and gather information about a situation which persons desire to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of new or improved objects or tools.

     (b) Develop a simple sketch, drawing or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.

     (c) Analyze data from tests of two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of the performance of each object.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R075-99, eff. 11-4-99; A by R041-05, 10-31-2005; R084-13, 6-23-2014; R141-14, 10-27-2015)

Instruction: Third Grade

     NAC 389.247  Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the third grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for the third grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the third grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for English language arts.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the third grade in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of the third grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.248  Information literacy. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the third grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades to be information literate. Instruction in the third grade, regardless of whether it takes place in the library or the classroom, must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards for information literacy by the completion of the third grade:

     1.  For the areas of understanding the process of obtaining information in such a manner as to access information efficiently and effectively, evaluate information critically and competently, and use information accurately and creatively, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Recognize the need for information by:

          (1) Giving examples of situations in which additional information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question;

          (2) Determining whether additional information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question; and

          (3) By selecting examples of accurate and inaccurate information and complete and incomplete information.

     (b) Recognize that accurate and comprehensive information is the basis for intelligent decision making by explaining the differences between accurate and inaccurate information.

     (c) Formulate questions by:

          (1) Stating at least one broad question that will help in finding the needed information; and

          (2) Stating both broad and specific questions that will help in finding the needed information.

     (d) Identify a variety of potential sources of information by listing several sources of information and by explaining the kind of information found in each source.

     (e) Develop and use successful strategies for locating information by listing some ideas for identifying and finding information that is needed.

     (f) Determine accuracy, relevance and comprehensiveness by defining “accuracy,” “relevance” and “comprehensiveness” and giving examples of their applications.

     (g) Distinguish among fact, point of view and opinion by:

          (1) Recognizing those concepts in various sources and products of information; and

          (2) Explaining how those concepts are different from the others.

     (h) Identify inaccurate and misleading information by explaining how such information can lead to faulty conclusions.

     (i) Select information that is appropriate to a specific problem or question by recognizing information that is applicable to that problem or question.

     (j) Organize information for practical application by:

          (1) Describing several ways to organize information, including chronologically, topically and hierarchically; and

          (2) Organizing the information in different ways according to the specific information problem or question.

     (k) Integrate new information into the pupil’s existing knowledge by:

          (1) Recognizing and understanding new information and ideas; and

          (2) Combining what is already known about a topic with new information and drawing conclusions using the combined information.

     (l) Apply information in critical thinking and problem solving by:

          (1) Identifying information that meets a particular need for information; and

          (2) Using information from a variety of sources to resolve an information problem or question.

     (m) Produce and communicate information and ideas in appropriate formats by:

          (1) Naming a variety of different formats for presenting different kinds of information; and

          (2) Choosing an appropriate format for presenting information from a variety of sources based on the information itself, the audience, and the nature of the information problem or question to determine the applicability of that format to a specific information problem or question.

     2.  For the areas of pursuing information related to personal interests, appreciating literature and other creative expressions of information, and striving for excellence in seeking information and generating knowledge, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information relating to various dimensions of personal well-being, such as vocational interests, involvement in community, matters concerning health and recreational pursuits by:

          (1) Occasionally seeking information about topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being; and

          (2) Generally expanding beyond the pupil’s own knowledge to seek information concerning topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being.

     (b) Design, develop and evaluate information and conclusions based upon that information relating to topics of personal interest to the pupil by:

          (1) Organizing and presenting basic information gathered by the pupil relating to those topics of personal interest; and

          (2) Creating solutions and methods of conveying information concerning those topics of personal interest.

     (c) Function as a competent and self-motivated reader by:

          (1) Explaining and discussing various examples of fiction; and

          (2) Choosing fiction and other types of literature to read and analyze.

     (d) Derive meaning from information presented creatively in a variety of formats by explaining and discussing films, plays and other creative presentations of information.

     (e) Develop creative methods of conveying information in a variety of formats by:

          (1) Expressing information and ideas creatively in simple formats; and

          (2) Expressing information and ideas creatively in ways that combine several formats.

     (f) Assess the quality of the process and outcome of the pupil’s efforts to obtain information by:

          (1) Retracing the steps the pupil took to obtain information and explaining which were most useful for resolving a problem or question concerning the information; and

          (2) Assessing each step the pupil took to obtain information with respect to a specific problem concerning the information and assessing the result.

     (g) Devise basic strategies for revising, improving and updating self-generated knowledge by explaining those basic strategies.

     3.  For the areas of recognizing the importance of information to a democratic society, practicing ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology, and participating effectively in groups to pursue and generate information, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information from diverse sources, contexts, disciplines and cultures by identifying several appropriate sources for resolving an information problem or question.

     (b) Respect the principle of equitable access to information by:

          (1) Explaining why it is important for all pupils to have access to information, information sources and information technology; and

          (2) Using information, information sources and information technology efficiently so that they are available for other pupils to use.

     (c) Respect the principles of intellectual freedom by:

          (1) Defining or giving examples of “intellectual freedom”; and

          (2) Analyzing a situation in terms of its relationship to intellectual freedom, including, without limitation, issuing a personal opinion of a book or video in the library media center.

     (d) Respect intellectual property rights by:

          (1) Giving examples of what it means to respect intellectual property rights; and

          (2) Analyzing situations to determine the steps necessary to respect intellectual property rights, including, without limitation, the creation of a term paper or the development of a multimedia product.

     (e) Use information technology responsibly by stating the main points of the policy of the pupil’s school regarding the use of computing and communications hardware, software and networks.

     (f) Share and contribute knowledge and information with other pupils in groups by:

          (1) Seeking and communicating specific facts, opinions and points of view related to information problems or questions; and

          (2) Using information sources and selecting information and ideas that will contribute directly to the success of group projects.

     (g) Respect the ideas and backgrounds of other pupils and acknowledge their contributions by:

          (1) Describing the ideas of other pupils accurately and completely; and

          (2) Encouraging consideration of ideas and information from all group members.

     (h) Collaborate with others, both in person and through technologies, to identify information problems and to seek solutions by:

          (1) Expressing the pupil’s own ideas appropriately and effectively, in person and remotely through technologies, while working in groups to identify and resolve information problems;

          (2) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to analyze information problems and suggest solutions; and

          (3) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to devise solutions to information problems that integrate the information and ideas of group members.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R071-01, eff. 11-1-2001; A by R013-03, 10-30-2003)

     NAC 389.252  Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the third grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for mathematics for the third grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the third grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2013-2014 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the third grade in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of the third grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012; A by R019-11, 5-30-2012, eff. 7-1-2013)

     NAC 389.254  Social studies. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the third grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for social studies offered in public schools. Instruction in the third grade in social studies must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the third grade:

     1.  For the area of social study skills:

     (a) Acquire and apply skills of reading, writing and oral communication to construct knowledge, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use prereading strategies to skim text for main ideas.

          (2) Identify main ideas and the sequences of events in the context of social studies.

          (3) Use reading and writing to respond to literature.

          (4) Identify fact and opinion.

          (5) Increase comprehension using graphic organizers.

          (6) Use content specific vocabulary in sentences.

     (b) Acquire, organize, use and evaluate information that prepares a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Research a prescribed topic in social studies.

          (2) Conduct research by locating, gathering and organizing information.

          (3) Present information orally and in writing.

          (4) Read maps, graphs, charts and diagrams for information.

          (5) Demonstrate acceptable social and ethical behaviors when using technology and discuss the consequences of the inappropriate use of technology.

          (6) Use technological resources for solving problems, communicating and illustrating thoughts and ideas.

          (7) Use technology to effectively access information.

     (c) Demonstrate historical comprehension by analyzing and interpreting historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts and interpretations or perspectives on past events, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate an understanding of chronology by reading a timeline.

          (2) Read and discuss historical fiction.

          (3) Identify different perspectives.

     (d) Demonstrate skills which prepare a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate responsibility for the well-being of himself or herself and his or her family.

          (2) Listen and participate as a member of a group in the classroom.

     2.  For the area of history:

     (a) Understand the development, characteristics and interactions of persons, cultures, societies, religions and ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Learn about persons in the community and discuss the contributions of those persons to the community.

          (2) Use artifacts and other primary resources to investigate the contributions of persons and families to the founding and development of the local community.

          (3) Learn about persons from around the world and discuss the contributions of those persons.

     (b) Understand the influences of persons, events, ideas and conflicts in the development of nations, empires, cultures and political and economic ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discuss the resolution of conflicts through compromise.

          (2) Explain how memorials honor and remember persons.

     (c) Understand the influences of social ideas and personal action on social, political, economic and technological change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain how the actions of heroes and heroines make a difference.

          (2) Determine what it means to be a citizen of the United States and describe the achievements of famous and ordinary citizens.

          (3) Define the term “ethnicity” and explain that persons who make contributions to their communities include persons who have diverse ethnic origins, customs and traditions.

          (4) Demonstrate respect for other pupils, the community and the world.

          (5) Explain how technology in the pupil’s home and school affects the pupil’s life.

          (6) Discuss the effects of events reported by the media on persons in the community.

     3.  For the area of geography:

     (a) Use maps, globes and other geographic tools and technologies to locate and extrapolate information about persons, places and environments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify and use the cardinal directions on a compass rose to locate places on a map.

          (2) Differentiate between a city and a state using appropriate examples.

          (3) Compare uses of maps and globes.

          (4) Identify and explain simple spatial patterns on a map, including, without limitation, population centers, farmland and mountains.

          (5) Construct a simple map which includes, without limitation, a title, symbols and directions from a bird’s-eye view.

          (6) Recognize different types of maps, including, without limitation, maps of the neighborhood, school and classroom.

          (7) List careers that require the use of geographic tools.

     (b) Understand the physical and human features of places, and use that information to define and study regions and their patterns of changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Distinguish between physical and human features.

          (2) Identify characteristics of neighborhoods and communities, including, without limitation, the physical and geographical differences, land use and population density.

          (3) Identify ways persons can express their culture.

          (4) List ways persons view their own communities, including, without limitation, a ranching community and a tourist destination.

          (5) List ways persons use technology for geographic purposes, including, without limitation, for forecasting the weather and taking aerial photographs to measure changes in population over a period of time.

          (6) Locate and name the states that surround Nevada.

          (7) Identify latitude and longitude on a map or globe.

     (c) Understand how economic, political and cultural processes interact to shape patterns of human migration and settlement, influence and interdependence, and conflict and cooperation, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare population distribution across regions using maps and mathematical representations, including, without limitation, tables and graphs.

          (2) Identify the types of transportation and communication networks.  

          (3) List reasons for choosing to live in urban and rural communities.

          (4) Use a map to display information about an economic product.

          (5) Describe the purposes for various organizations.

     (d) Understand the effects of interactions between human and physical systems, and changes in the use, distribution and importance of resources, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Predict possible geographic changes that could take place in the neighborhood or community.

          (2) List tools, machines or technologies that persons use to change the physical environment.

          (3) Compare ways persons modify the physical environment.

          (4) Identify persons, groups and organizations that respond to natural hazards.

          (5) Describe ways persons depend on and manage natural resources within their communities.

     4.  For the area of economics:

     (a) Understand how scarcity and incentives affect choices, how markets work, why markets form, how supply and demand interact to determine the market price and how changes in prices act as economic signals to coordinate trade, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify needs as high priority wants and identify wants as goods, service or leisure activities.

          (2) Give examples of the prices consumers have paid when buying goods and services.

          (3) Give examples of the prices set by businesses for selling goods and services.

          (4) Demonstrate an understanding of income and give examples.

     (b) Identify indicators used to measure economic performance, understand important aspects of how the economy acts as a system, and understand the roles of money, interest rates, saving and borrowing, financial institutions and the central banking system in the economy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify forms of money used by persons across time and in different places.

          (2) Define terms used in banking, including, without limitation, “saving,” “interest” and “borrowing.”

          (3) Identify reasons persons use banks.

     (c) Identify the causes of economic change, and explain how the economic system of the United States responds to those changes and how other economic systems respond to changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify and explain what business owners do.

          (2) Identify classroom resources that are limited and must be shared.

     (d) Explore trends in international trade, the impact of trade on the economy of the United States and the role of exchange rates, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to differentiate between barter and monetary trade.

     5.  For the area of civics:

     (a) Know why society needs rules, law and governments, and understand the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify rules, laws and authorities that keep persons safe and property secure and discuss examples of each.

          (2) Discuss that the democratic process involves voting, majority rule and the setting of rules.

          (3) Explain personal responsibilities in the classroom and the school.

          (4) Recognize the Pledge of Allegiance and discuss its purpose.

          (5) Explain why we have patriotic activities, holidays and symbols.

     (b) Understand the United States Constitution and the government created by the United States Constitution, including, without limitation, the relationship between national and sub-national governments, and the structure and function of state and local governments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Name the current President of the United States.

          (2) Name the current mayor of the town in which the pupil resides, if applicable.

     (c) Describe the roles of political parties, elections, interest groups, the media and public opinion in the democratic process, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) List the qualities of a leader.

          (2) Discuss why persons form interest groups.

          (3) Introduce sources of information which persons use to form an opinion.

     (d) Explain the different political systems in the world and how those systems relate to the United States and the citizens of the United States, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify the city, state and country in which the pupil resides.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R074-00, eff. 6-20-2000; A by R011-09, 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.272  The arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the third grade, each pupil must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for courses in the arts offered in public elementary schools. Instruction in the arts in the third grade must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards of performance by the completion of the third grade:

     1.  For the area of music:

     (a) Sing a varied repertoire of music alone and with others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Sing folk songs, patriotic songs and multicultural songs with the correct pitch and mood using the head tone;

          (2) Sing simple ostinatos on pitch; and

          (3) Maintain a part while singing a round in an ensemble.

     (b) Perform a varied repertoire of music on instruments alone and with others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Play a melodic or rhythmic pattern on instruments in the classroom using the proper technique; and

          (2) Accompany simple folk, traditional and multicultural music using accurate rhythmic and melodic patterns.

     (c) Improvise melodies, variations and accompaniments as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to improvise a rhythmic and melodic phrase while maintaining a steady beat.

     (d) Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Organize sounds into musical interpretations of stories, rhymes and poetry in large groups;

          (2) With assistance from the teacher, create a two-phrase song or instrumental piece with a beginning, middle and end using a pentatonic scale; and

          (3) Organize simple pieces of music using a variety of sound sources.

     (e) Read and notate music as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Read quarter notes, quarter rests and eighth notes and perform through speaking, body percussion and instruments that are out of pitch;

          (2) Sing and play simple pentatonic patterns using solfege, numbers or letters;

          (3) Use music symbols such as fermata, repeat signs and double bar lines;

          (4) Notate a simple oral rhythmic pattern; and

          (5) Notate a simple oral melodic pattern.

     (f) Listen to, analyze and describe music as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify rhythmic and melodic patterns that are repeated within a musical piece;

          (2) Describe a simple musical form;

          (3) Recognize the difference in vocal timbres among the male and female voices of children when presented separately; and

          (4) Recognize instruments that are out of pitch in a musical example.

     (g) Evaluate music and musical performances as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use criteria provided by the teacher to evaluate performances and compositions; and

          (2) Evaluate performances and compositions in his or her own words.

     (h) Demonstrate knowledge of the historical periods and cultural diversity of music, including, without limitation, the ability to:

          (1) Identify various styles of music from diverse cultures; and

          (2) Recognize that various styles of music are used in different settings.

     2.  For the area of theater:

     (a) Understand the components of a theatrical production, including, without limitation, scriptwriting, directing and production as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Write or improvise a simple script based on personal experience, imagination or the retelling of a story;

          (2) Create simple sets and sound effects for a dramatized idea or story; and

          (3) Create props, costumes, masks or makeup for a dramatized idea or story.

     (b) Understand and demonstrate the role of an actor in the theater as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify two of the different traits of a given person, animal or object;

          (2) Portray two of the traits of a given person, animal or object; and

          (3) Vocally and physically portray in a dramatized idea or story the varied emotions of a character.

     (c) Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in theater, film, television and electronic media as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Express opinions related to a performance of another student or a visiting artist; and

          (2) Differentiate between what is real and what is make-believe.

     (d) Recognize and explain how theatrical experiences contribute to a better understanding of history, culture and human relationships as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to state the similarities and differences between dramatic characters and real people.

     3.  For the area of visual arts:

     (a) Know and apply media, techniques and processes for developing visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to create works of visual art using different media, techniques and processes and meeting most criteria assigned by the teacher.

     (b) Use knowledge of the characteristics, purposes and functions of the visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify selected elements and principles of design in nature and works of visual art; and

          (2) Create works of visual art using various visual characteristics of visual art.

     (c) Choose, apply and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas for visual art as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to create works of visual art that demonstrate a choice of subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning through such works.

     (d) Understand the visual arts in relation to history and culture as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Match a work of visual art to a particular culture, time or place; and

          (2) Create a work of visual art that is influenced by a particular historical period or culture.

     (e) Analyze and assess characteristics, merits and meaning in the pupil’s own works of visual art and the works of others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to brainstorm possible meanings for a work of visual art.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.284  Science. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the third grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for science offered in public schools. Instruction in the third grade in science must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the third grade:

     1.  For the area of physical science, understand the forces and interactions which affect motion and stability, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.

     (b) Make observations or measurements of an object’s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.

     (c) Ask questions to determine the cause and effect of electrical or magnetic interactions between two objects that do not make contact.

     (d) Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific concepts about magnets.

     2.  For the area of life science, understand:

     (a) The structures and processes from molecules to organisms, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to develop models to illustrate that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but that each organism experiences birth, growth, reproduction and death.

     (b) The interactions, energy and dynamics of ecosystems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to construct arguments that some animals form groups that help members of the same species survive.

     (c) The inheritance and variation of traits of heredity, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals, including humans, have traits inherited from their parents and that variations of these traits exist in a group of similar organisms.

          (2) Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.

     (d) The unity and diversity of biological evolution, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the existence of organisms and the environments in which they lived.

          (2) Use evidence to explain how the variations in characteristics among members of the same species may provide advantages to their ability to survive, find mates and reproduce.

          (3) Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms are able to survive better than others and some are not able to survive.

          (4) Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem that is caused by a change in the environment that may cause the types of plants and animals that live in that environment to change.

     3.  For the area of earth science, understand:

     (a) The earth’s systems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.

          (2) Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.

     (b) The earth and human activity on earth, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to make claims about the merits of design solutions that reduce the impact of weather-related hazards.

     4.  For the area of engineering technology, understand design, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Define a simple design problem which reflects a need or desire and includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time or cost.

     (b) Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on the likelihood that each solution meets the criteria and constraints of the problem.

     (c) Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that may be improved.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R084-13, eff. 6-23-2014; A by R141-14, 10-27-2015)

Instruction: Fourth Grade

     NAC 389.2931  Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the fourth grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for the fourth grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the fourth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for English language arts offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the fourth grade in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of the fourth grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.2932  Information literacy. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the fourth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades to be information literate. Instruction in the fourth grade, regardless of whether it takes place in the library or the classroom, must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards for information literacy by the completion of the fourth grade:

     1.  For the areas of understanding the process of obtaining information in such a manner as to access information efficiently and effectively, evaluate information critically and competently, and use information accurately and creatively, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Recognize the need for information by:

          (1) Giving examples of situations in which additional information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question; and

          (2) Determining whether additional information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question.

     (b) Recognize that accurate and comprehensive information is the basis for intelligent decision making by:

          (1) Selecting examples of accurate and inaccurate information and complete and incomplete information; and

          (2) Explaining the difference between accurate and inaccurate information and complete and incomplete information.

     (c) Formulate questions by:

          (1) Stating at least one broad question that will help in finding the needed information; and

          (2) Stating both broad and specific questions that will help in finding the needed information.

     (d) Identify a variety of potential sources of information by:

          (1) Listing several sources of information and explaining the kind of information found in each source; and

          (2) Brainstorming a range of sources of information that will meet a need for information.

     (e) Develop and use successful strategies for locating information by:

          (1) Listing some ideas for identifying and finding the needed information; and

          (2) Explaining and applying a plan to access the needed information.

     (f) Determine accuracy, relevance and comprehensiveness by:

          (1) Defining the terms “accuracy,” “relevance” and “comprehensiveness” and giving examples of their applications; and

          (2) Comparing and contrasting sources related to a topic.

     (g) Distinguish among fact, point of view and opinion by:

          (1) Recognizing those concepts in various sources and products of information; and

          (2) Explaining how each concept is different from the others.

     (h) Identify inaccurate and misleading information by:

          (1) Recognizing inaccurate and misleading information in sources and products of information; and

          (2) Explaining how such information can lead to faulty conclusions.

     (i) Select information that is appropriate to a specific problem or question by:

          (1) Recognizing information that is applicable to that problem or question; and

          (2) Analyzing information from a variety of sources to determine its applicability to that problem or question.

     (j) Organize information for practical application by:

          (1) Describing several ways to organize information, including chronologically, topically and hierarchically; and

          (2) Organizing the information in different ways according to the specific information problem or question.

     (k) Integrate new information into the pupil’s existing knowledge by:

          (1) Recognizing and understanding new information and ideas; and

          (2) Combining what is already known about a topic with new information and drawing conclusions using the combined information.

     (l) Apply information in critical thinking and problem solving by:

          (1) Identifying information that meets a particular need for information; and

          (2) Using information from a variety of sources to resolve an information problem or question.

     (m) Produce and communicate information and ideas in appropriate formats by:

          (1) Naming a variety of different formats for presenting different kinds of information; and

          (2) Choosing an appropriate format for presenting information based on the information itself, the audience, and the nature of the information problem or question.

     2.  For the areas of pursuing information related to personal interests, appreciating literature and other creative expressions of information, and striving for excellence in seeking information and generating knowledge, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information relating to various dimensions of personal well-being, such as vocational interests, involvement in community, matters concerning health and recreational pursuits by:

          (1) Occasionally seeking information about topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being;

          (2) Generally expanding beyond the pupil’s own knowledge to seek information concerning topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being; and

          (3) Exploring a range of sources to obtain information concerning topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being.

     (b) Design, develop and evaluate information and conclusions based upon that information relating to topics of personal interest to the pupil by:

          (1) Organizing and presenting basic information gathered by the pupil relating to those topics of personal interest; and

          (2) Creating solutions and methods of conveying information concerning those topics of personal interest.

     (c) Function as a competent and self-motivated reader by:

          (1) Explaining and discussing various examples of fiction;

          (2) Choosing fiction and other types of literature to read and analyze; and

          (3) Reading avidly and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of literature read.

     (d) Derive meaning from information presented creatively in a variety of formats by explaining and discussing films, plays and other creative presentations of information.

     (e) Develop creative methods of conveying information in a variety of formats by:

          (1) Expressing information and ideas creatively in simple formats; and

          (2) Expressing information and ideas creatively in ways that combine several formats.

     (f) Assess the quality of the process and outcome of the pupil’s efforts to obtain information by:

          (1) Retracing the steps the pupil took to obtain information and explaining which were most useful for resolving a problem or question concerning the information; and

          (2) Assessing each step the pupil took to obtain information with respect to a specific problem concerning the information and assessing the result.

     (g) Devise basic strategies for revising, improving and updating self-generated knowledge by explaining those strategies.

     3.  For the areas of recognizing the importance of information to a democratic society, practicing ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology, and participating effectively in groups to pursue and generate information, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information from diverse sources, contexts, disciplines and cultures by:

          (1) Identifying several appropriate sources for resolving an information problem or question; and

          (2) Using a variety of sources covering diverse perspectives to resolve an information problem or question.

     (b) Respect the principle of equitable access to information by:

          (1) Explaining why it is important for all pupils to have access to information, information sources and information technology; and

          (2) Using information, information sources and information technology efficiently so that they are available for other pupils to use.

     (c) Respect the principles of intellectual freedom by:

          (1) Defining or giving examples of “intellectual freedom”; and

          (2) Analyzing a situation in terms of its relationship to intellectual freedom, including, without limitation, issuing a personal opinion of a book or video in the library media center.

     (d) Respect intellectual property rights by:

          (1) Giving examples of what it means to respect intellectual property rights; and

          (2) Analyzing situations to determine the steps necessary to respect intellectual property rights, including, without limitation, the creation of a term paper or the development of a multimedia product.

     (e) Use information technology responsibly by:

          (1) Stating the main points of the policy of the pupil’s school regarding the use of computing and communications hardware, software and networks; and

          (2) Locating appropriate information efficiently with the school’s computing and communications hardware, software and networks.

     (f) Share and contribute knowledge and information with other pupils in groups by:

          (1) Seeking and communicating specific facts, opinions and points of view related to information problems or questions; and

          (2) Using information sources and selecting information and ideas that will contribute directly to the success of group projects.

     (g) Respect the ideas and backgrounds of other pupils and acknowledge their contributions by:

          (1) Describing the ideas of other pupils accurately and completely; and

          (2) Encouraging consideration of ideas and information from all group members.

     (h) Collaborate with others, both in person and through technologies, to identify information problems and to seek solutions by:

          (1) Expressing the pupil’s own ideas appropriately and effectively, in person and remotely through technologies, while working in groups to identify and resolve information problems;

          (2) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to analyze information problems and suggest solutions; and

          (3) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to devise solutions to information problems that integrate the information and ideas of group members.

     (i) Collaborate with others, both in person and through technologies, to design, develop and evaluate products and solutions of information to create and evaluate simple products of information.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R071-01, eff. 11-1-2001; A by R013-03, 10-30-2003)

     NAC 389.2933  Social studies. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the fourth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything in the previous grades for social studies offered in public schools. Instruction in the fourth grade in social studies must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the fourth grade:

     1.  For the area of social study skills:

     (a) Acquire and apply skills of reading, writing and oral communication to construct knowledge, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Skim text for main ideas.

          (2) Identify the main idea, sequence of events, and cause and effect in the context of social studies.

          (3) Identify fact and opinion.

          (4) Use reading and writing to respond to historical literature.

          (5) Increase comprehension by taking notes and using graphic organizers.

     (b) Acquire, organize, use and evaluate information that prepares a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Ask questions to identify a research topic.

          (2) Conduct research by locating, gathering and organizing information.

          (3) Present information orally and in writing.

          (4) Create maps, graphs, charts and diagrams to demonstrate knowledge.

          (5) Demonstrate acceptable social and ethical behaviors when using technology and discuss the consequences of the inappropriate use of technology.

          (6) Use technological tools for personal and collaborative writing, communication and publishing.

          (7) Use technology to efficiently and effectively access information.

     (c) Demonstrate historical comprehension by analyzing and interpreting historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts and interpretations or perspectives on past events, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate an understanding of chronology by recording events on a timeline.

          (2) Read folk tales and legends regarding the history of Nevada.

          (3) Discuss multiple perspectives of history.

     (d) Demonstrate skills which prepare a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate responsibility for the well-being of himself or herself and his or her family.

          (2) Listen and participate as a member of a group in the classroom.

          (3) Participate as a member of the school community.

     2.  For the area of history:

     (a) Understand the development, characteristics and interaction of persons, cultures, societies, religions and ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the lifestyles of the Desert Archaic culture of Nevada.

          (2) Define the term “hunter-gatherer.”

          (3) Describe the lifestyles of the Native American cultures of Nevada.

          (4) Discuss the interactions of pioneers with the Native Americans in the Great Basin region.

          (5) Identify the contributions of immigrants in Nevada.

     (b) Understand the influences of persons, events, ideas and conflicts in the development of nations, empires, cultures and political and economic ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discuss examples of compromise and conflict within Nevada, including, without limitation, the Pyramid Lake Wars, water allocation and the Sagebrush Rebellion.

          (2) Describe the experiences of pioneers who moved west.

          (3) Identify explorers and settlers in preterritorial Nevada.

          (4) Identify the diversity within the population of early settlers in Nevada and discuss their experiences.

          (5) Explain the symbols, mottos and slogans related to Nevada, including, without limitation, the phrase “Battle Born,” the State Seal and the phrase “Silver State.”

          (6) Explain how the conflicts of the United States affected life and society in Nevada.

     (c) Understand the influences of social ideas and personal action on social, political, economic and technological change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare or contrast, or both, the daily life of the pupil to children who lived in Nevada in the past.

          (2) Recognize that communities include persons who have diverse ethnic origins, customs and traditions.

          (3) Recognize persons in the community who make contributions to Nevada.

          (4) Define the term “social responsibility.”

          (5) Explain how advances in technologies have affected Nevada, including, without limitation, advances in railroads, mining and gaming.

          (6) Discuss major events at the local and state level that are reported by the media.

     (d) Understand the interactions and interdependence among nations around the world and the impact of economics, politics, religions and cultures on international relationships, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to describe the economic and cultural influences of other nations on Nevada.

     3.  For the area of geography:

     (a) Use maps, globes and other geographic tools and technologies to locate and extrapolate information about persons, places and environments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify and use intermediate directions on a compass rose to locate places on a map of Nevada.

          (2) Identify spatial patterns on a map of Nevada, including, without limitation, deserts, mountains and populations.

          (3) Construct a map of Nevada displaying human and physical features.

          (4) Use different types of maps of Nevada to understand spatial distribution, including, without limitation, population maps and physical maps.

     (b) Understand the physical and human features of places, and use that information to define and study regions and their patterns of changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the distinguishing features of the historical regions of Nevada, including, without limitation, the tribal territories of Native Americans, pioneer trails and settlement areas.

          (2) Identify the regional changes in Nevada over a period of time.

          (3) Identify and describe the diversity and cultural traditions of the residents of Nevada, including, without limitation, Native Americans and the Basque community.

          (4) Demonstrate how regional change in Nevada from one decade to the next decade has affected the characteristics of a place, including, without limitation, how plows allow farmers to prepare the land for planting and how pick axes assist in mining operations.

          (5) Locate the counties of Nevada and their county seats.

          (6) Identify the equator, prime meridian and international date line.

     (c) Understand how economic, political and cultural processes interact to shape patterns of human migration and settlement, influence and interdependence, and conflict and cooperation, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe differences in the distribution of population within regions of Nevada.

          (2) List examples of the movement of persons, goods and ideas into and across Nevada.

          (3) Describe the differences among rural, suburban and urban settlements in Nevada.

          (4) Describe historical and current economic issues in Nevada using geographic resources, including, without limitation, illustrating demographic changes due to mining and gaming.

          (5) Describe why types of organizations may differ by geographic region in Nevada.

     (d) Understand the effects of interactions between human and physical systems, and changes in the use, distribution and importance of resources, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe ways physical environments affect human activity in Nevada using historical and contemporary examples.

          (2) Describe how technologies altered the physical environment in Nevada and the effects those changes have on the residents of Nevada.

          (3) Explore the impact of human modifications to the physical environment of Nevada on the residents of Nevada.

          (4) Identify natural hazards in Nevada and the impact of those hazards on the population of Nevada.

          (5) Describe the distribution patterns of natural resources in Nevada.

     4.  For the area of economics:

     (a) Understand how scarcity and incentives affect choices, how markets work, why markets form, how supply and demand interact to determine the market price and how changes in prices act as economic signals to coordinate trade, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Give examples of incentives and determine whether those incentives are positive or negative.

          (2) Give reasons why consumers choose to purchase a good or service, including, without limitation, why consumers purchase more of a good or service when the price for the good or service is low and why consumers purchase less of a good or service when the price for the good or service is high.

          (3) Identify factors within the control of a person that affect the likelihood of employment.

          (4) Explain why persons who trade must benefit from the trade, including, without limitation, trading lunch items.

     (b) Identify indicators used to measure economic performance, understand important aspects of how the economy acts as a system, and understand the roles of money, interest rates, saving and borrowing, financial institutions and the central banking system in the economy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discuss how the discovery of silver in Nevada affected the forms of money in circulation.

          (2) Identify instances in which persons might pay interest or receive interest.

          (3) Discuss the reasons persons use banks.

          (4) Define the term “productive resources.”

          (5) Define the term “per capita.”

     (c) Identify the causes of economic change, and explain how the economic system of the United States responds to those changes and how other economic systems respond to changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify a for-profit and a not-for-profit organization within the community and a service each such organization provides.

          (2) Define the term “entrepreneur” and identify entrepreneurs in Nevada.

          (3) Describe resources that are limited in Nevada and ways in which resources are shared.

     (d) Explore trends in international trade, the impact of trade on the economy of the United States and the role of exchange rates, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Define the terms “imports” and “exports.”

          (2) Identify goods that would not be readily available in Nevada without international trade.

     5.  For the area of civics:

     (a) Know why society needs rules, law and governments, and understand the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify rules, laws and authorities that keep persons safe and property secure in Nevada and discuss examples of each.

          (2) Explain that democracy involves voting, majority rule and setting rules.

          (3) Describe the criteria for Nevada residency.

          (4) Discuss the symbolic importance of the Pledge of Allegiance.

          (5) Explain why we celebrate Nevada Day.

     (b) Understand the United States Constitution and the government created by the United States Constitution, including, without limitation, the relationship between national and sub-national governments, and the structure and function of state and local governments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the relationship between classroom rules and school rules.

          (2) Name the current President of the United States.

          (3) Name the current Governor of Nevada.

          (4) Explain why local governments are created.

          (5) Name the three branches of State Government.

          (6) Understand the role of courts.

     (c) Describe the roles of political parties, elections, interest groups, the media and public opinion in the democratic process, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the qualities of a leader.

          (2) Define and give examples of state and local interest groups.

          (3) Identify sources of information persons use to form opinions.

     (d) Explain the different political systems in the world and how those systems relate to the United States and the citizens of the United States, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify the county, city, state and country in which the pupil resides.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R011-09, eff. 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.2935  Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the fourth grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for mathematics for the fourth grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the fourth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2013-2014 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the fourth grade in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of the fourth grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012; A by R019-11, 5-30-2012, eff. 7-1-2013)

     NAC 389.2936  Science. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the fourth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for science offered in public schools. Instruction in the fourth grade in science must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the fourth grade:

     1.  For the area of physical science, understand:

     (a) Energy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use evidence to explain the relationship between the speed of an object and the energy of that object.

          (2) Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from one place to another by sound, light, heat and electrical currents.

          (3) Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.

          (4) Apply scientific concepts to design, test and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.

     (b) Waves and their application in technology for the transfer of information, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop a model of waves to demonstrate patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength and that waves can cause objects to move.

          (2) Develop a model to demonstrate that light reflecting from objects and entering the eye allows objects to be seen.

          (3) Generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information.

     2.  For the area of life science, understand the structures and processes from molecules to organisms, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior and reproduction.

     (b) Use a model to demonstrate that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brains and respond to the information in different ways.

     3.  For the area of earth science, understand:

     (a) The earth’s place in the universe, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to identify evidence of change in the earth from patterns in rock formations and fossils in layers of rock to support an explanation for changes that have occurred in a landscape over time.

     (b) The earth’s systems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Make observations or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering on the earth or the rate of its erosion by water, ice, wind or vegetation.

          (2) Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of the earth’s features.

     (c) The earth and human activity on earth, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and that their uses affect the environment.

          (2) Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural earth processes on humans.

     4.  For the area of engineering technology, understand design, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Define a simple design problem which reflects a need or desire and includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time or cost.

     (b) Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each solution is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

     (c) Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that may be improved.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R084-13, eff. 6-23-2014; A by R141-14, 10-27-2015)

Instruction Through Fifth Grade

     NAC 389.2938  Third through fifth grades: Health. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  Instruction in third grade, fourth grade and fifth grade in health must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the fifth grade:

     1.  Comprehend concepts related to the promotion of health and the prevention of disease to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Describe the relationship between behaviors concerning the health of a person and personal health;

     (b) Explain the basic structure, function and developmental processes of the systems of the human body, including, without limitation, the human reproductive system in accordance with NRS 389.065;

     (c) Describe the physical, emotional and intellectual differences of persons and how those differences affect the well-being of those persons;

     (d) Identify the nutrients that are essential to a person’s health, the functions served by such nutrients and the role those nutrients have in the promotion of health;

     (e) Identify the health-related components of an active lifestyle;

     (f) Explain how the use of substances can affect the way a person makes decisions and performs tasks;

     (g) Describe methods for preventing injuries and avoiding hazards common to children;

     (h) Explain the safety procedures a person can take when confronted with violence or other hazards;

     (i) Differentiate between contagious and noncontagious diseases and illnesses and explain ways to prevent and control those diseases and illnesses;

     (j) Identify programs that are designed to promote community health, including, without limitation, recycling, proper disposal of garbage and trash, and water conservation; and

     (k) Explain the relationship between the environment and:

          (1) Positive behaviors concerning the health of a person; and

          (2) The prevention of injury, illness, disease and premature death.

     2.  Access reliable health information, products and services to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Locate resources which provide reliable health information, including, without limitation, resources from home, school and the community; and

     (b) Describe situations which require services from providers of health care.

     3.  Practice health-enhancing behaviors and avoid and reduce health risks, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Demonstrate behaviors that avoid or reduce health risks;

     (b) Demonstrate the ability to interpret information regarding nutrition, including, without limitation, food labels;

     (c) Engage in behaviors that promote physical activity;

     (d) Explain how substances can affect the way people make decisions and perform tasks;

     (e) Describe basic procedures in first aid and proper responses to common emergency situations;

     (f) Assess situations and practices that are dangerous and situations and practices that are not dangerous; and

     (g) Demonstrate personal health care practices that prevent the spread of communicable diseases and chronic diseases.

     4.  Analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology and other factors on behaviors concerning health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify how different sources affect a person’s thoughts, feelings and behaviors concerning health;

     (b) Discuss nutrition and physical activity habits in diverse cultures;

     (c) Describe the influence of sources, including, without limitation, family, peers and information, on the practice and behaviors of a person;

     (d) Describe the influence of technology on the health of a person and the person’s risk of contracting a disease; and

     (e) Analyze how stated and implied messages from the media influence behaviors concerning health.

     5.  Use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and to reduce or avoid health risks, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Model types of effective verbal and nonverbal communications;

     (b) Discuss ways to communicate with other persons about the stages of growth and development;

     (c) Demonstrate refusal and negotiation skills;

     (d) Recognize refusal skills when the pupil is confronted with situations that are not healthy for the pupil, including, without limitation, situations involving alcohol, tobacco and other drugs; and

     (e) Demonstrate nonviolent strategies to manage or resolve conflicts.

     6.  Use goal-setting skills to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Set short-term personal health goals and long-term personal health goals and track the progress of the pupil in achieving those goals;

     (b) Implement other personal health goals to enhance the daily health habits of the pupil; and

     (c) Compare resources available to a pupil in developing personal health goals, including, without limitation, products for oral health, safety precautions while exposed to the sun and food choices.

     7.  Promote and support personal, family and community health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Describe ways to influence and support a person in making positive health choices; and

     (b) Compare messages regarding consumer and environmental health.

     8.  Use decision-making skills to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply a choice that is healthy when making decisions regarding personal health;

     (b) Predict consequences relating to the use and abuse of substances, including, without limitation, the consequences to the person making the decision and to other persons;

     (c) Predict consequences relating to decisions regarding behaviors concerning the health of a person; and

     (d) Analyze when a person needs assistance in making a decision regarding health.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R032-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R013-09, 10-27-2009) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.2944)

     NAC 389.2939  Fifth grade: Science. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the fifth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for science offered in public schools. Instruction in the fifth grade in science must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the fifth grade:

     1.  For the area of physical science, understand:

     (a) Matter and its interactions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop a model to demonstrate that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.

          (2) Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that, regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved.

          (3) Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

          (4) Conduct an investigation to determine whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances.

     (b) The forces and interactions which affect motion and stability, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by earth on objects is directed down. For the purpose of this paragraph, “down” means the direction that points toward the center of the spherical earth.

     (c) Energy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to use models to demonstrate that energy in the food consumed by animals, which is used for body repair, growth and motion and to maintain body warmth, was once energy from the sun.

     2.  For the area of life science, understand:

     (a) The structures and processes from molecules to organisms, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to support an argument that plants primarily obtain the matter they need for growth from air and water.

     (b) The interactions, energy and dynamics of ecosystems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to develop a model to demonstrate the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers and the environment.

     3.  For the area of earth science, understand:

     (a) The earth’s place in the universe, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Support an argument that differences in the apparent brightness of the sun compared to other stars are because of their relative distances from earth.

          (2) Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in the length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the sky at night.

     (b) The earth’s systems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop a model using an example to demonstrate the ways in which the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere interact.

          (2) Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on earth.

     (c) The earth and human activity on earth, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use scientific concepts to protect the earth’s resources and environment.

     4.  For the area of engineering technology, understand design, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Define a simple design problem which reflects a need or desire and includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time or cost.

     (b) Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each solution is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

     (c) Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that may be improved.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R075-99, eff. 11-4-99; A by R041-05, 10-31-2005; R084-13, 6-23-2014; R141-14, 10-27-2015) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.2947)

     NAC 389.29415  Fifth grade: Information literacy. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the fifth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades to be information literate. Instruction in the fifth grade, regardless of whether it takes place in the library or the classroom, must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards for information literacy by the completion of the fifth grade:

     1.  For the areas of understanding the process of obtaining information in such a manner as to access information efficiently and effectively, evaluate information critically and competently, and use information accurately and creatively, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Recognize the need for information by:

          (1) Giving examples of situations in which additional information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question;

          (2) Determining whether additional information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question; and

          (3) Assessing whether a range of information problems or questions can be resolved based on the pupil’s own knowledge or whether additional information is required.

     (b) Recognize that accurate and comprehensive information is the basis for intelligent decision making by:

          (1) Selecting examples of accurate and inaccurate information and complete and incomplete information; and

          (2) Explaining the difference between accurate and inaccurate information and complete and incomplete information.

     (c) Formulate questions by:

          (1) Stating at least one broad question that will help in finding the needed information; and

          (2) Stating both broad and specific questions that will help in finding the needed information.

     (d) Identify a variety of potential sources of information by:

          (1) Listing several sources of information and explaining the kind of information found in each source;

          (2) Brainstorming a range of sources of information that will meet a need for information; and

          (3) Using a full range of sources of information to meet different needs for information.

     (e) Develop and use successful strategies for locating information by:

          (1) Listing some ideas for identifying and finding information that is needed; and

          (2) Explaining and applying a plan to access information that is needed.

     (f) Determine accuracy, relevance and comprehensiveness by:

          (1) Defining the terms “accuracy,” “relevance” and “comprehensiveness” and giving examples of their applications; and

          (2) Comparing and contrasting sources related to a topic.

     (g) Distinguish among fact, point of view and opinion by:

          (1) Recognizing those concepts in various sources and products of information;

          (2) Explaining how each concept is different from the others; and

          (3) Assembling them, as appropriate, in the pupil’s own work.

     (h) Identify inaccurate and misleading information by:

          (1) Recognizing inaccurate and misleading information in sources and products of information; and

          (2) Explaining how such information can lead to faulty conclusions.

     (i) Select information that is appropriate to a specific problem or question by:

          (1) Recognizing information that is applicable to that problem or question;

          (2) Analyzing information from a variety of sources to determine its applicability to that problem or question; and

          (3) Integrating accurate, relevant and comprehensive information to resolve that information problem or question.

     (j) Organize information for practical application by:

          (1) Describing several ways to organize information, including chronologically, topically and hierarchically;

          (2) Organizing the information in different ways according to the specific information problem or question; and

          (3) Organizing a product of information that presents different types of information in the most effective ways.

     (k) Integrate new information into the pupil’s existing knowledge by:

          (1) Recognizing and understanding new information and ideas;

          (2) Combining what is already known about a topic with new information and drawing conclusions using the combined information; and

          (3) Integrating the pupil’s existing knowledge with information from a variety of sources to create new meaning.

     (l) Apply information in critical thinking and problem solving by:

          (1) Identifying information that meets a particular need for information;

          (2) Using information from a variety of sources to resolve an information problem or question; and

          (3) Devising creative approaches to use information to resolve information problems or questions.

     (m) Produce and communicate information and ideas in appropriate formats by:

          (1) Naming a variety of different formats for presenting different kinds of information;

          (2) Choosing an appropriate format for presenting information based on the information itself, the audience, and the nature of the information problem or question; and

          (3) Choosing the most appropriate format for presenting information and justifying that choice.

     2.  For the areas of pursuing information related to personal interests, appreciating literature and other creative expressions of information, and striving for excellence in seeking information and generating knowledge, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information relating to various dimensions of personal well-being, such as vocational interests, involvement in community, matters concerning health and recreational pursuits by:

          (1) Occasionally seeking information about topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being;

          (2) Generally expanding beyond the pupil’s own knowledge to seek information concerning topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being; and

          (3) Exploring a range of sources to obtain information concerning topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being.

     (b) Design, develop and evaluate information and conclusions based upon that information relating to topics of personal interest to the pupil by:

          (1) Organizing and presenting basic information gathered by the pupil relating to those topics of personal interest;

          (2) Creating solutions and methods of conveying information concerning those topics of personal interest; and

          (3) Judging the quality of the pupil’s own solutions and methods of conveying information concerning those topics of personal interest.

     (c) Function as a competent and self-motivated reader by:

          (1) Explaining and discussing various examples of fiction;

          (2) Choosing fiction and other types of literature to read and analyze; and

          (3) Reading avidly and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of literature read.

     (d) Derive meaning from information presented creatively in a variety of formats by explaining and discussing films, plays and other creative presentations of information.

     (e) Develop creative methods of conveying information in a variety of formats by:

          (1) Expressing information and ideas creatively in simple formats; and

          (2) Expressing information and ideas creatively in ways that combine several formats.

     (f) Assess the quality of the process and outcome of the pupil’s efforts to obtain information by:

          (1) Retracing the steps the pupil took to obtain information and explaining which were most useful for resolving a problem or question concerning the information;

          (2) Assessing each step the pupil took to obtain information with respect to a specific problem concerning the information and assessing the result; and

          (3) Evaluating the process of obtaining information at each step as it occurs and making such adjustments as are necessary to improve both the process and the outcome.

     (g) Devise basic strategies for revising, improving and updating self-generated knowledge by:

          (1) Explaining those strategies; and

          (2) Selecting and applying such strategies as are appropriate.

     3.  For the areas of recognizing the importance of information to a democratic society, practicing ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology, and participating effectively in groups to pursue and generate information, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information from diverse sources, contexts, disciplines and cultures by:

          (1) Identifying several appropriate sources for resolving an information problem or question; and

          (2) Using a variety of sources covering diverse perspectives to resolve an information problem or question.

     (b) Respect the principle of equitable access to information by:

          (1) Explaining why it is important for all pupils to have access to information, information sources and information technology;

          (2) Using information, information sources and information technology efficiently so that they are available for other pupils to use; and

          (3) Proposing strategies for ensuring that pupils and other people have equitable access to information, information sources and information technology.

     (c) Respect the principles of intellectual freedom by:

          (1) Defining or giving examples of “intellectual freedom”; and

          (2) Analyzing a situation in terms of its relationship to intellectual freedom, including, without limitation, issuing a personal opinion of a book or video in the library media center.

     (d) Respect intellectual property rights by:

          (1) Giving examples of what it means to respect intellectual property rights;

          (2) Analyzing situations to determine the steps necessary to respect intellectual property rights, including, without limitation, the creation of a term paper or the development of a multimedia product; and

          (3) Avoiding plagiarism, correctly citing sources and making copies and incorporating text and images only with appropriate approval when creating products of information.

     (e) Use information technology responsibly by:

          (1) Stating the main points of the policy of the pupil’s school regarding the use of computing and communications hardware, software and networks;

          (2) Locating appropriate information efficiently with the school’s computing and communications hardware, software and networks; and

          (3) Following all guidelines and policies of the school relating to the use of computing and communications hardware, software and networks when resolving information problems or questions.

     (f) Share and contribute knowledge and information with other pupils in groups by:

          (1) Seeking and communicating specific facts, opinions and points of view related to information problems or questions;

          (2) Using information sources and selecting information and ideas that will contribute directly to the success of group projects; and

          (3) Integrating the pupil’s own knowledge and information with that of other pupils in the group.

     (g) Respect the ideas and backgrounds of other pupils and acknowledge their contributions by:

          (1) Describing the ideas of other pupils accurately and completely;

          (2) Encouraging consideration of ideas and information from all group members; and

          (3) Helping to organize and integrate the contributions of all the members of the group into products of information.

     (h) Collaborate with others, both in person and through technologies, to identify information problems and to seek solutions by:

          (1) Expressing the pupil’s own ideas appropriately and effectively, in person and remotely through technologies, while working in groups to identify and resolve information problems;

          (2) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to analyze information problems and suggest solutions; and

          (3) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to devise solutions to information problems that integrate the information and ideas of group members.

     (i) Collaborate with others, both in person and through technologies, to design, develop and evaluate products and solutions of information to create and evaluate simple products of information.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R071-01, eff. 11-1-2001; A by R013-03, 10-30-2003)

     NAC 389.2942  Fifth grade: Social studies. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the fifth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for social studies offered in public schools. Instruction in the fifth grade in social studies must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the fifth grade:

     1.  For the area of social studies skills:

     (a) Acquire and apply skills of reading, writing and oral communication to construct knowledge, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Skim text for the main ideas.

          (2) Use reading strategies to identify key words and supporting details to build comprehension.

          (3) Identify cause and effect, and fact and opinion.

          (4) Use reading and writing to respond to historical literature.

          (5) Gather information by making outlines and creating graphic organizers.

     (b) Acquire, organize, use and evaluate information that prepares a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Ask questions to identify a research topic.

          (2) Conduct research by locating, gathering and organizing information using online and print resources.

          (3) Present information orally, in writing and through the use of a multimedia presentation.

          (4) Explain information through the use of maps, graphs, charts and diagrams.

          (5) Demonstrate acceptable social and ethical behaviors when using technology and discuss the consequences of the inappropriate use of technology.

          (6) Use technological tools that are specific for the purpose of supporting learning.

          (7) Evaluate the accuracy, relevancy and bias of online, print and media resources.

     (c) Demonstrate historical comprehension by analyzing and interpreting historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts and interpretations or perspectives on past events, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate an understanding of chronology by creating a timeline and interpreting the events on the timeline.

          (2) Identify and discuss primary and secondary resources.

          (3) Read folk tales and legends regarding the history of America.

          (4) Discuss multiple perspectives of history.

     (d) Demonstrate skills which prepare a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate responsibility for the well-being of himself or herself and his or her family.

          (2) Listen and participate as a member of a group in the classroom.

          (3) Participate as a member of the school community.

     2.  For the area of history:

     (a) Understand the development, characteristics and interaction of persons, cultures, societies, religions and ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify and describe lifeways of Native Americans living in North America and the various cultural regions before European contact.

          (2) Identify and describe the attributes of Native American nations in the local region and in North America.

          (3) Discuss the interactions of early explorers with native cultures.

          (4) Identify the contributions of Native Americans, Europeans and Africans to North American beliefs and traditions.

          (5) Describe the social, political and religious lives of persons in the New England, Middle and Southern colonies.

          (6) Identify persons and groups responsible for founding and settling the American colonies.

          (7) Examine the cultural exchange among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans.

     (b) Understand the influences of persons, events, ideas and conflicts in the development of nations, empires, cultures and political and economic ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the motivations for European exploration of the Americas and describe the expeditions of the European explorers.

          (2) Describe issues of compromise and conflict within the United States.

          (3) Describe the competition among the English, French, Spanish, Dutch and Indian nations for control of North America.

          (4) Explain why slavery was introduced into colonial America.

          (5) Explain how the interactions among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans during colonial America resulted in unique economic, social and political institutions.

          (6) Identify the events that led to the Declaration of Independence.

          (7) Identify the causes, key events and key persons of the American Revolution.

          (8) Explain the relationship between the American colonies and England and discuss the impact of that relationship on the independence of the American colonies.

     (c) Understand the influences of social ideas and personal action on social, political, economic and technological change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare or contrast, or both, the daily lives of children throughout the United States in the past and in the present.

          (2) Recognize that communities include persons who have diverse ethnic origins, customs and traditions.

          (3) Recognize persons in the community who make contributions to the United States.

          (4) Describe ways in which a person displays social responsibility.

          (5) Explain how technologies throughout the history of the United States changed the way persons lived.

          (6) Discuss major events at the local, state, national and global level that are reported by the media and provide an example.

     (d) Understand the interactions and interdependence among nations from around the world and the impact of economics, politics, religions and cultures on international relationships, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to discuss the economic, political and cultural relationships of the United States with other countries.

     3.  For the area of geography:

     (a) Use maps, globes and other geographic tools and technologies to locate and extrapolate information about persons, places and environments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify and locate major geographic features of Nevada and the United States using maps and map elements.

          (2) Identify spatial patterns of the United States.

          (3) Describe the purposes of different types of maps and globes, including, without limitation, topographical, political and physical maps.

          (4) Construct maps, graphs and charts to display information about human and physical features in the United States.

          (5) Identify the purpose and content of various maps of the United States.

          (6) Derive geographic information from photographs, maps, graphs, books and technological resources.

     (b) Understand the physical and human features of places, and use that information to define and study regions and their patterns of changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Provide examples of the interactions between humans and the environment in the United States.

          (2) Identify regions in the United States in which historical events occurred, including, without limitation, the 13 colonies, the Underground Railroad and the California gold fields.

          (3) Provide examples of cultural identity in communities or regions from different perspectives.

          (4) Demonstrate how regional change in the United States from one decade to the next decade has affected the characteristics of a place, including, without limitation, the use of salt and sand to melt ice, flood basins and levees.

          (5) Label a map of the United States by identifying each state and the capital of each state.

          (6) Define the term “absolute location.”

     (c) Understand how economic, political and cultural processes interact to shape patterns of human migration and settlement, influence and interdependence, and conflict and cooperation, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain differences in the distribution of population in the United States.

          (2) List the “push-pull” factors that influence human migration and settlement in the United States.

          (3)  Describe the differences among rural, suburban and urban settlements in the United States.

          (4) Describe historical and current economic issues in the United States using geographic resources, including, without limitation, illustrating demographic changes as a result of mining and gaming.

          (5) Describe why the types of organizations are different based upon geographic regions in the United States.

     (d) Understand the effects of interactions between human and physical systems, and changes in the use, distribution and importance of resources, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe ways physical environments affect activity of persons in the United States using historical and contemporary examples.

          (2) Describe how technologies altered the physical environment in the United States and the effect those changes had on the residents of the United States.

          (3) Explore the impact of human modifications to the physical environment of the United States on the residents of the United States.

          (4) Identify and locate potential natural hazards in the United States and the impact those hazards have on the land and population.

          (5) Describe and compare the patterns of distribution of natural resources and the use of those resources in the United States.

     4.  For the area of economics:

     (a) Understand how scarcity and incentives affect choices, how markets work, why markets form, how supply and demand interact to determine the market price and how changes in prices act as economic signals to coordinate trade, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe how scarcity requires a person to make a choice and identify the costs associated with that choice.

          (2) Demonstrate an understanding that a person can be a consumer and producer at the same time.

          (3) Identify the resources that are needed for production in households, schools and community groups.

          (4) Describe how income reflects the choices persons make about education, training, development of skills, lifestyles and careers.

          (5) Demonstrate an understanding of supply and demand in a market.

     (b) Identify indicators used to measure economic performance, understand important aspects of how the economy acts as a system, and understand the roles of money, interest rates, saving and borrowing, financial institutions and the central banking system in the economy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Define the terms “trade” and “commodity.”

          (2) Identify how interest rates affect borrowing, saving and purchasing of goods or services using credit.

          (3) Identify services offered by different types of financial institutions.

          (4) Illustrate how a person’s spending becomes another person’s income.

          (5) Recognize the three types of productive resources.

          (6) Define the terms “inflation” and “deflation.”

          (7) Define the terms “labor force” and “unemployment.”

          (8) Demonstrate per capita measures in the classroom.

     (c) Identify the causes of economic change and explain how the economic system of the United States responds to those changes and how other economic systems respond to change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain the purposes for establishing for-profit and not-for-profit organizations.

          (2) Provide an example of how purchasing a tool or acquiring an education can increase the ability to produce goods.

          (3) Describe the steps an entrepreneur would take to start a business.

          (4) Explain why specialization increases productivity and interdependence.

          (5) Describe what it means to compete and give examples of ways sellers compete.

          (6) Define the term “mercantilism.”

          (7) Identify resources that are scarce and identify how those resources are allocated in the United States.

     (d) Explore trends in international trade, the impact of trade on the economy of the United States and the role of exchange rates, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain why the United States exports and imports goods.

          (2) Define the term “exchange rate.”

          (3) Define the term “globalization” and explain how the United States economy is affected by international trade.

     5.  For the area of civics:

     (a) Know why society needs rules, law and governments, and understand the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain that the United States Constitution, the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights are written documents that are the foundation of the government of the United States.

          (2) Describe the operation of a representative government.

          (3) Describe the criteria for United States citizenship.

          (4) Explain the symbolic importance of the Pledge of Allegiance and the Fourth of July.

     (b) Understand the United States Constitution and the government created by the United States Constitution, including, without limitation, the relationship between national and sub-national governments, and the structure and function of state and local governments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe examples of national, state and local laws.

          (2) Identify the three branches of the Federal Government.

          (3) Name the two houses of the Congress of the United States and explain how representation in those houses is determined.

          (4) Identify powers of the Congress of the United States, including, without limitation, the power to tax, the power to declare war and the power to impeach the President of the United States.

          (5) Identify the duties of the President of the United States within the Executive Branch.

          (6) Explain that the United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the country.

          (7) Describe the purpose of a judge and a jury in a trial as they relate to resolving disputes.

     (c) Describe the roles of political parties, elections, interest groups, the media and public opinion in the democratic process, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain the qualities of leadership.

          (2) Name the two major political parties.

          (3) Give examples of national interest groups.

          (4) Compare sources of information which persons use to form opinions.

          (5) Define the term “propaganda” and give examples.

     (d) Explain the different political systems in the world and how those systems relate to the United States and the citizens of the United States, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to describe the influence of other nations on the development of the political system of the United States.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R074-00, eff. 6-20-2000; A by R011-09, 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.29425  Fifth grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the fifth grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for the fifth grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the fifth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for English language arts offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the fifth grade in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of the fifth grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.29435  Fifth grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the fifth grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for mathematics for the fifth grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the fifth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2013-2014 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the fifth grade in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of the fifth grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012; A by R019-11, 5-30-2012, eff. 7-1-2013)

     NAC 389.2946  Third through fifth grades: Physical education. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the fifth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for courses in physical education offered in public schools. Instruction in third grade, fourth grade and fifth grade in physical education must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the fifth grade:

     1.  Demonstrate competency in motor skills, patterns of movement and safety practices needed to perform a variety of physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use locomotor and nonlocomotor movements in physical activities;

     (b) Perform simple combinations of manipulative skills;

     (c) Perform simple and moderately difficult motor skills and patterns of movement; and

     (d) Demonstrate safe practices while participating in physical activities.

     2.  Apply concepts, principles and strategies relating to movement, performance and safety while participating in physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Recognize the critical elements of forms of movement;

     (b) Explain how game strategies are used in physical activities; and

     (c) Explain the importance of rules and procedures relating to safety with regard to oneself and other persons while participating in physical activities.

     3.  Participate regularly in physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Participate in a variety of moderate to vigorous physical activities;

     (b) Apply healthy patterns of activity by participating regularly in physical activity; and

     (c) Identify opportunities at school for participation in physical activities on a regular basis.

     4.  Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Participate in various physical activities using the health-related components of fitness in those physical activities; and

     (b) Explain the long-term health and fitness benefits of participating in physical activities.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R033-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R062-13, 2-26-2014)

     NAC 389.2948  Fifth grade: Technology and computers. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the fifth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for technology and computers offered in public schools. Instruction in the fifth grade in technology and computers must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the fifth grade:

     1.  For the areas of creativity and innovation, demonstrate creative thinking, build knowledge and develop innovative products and processes using technology, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Process new ideas that are based on prior knowledge to brainstorm solutions to a problem that arises in an everyday situation using digital tools;

     (b) With limited assistance from the teacher, create an original work in a digital format to demonstrate personal or group expression;

     (c) Use digital models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues; and

     (d) Identify and represent trends to make predictions using data from the classroom.

     2.  For the areas of communication and collaboration, use digital media and environments to communicate and work in collaboration with other pupils, including pupils outside of the classroom, to support the learning of the pupil and the learning of other pupils, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Collaborate with other pupils to create and publish a digital product and make the product available outside the classroom;

     (b) Communicate information and ideas using digital text, images and sound;

     (c) Describe the appropriate media and format for a specific audience;

     (d) Use digital resources to research places, persons and different cultures from around the world;

     (e) Contribute to a group to produce an original work in a digital format; and

     (f) Describe the different ways to interact with other persons and contribute to a digital product.

     3.  For the area of fluency of research and information, gather, evaluate and use information, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) For a research project, use digital tools to plan a timeline and track the progress of the project;

     (b) Use keywords to search, organize, locate and synthesize information in multiple sources to create an original product;

     (c) Explain the importance of using more than one source and recognize the possible biases in digital resources;

     (d) Discern the differences between fact and opinion in digital content;

     (e) Choose and use a digital tool that is appropriate for a task; and

     (f) Collect, organize, analyze and manipulate data using digital tools and report the results in a format that is appropriate to the task.

     4.  For the areas of critical thinking, problem solving and decision making, use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems and make informed decisions using the digital tools and resources that are appropriate for the specific task, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Develop questions that will guide the pupil in the investigation of a problem that arises in an everyday situation using digital resources;

     (b) Plan and manage projects using a digital planning tool;

     (c) Propose a solution to a problem that arises in an everyday situation using digital tools and data that has been collected; and

     (d) Explore alternative solutions to and diverse perspectives on problems that arise in everyday situations and propose a solution to those problems using digital tools.

     5.  For the area of the appropriate use of technology, understand human, cultural and societal issues relating to technology and practice legal and ethical behaviors when using technology, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Describe the code of conduct for the use of technology at the school in which the pupil is enrolled and the consequences of violating that code of conduct;

     (b) Describe unacceptable and unsafe behaviors when using technology, including, without limitation, cyber-bullying, divulging personal information and plagiarism;

     (c) Use technological resources for solving problems, directing personal learning, collaborating and extending learning activities;

     (d) Describe why a pupil needs lifelong learning in a world that is global and dynamic; and

     (e) Explain the concepts of using technology in an appropriate manner, accessing technology in an appropriate manner and technological literacy, and explain the personal and societal responsibilities associated with those concepts.

     6.  For the areas of technological operations and concepts, demonstrate an understanding of technological concepts, systems and operations, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Give examples of technological systems;

     (b) Demonstrate appropriate keyboarding skills;

     (c) Choose the appropriate digital tools for a specific learning activity;

     (d) Analyze and apply specific strategies for solving common hardware and software problems; and

     (e) Generalize routine procedures for a variety of technologies.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R038-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R008-10, 6-30-2010)

     NAC 389.2949  Fifth grade: The arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the fifth grade, each pupil must know and be able to do everything required in previous grades for courses in the arts offered in public elementary schools. Instruction in the arts in the fifth grade must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards of performance by the completion of the fifth grade:

     1.  For the area of music:

     (a) Sing a varied repertoire of music alone and with others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Sing folk songs, patriotic songs and multicultural songs demonstrating correct pitch, mood and tempo while using the head voice;

          (2) Respond to cues from a conductor;

          (3) Consistently sing complex ostinatos on pitch; and

          (4) Maintain his or her own parts while singing descants, partner songs and three-part rounds in a large ensemble.

     (b) Perform a varied repertoire of music on instruments alone and with others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Play a melodic, rhythmic and chordal pattern on instruments in the classroom using the proper technique;

          (2) Echo an eight-beat rhythmic and melodic pattern; and

          (3) Play or accompany folk, traditional and multicultural music using accurate rhythm and melodic patterns.

     (c) Improvise melodies, variations and accompaniments as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to improvise:

          (1) Two rhythmic and melodic phrases while maintaining a steady beat; and

          (2) By playing, speaking or singing a specific section of music, such as introductions and codas.

     (d) Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Organize sounds into musical representations of characters, places, objects, actions, events or feelings to accompany readings and dramatizations in a large group; and

          (2) With assistance from the teacher, create and perform songs and instrumental pieces in a specific form using a variety of sound sources.

     (e) Read and notate music as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate knowledge of whole, half, dotted half, quarter and eighth notes and rests through speaking and body percussion;

          (2) Read melodic patterns in the treble clef with solfege, letters or numbers;

          (3) Define and use musical symbols such as dynamics and tempo;

          (4) Sight-read a rhythmic and pentatonic pattern;

          (5) Notate an eight-beat rhythmic pattern in standard notation; and

          (6) Notate an eight-beat melodic pattern in standard notation.

     (f) Listen to, analyze and describe music as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify groups of repeated rhythmic and melodic patterns in a listening selection and recognize simple form;

          (2) Describe musical examples using appropriate musical terminology such as tempo, dynamics and mood; and

          (3) Identify families of instruments.

     (g) Evaluate music and musical performances as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Construct criteria for evaluating musical performances and compositions; and

          (2) Evaluate performances and compositions using standard musical vocabulary.

     (h) Demonstrate knowledge of the historical periods and cultural diversity of music, including, without limitation, the ability to:

          (1) Connect music with various historical periods and various cultures of the world; and

          (2) Identify roles of musicians and offer an example of each.

     2.  For the area of theater:

     (a) Understand the components of a theatrical production, including, without limitation, scriptwriting, directing and production as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Write or improvise a script with two or more characters which has a beginning, middle and end and which has a setting and character descriptions;

          (2) Plan, rehearse and present a dramatized idea or story in a cooperative setting;

          (3) Draw or build a simple model set utilizing basic craft materials; and

          (4) Use materials in the classroom or home to create props and costumes to suggest a specific time and locale in a dramatized event.

     (b) Understand and demonstrate the role of the actor in the theater as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the traits of characters by examining their specific actions and what they say;

          (2) Demonstrate character through movement, pantomime, improvisation or voice; and

          (3) Portray the traits of a character through appropriate movement, voice and language in a dramatized idea or story.

     (c) Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in theater, film, television and electronic media as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discuss what the pupil sees and hears in a performance;

          (2) Explain how a performance made him or her feel and state his or her preference for a particular genre; and

          (3) Explain two differences between comedy and tragedy, giving examples.

     (d) Recognize and explain how theatrical experiences contribute to a better understanding of history, culture and human relationships as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Cite two examples from movies or television that give historical and cultural information; and

          (2) Identify the conflict between characters in a dramatized event.

     3.  For the area of visual arts:

     (a) Know and apply media, techniques and processes for developing visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Cite one example that demonstrates the different uses of media, techniques and processes in works of art;

          (2) Describe how the response of the audience changes because of different media, techniques and processes; and

          (3) Identify and demonstrate the appropriate use of various media, techniques and processes to communicate ideas.

     (b) Use knowledge of characteristics, purposes and functions of the visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe selected visual characteristics of visual art;

          (2) Explain purposes and functions of selected works of visual art;

          (3) Explain how visual characteristics, purposes and functions of selected works of visual art cause different responses from the audience; and

          (4) Choose visual characteristics to create a work that communicates an intended purpose to the audience.

     (c) Choose, apply and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain what a work of visual art is about by identifying subject matter, symbols and ideas;

          (2) Create a work of visual art that integrates subject matter and symbols with ideas to convey meaning to the audience; and

          (3) Explain how and why subject matter, symbols and ideas are chosen to present meaning in the pupil’s work.

     (d) Understand the visual arts in relation to history and culture as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Place accurately a variety of works of visual art in historical or cultural contexts; and

          (2) Create works of visual art that show the influence of a particular time and place.

     (e) Analyze and assess characteristics, merits and meaning in the pupil’s own works of visual art and the works of others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare and contrast two works of visual art based on the observations of the pupil;

          (2) Identify merits in various works of visual art;

          (3) Present various interpretations of a work of visual art; and

          (4) Identify preferred characteristics or meanings in works of visual art.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

Instruction: Sixth Through Eighth Grades

     NAC 389.2985  Sixth grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the sixth grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for the sixth grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the sixth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for English language arts offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the sixth grade in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of the sixth grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.299  Sixth grade: Information literacy. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the 6th grade, and continuing through the 12th grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades to be information literate. Instruction in the 6th grade, regardless of whether it takes place in the library or the classroom, must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards for information literacy by the completion of the 6th grade and continuing through the completion of the 12th grade:

     1.  For the areas of understanding the process of obtaining information in such a manner as to access information efficiently and effectively, evaluate information critically and competently, and use information accurately and creatively, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Recognize the need for information by:

          (1) Giving examples of situations in which additional information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question;

          (2) Determining whether additional information beyond the pupil’s own knowledge is needed to resolve an information problem or question; and

          (3) Assessing whether a range of information problems or questions can be resolved based on the pupil’s own knowledge or whether additional information is required.

     (b) Recognize that accurate and comprehensive information is the basis for intelligent decision making by:

          (1) Selecting examples of accurate and inaccurate information and of complete and incomplete information;

          (2) Explaining the difference between accurate and inaccurate information and between complete and incomplete information; and

          (3) Judging the quality of decisions in terms of the accuracy and completeness of the information on which they are based.

     (c) Formulate questions by:

          (1) Stating at least one broad question that will help in finding the needed information;

          (2) Stating both broad and specific questions that will help in finding the needed information; and

          (3) Revising, adding and deleting questions as the needs for information change.

     (d) Identify a variety of potential sources of information by:

          (1) Listing several sources of information and explaining the kind of information found in each source;

          (2) Brainstorming a range of sources of information that will meet a need for information; and

          (3) Using a full range of information sources to meet different needs for information.

     (e) Develop and use successful strategies for locating information by:

          (1) Listing some ideas for identifying and finding information that is needed;

          (2) Explaining and applying a plan to access information that is needed; and

          (3) Formulating and revising plans for accessing information for a range of needs and situations.

     (f) Determine accuracy, relevance and comprehensiveness by:

          (1) Defining the terms “accuracy,” “relevance” and “comprehensiveness” and giving examples of their application;

          (2) Comparing and contrasting sources related to a topic; and

          (3) Judging the accuracy, relevance and comprehensiveness of sources of information in relation to a range of topics and information problems.

     (g) Distinguish among fact, point of view and opinion by:

          (1) Recognizing those concepts in various sources and products of information;

          (2) Explaining how each concept is different from the others; and

          (3) Assembling them, as appropriate, in the pupil’s own work.

     (h) Identify inaccurate and misleading information by:

          (1) Recognizing inaccurate and misleading information in sources and products of information;

          (2) Explaining how such information can lead to faulty conclusions; and

          (3) Judging, and supporting judgments of, the degree of inaccuracy, bias or misleading information in sources and products of information.

     (i) Select information appropriate to a specific problem or question by:

          (1) Recognizing information that is applicable to that problem or question;

          (2) Analyzing information from a variety of sources to determine its applicability to that problem or question; and

          (3) Integrating accurate, relevant and comprehensive information to resolve that problem or question.

     (j) Organize information for practical application by:

          (1) Describing several ways to organize information, including chronologically, topically and hierarchically;

          (2) Organizing the information in different ways according to the specific information problem or question; and

          (3) Organizing a product of information that presents different types of information in the most effective ways.

     (k) Integrate new information into the pupil’s existing knowledge by:

          (1) Recognizing and understanding new information and ideas;

          (2) Combining what is already known about a topic with new information and drawing conclusions using the combined information; and

          (3) Integrating the pupil’s existing knowledge with information from a variety of sources to create new meaning.

     (l) Apply information in critical thinking and problem solving by:

          (1) Identifying information that meets a particular need for information;

          (2) Using information from a variety of sources to resolve an information problem or question; and

          (3) Devising creative approaches to use information to resolve information problems or questions.

     (m) Produce and communicate information and ideas in appropriate formats by:

          (1) Naming a variety of different formats for presenting different kinds of information;

          (2) Choosing an appropriate format for presenting information based on the information itself, the audience, and the nature of the information problem or question; and

          (3) Choosing the most appropriate format for presenting information and justifying that choice.

     2.  For the areas of pursuing information related to personal interests, appreciating literature and other creative expressions of information, and striving for excellence in seeking information and generating knowledge, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information relating to various dimensions of personal well-being, such as vocational interests, involvement in community, matters concerning health and recreational pursuits by:

          (1) Occasionally seeking information about topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being;

          (2) Generally expanding beyond the pupil’s own knowledge to seek information concerning topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being; and

          (3) Exploring a range of sources to obtain information concerning topics of personal interest or aspects of well-being.

     (b) Design, develop and evaluate information and conclusions based upon that information relating to topics of personal interest to the pupil by:

          (1) Organizing and presenting basic information gathered by the pupil relating to those topics of personal interest;

          (2) Creating solutions and methods of conveying information concerning those topics of personal interest; and

          (3) Judging the quality of the pupil’s own solutions and methods of conveying information concerning those topics of personal interest.

     (c) Function as a competent and self-motivated reader by:

          (1) Explaining and discussing various examples of fiction;

          (2) Choosing fiction and other types of literature to read and analyze; and

          (3) Reading avidly and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of literature read.

     (d) Derive meaning from information presented creatively in a variety of formats by explaining and discussing films, plays and other creative presentations of information.

     (e) Develop creative methods of conveying information in a variety of formats by:

          (1) Expressing information and ideas creatively in simple formats; and

          (2) Expressing information and ideas creatively in ways that combine several formats.

     (f) Assess the quality of the process and outcome of the pupil’s efforts to obtain information by:

          (1) Retracing the steps the pupil took to obtain information and explaining which were most useful for resolving a problem or question concerning the information;

          (2) Assessing each step the pupil took to obtain information with respect to a specific problem concerning the information and assessing the result; and

          (3) Evaluating the process of obtaining information at each step as it occurs and making such adjustments as are necessary to improve both the process and the outcome.

     (g) Devise basic strategies for revising, improving and updating self-generated knowledge by:

          (1) Explaining those strategies;

          (2) Selecting and applying such strategies as are appropriate; and

          (3) Recognizing gaps in the pupil’s own knowledge and applying appropriate strategies for filling those gaps.

     3.  For the areas of recognizing the importance of information to a democratic society, practicing ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology, and participating effectively in groups to pursue and generate information, a pupil must demonstrate the ability to:

     (a) Seek information from diverse sources, contexts, disciplines and cultures by:

          (1) Identifying several appropriate sources for resolving an information problem or question;

          (2) Using a variety of sources covering diverse perspectives to resolve an information problem or question; and

          (3) Seeking sources representing a variety of contexts, disciplines and cultures and evaluating their usefulness for resolving an information problem or question.

     (b) Respect the principle of equitable access to information by:

          (1) Explaining why it is important for all pupils to have access to information, information sources and information technology;

          (2) Using information, information sources and information technology efficiently so that they are available for other pupils to use; and

          (3) Proposing strategies for ensuring that pupils and others have equitable access to information, information sources and information technology.

     (c) Respect the principles of intellectual freedom by:

          (1) Defining or giving examples of “intellectual freedom”;

          (2) Analyzing a situation in terms of its relationship to intellectual freedom, including, without limitation, issuing a personal opinion of a book or video in the library media center; and

          (3) Predicting what might happen if the principles of intellectual freedom were ignored in the pupil’s own community.

     (d) Respect intellectual property rights by:

          (1) Giving examples of what it means to respect intellectual property rights;

          (2) Analyzing situations to determine the steps necessary to respect intellectual property rights, including, without limitation, the creation of a term paper or the development of a multimedia product; and

          (3) Avoiding plagiarism, citing sources properly and making copies and incorporating text and images only with appropriate approval when creating products of information.

     (e) Use information technology responsibly by:

          (1) Stating the main points of the policy of the pupil’s school regarding the use of computing and communications hardware, software and networks;

          (2) Locating appropriate information efficiently with the school’s computing and communications hardware, software and networks; and

          (3) Following all guidelines and policies of the school relating to the use of computing and communications hardware, software and networks when resolving information problems or questions.

     (f) Share and contribute knowledge and information with other pupils in groups by:

          (1) Seeking and communicating specific facts, opinions and points of view related to information problems or questions;

          (2) Using information sources and selecting information and ideas that will contribute directly to the success of group projects; and

          (3) Integrating the pupil’s own knowledge and information with that of other pupils in the group.

     (g) Respect the ideas and backgrounds of other pupils and acknowledge their contributions by:

          (1) Describing the ideas of other pupils accurately and completely;

          (2) Encouraging consideration of ideas and information from all group members; and

          (3) Helping to organize and integrate the contributions of all the members of the group into products of information.

     (h) Collaborate with others, both in person and through technologies, to identify information problems and to seek a solution by:

          (1) Expressing the pupil’s own ideas appropriately and effectively, in person and remotely through technologies, while working in groups to identify and resolve information problems;

          (2) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to analyze information problems and suggest solutions; and

          (3) Participating actively in discussions with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to devise solutions that integrate the information and ideas of group members.

     (i) Collaborate with others, both in person and through technologies, to design, develop and evaluate products and solutions of information by:

          (1) Working with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to create and evaluate simple products of information;

          (2) Working with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to create and evaluate products of information that communicate complex information and ideas; and

          (3) Working with others, in person and remotely through technologies, to create and evaluate complex products of information that integrate information in a variety of formats.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R071-01, eff. 11-1-2001; A by R013-03, 10-30-2003)

     NAC 389.302  Sixth grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the sixth grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards in mathematics for the sixth grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the sixth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2013-2014 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the sixth grade in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of the sixth grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012; A by R019-11, 5-30-2012, eff. 7-1-2013)

     NAC 389.322  Seventh grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the seventh grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for the seventh grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the seventh grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for English language arts offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the seventh grade in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of the seventh grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.324  Seventh grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the seventh grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards in mathematics for the seventh grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the seventh grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2013-2014 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the seventh grade in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of the seventh grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012; A by R019-11, 5-30-2012, eff. 7-1-2013)

     NAC 389.372  Sixth through eighth grades: Social studies. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the sixth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for social studies offered in public schools. Instruction in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades in social studies must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the eighth grade:

     1.  For the area of social study skills:

     (a) Acquire and apply skills of reading, writing and oral communication to construct knowledge, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Read text using reading strategies, including, without limitation, strategies that employ prior knowledge, use key vocabulary words and employ context clues.

          (2) Read text to identify cause and effect relationships, compare and contrast information, identify fact and opinion and identify author bias.

          (3) Apply reading and writing strategies to construct and express knowledge.

          (4) Use reading and writing to respond to historical literature.

          (5) Gather information by taking notes, making outlines and creating graphic organizers.

          (6) Formulate essential questions on a prescribed topic.

     (b) Acquire, organize, use and evaluate information that prepares a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Formulate appropriate research questions.

          (2) Conduct research by locating, gathering, organizing and evaluating information and data from online and print resources and evaluating those resources.

          (3) Effectively communicate and present information orally, in writing and by developing multimedia presentations and using other forms of technology.

          (4) Identify propaganda, censorship and bias in the media.

          (5) Explain information through the use of maps, graphs, charts and diagrams.

          (6) Use technological resources for problem solving, self-directed learning and extended learning activities.

          (7) Demonstrate acceptable social and ethical behaviors when using technology and discuss the consequences of the inappropriate use of technology.

          (8) Use technological tools that are specific for the purpose of supporting learning and research.

          (9) Evaluate the accuracy, relevancy, appropriateness and bias of online and print resources.

     (c) Demonstrate historical comprehension by analyzing and interpreting historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts and interpretations or perspectives on past events, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop a sense of historical time to identify the sequence in which events occurred, including, without limitation, a sense of the past, present and future.

          (2) Identify primary and secondary resources which contain historical content.

          (3) Identify historical myths and historical facts.

          (4) Apply social studies to situations involving actual events that are currently taking place.

          (5) Formulate questions pertaining to history.

          (6) Interpret history through the use of primary and secondary resources.

          (7) Identify multiple perspectives of historical events.

          (8) Answer a question pertaining to history through the interpretation of primary resources.

     (d) Demonstrate skills which prepare a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Accept responsibility for the well-being of himself or herself, his or her family and the community in which he or she lives.

          (2) Identify issues and events that have an impact on persons at local, state, national and global levels.

          (3) Actively participate in civics and community life at the local, state, national and global level.

          (4) Ask meaningful questions to evaluate information.

          (5) Use effective decision-making and problem-solving skills in public and private life.

          (6) Collaborate effectively as a member of a group.

     2.  For the area of history:

     (a) Understand the development, characteristics and interaction of persons, cultures, societies, religions and ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the cultural contributions of Native Americans in Nevada and in the United States.

          (2) Investigate ways in which Native Americans and immigrants helped create North American culture.

          (3) Describe the interaction among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans.

          (4) Compare lifestyles in the New England, Middle and Southern colonies as determined by race, class and gender.

          (5) Identify American industrialists and discuss their contributions to the social, economic and political way of life.

          (6) Explain how literature, music, architecture and visual arts reflect time periods.

          (7) Explore the attraction of the American West and the reality of life on the frontier as it relates to communication, farming, issues regarding water, mining and ranching.

          (8) Describe the contributions of immigrant groups to the emerging American culture.

          (9) Discuss the characteristics of American culture.

          (10) Describe the role of farming, railroads and mining in the settlement of the American West.

          (11) Explain the effects of World War I and World War II on social and cultural life in Nevada and in the United States.

          (12) Identify and describe the characteristics of preagricultural societies.

          (13) Identify and describe the technological innovations of early agrarian societies.

          (14) Identify the characteristics of pre-Columbian civilizations in South America that became part of the American culture.

          (15) Evaluate factors that contributed to the fall of the pre-Columbian civilizations.

          (16) Identify the characteristics of a civilization.

          (17) Explain how the geographic location of a civilization influences the development of the civilization.

          (18) Describe the achievements of ancient and classical civilizations.

          (19) Locate ancient, classical and regional civilizations and describe their contributions to social structures, religions and political systems.

          (20) Describe the origins, traditions, customs and spread of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism.

          (21) Describe the cultural achievements of societies in the Middle East, the Far East, the Americas, Africa, South Asia and Europe.

          (22) Identify contributions of persons from around the world during the Middle Ages.

          (23) Explain the impact of the Crusades, trade and the bubonic plague on societies during the Middle Ages.

     (b) Understand the influences of persons, events, ideas and conflicts in the development of nations, empires, cultures and political and economic ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Summarize the contributions of the diverse populations of the early settlers of Nevada.

          (2) Explain the events that led to Nevada attaining statehood.

          (3) Describe how compromise and conflict among persons contributed to political, economic and cultural divisions.

          (4) Identify and explain the importance of immigrant and native groups to mining, ranching, railroads and commerce in Nevada and in the United States.

          (5) Describe the impact of the United States military and atomic testing on Nevada.

          (6) Describe the effects of tourism and gaming on Nevada.

          (7) Describe the goals and accomplishments of labor unions in Nevada.

          (8) Determine the significance of the First Continental Congress and Second Continental Congress and committees of correspondence.

          (9) Describe the events, course and results of the American Revolution, including, without limitation, the contributions of women, African Americans and Native Americans.

          (10) Explain how the failures of the Articles of Confederation led to the creation of the United States Constitution.

          (11) Explain the issues involved in the creation and ratification of the United States Constitution and the government established by the United States Constitution.

          (12) Identify the rights of persons and rights of states that are protected by the Bill of Rights and the continued significance of those rights.

          (13) Evaluate the influences of persons in the development of a national identity, including, without limitation, Chief Pontiac, George Washington and Abigail Adams.

          (14) Describe the factors that contributed to the development of national identity following the War of 1812.

          (15) Describe the patterns of colonization, immigration and settlement in the United States, including, without limitation, the role of economic incentives, the effects of geography and politics, and the role of transportation systems.

          (16) Define the concept of Manifest Destiny and explain the events that led to the expansion of the United States.

          (17) Discuss and analyze the interactions between the pioneers and Native Americans during the expansion of the American West.

          (18) Describe the institutionalization of slavery in America, the resistance of persons who were enslaved and the ongoing struggle between proponents and opponents of slavery.

          (19) Identify and describe the causes, important persons and events of the Civil War.

          (20) Identify and discuss the immediate outcomes and long-term effects of the Civil War.

          (21) Summarize the successes and failures of the Reconstruction.

          (22) Describe the effects of industrialization and new technologies on the development of the United States.

          (23) Explain the causes of the Great Depression and the impact of the Great Depression on society and the political policies of the United States.

          (24) Identify the characteristics that led to the emergence and decline of empires around the world.

          (25) Identify the characteristics of various political systems of ancient civilizations.

          (26) Explain how feudal relationships provided a foundation for political order in Europe and Japan.

          (27) Determine the causes and consequences of political revolutions.

          (28) Define the term “nation-state” and explain the political development of nation-states.

          (29) Define the term “mercantilism” and explain how mercantilism influenced patterns of economic activity.

          (30) Explore how a desire for foreign goods led to an increase in economic and cultural diversity.

     (c) Understand the influences of social ideas and personal action on social, political, economic and technological change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the similarities and differences of the political, religious, linguistic, economic and social customs among the European colonial communities in North America.

          (2) Explain the political and economic causes and effects of the American Revolution.

          (3) Describe the important political ideas that influenced the American Revolution and the formation of the United States.

          (4) Explain the major ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

          (5) Describe the social reform and religious movements of antebellum America.

          (6) Define the term “abolition” and identify important persons and events of the Abolitionist Movement.

          (7) Explain the struggle between the rights of states and the idea of federalism and the impact of those struggles on the national identity of the United States.

          (8) Explore the causes, events, major inventions and technologies of the Industrial Revolution and explain their impact on the way of life in Nevada and the United States.

          (9) Identify the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the United States Constitution and explain their impact on the expansion of human rights.

          (10) Identify the Black Codes and Jim Crow Laws and explain how they reflected attitudes about race.

          (11) Discuss the rise of the Populist and Progressive Movements and explain how they reflected social change.

          (12) Explain the major social, technological and cultural developments of the 1920s.

          (13) Explain how democratic principles introduced by the Greeks and Romans developed the concept of social responsibility.

          (14) Analyze the social impact of technology, including, without limitation, the introduction of ships, iron, a water delivery system, the wheel and the printing press.

          (15) Explain the spread of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism and the impact of those religions on society.

          (16) Identify institutions of social responsibility, including, without limitation, churches, governments and families, and explain the impact of those institutions on society.

          (17) Compare the economic and social importance of slavery with other forms of coerced labor from ancient times to the present.

          (18) Explain how civilizations create order through social groupings, including, without limitation, caste systems, class systems and feudalism.

     (d) Understand the interactions and interdependence among nations from around the world and the impact of economics, politics, religions and cultures on international relationships, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe major local, national and world issues and explain the impact of those issues on international relations.

          (2) Describe the causes and effects of the French and Indian War on the political policies of the United States and the expansion of the territory of the United States.

          (3) Describe the influence of the American Revolution on Europe and the Americas.

          (4) Describe the contributions of foreign persons and nations to the outcome of the American Revolution.

          (5) Examine the involvement of the United States in World War I.

          (6) Examine the political and economic effects of World War I on the United States.

          (7) Identify the causes of World War II and the reasons for the United States entering the war.

          (8) Discuss the effects of World War II on the economic and political policies of the United States.

          (9) Identify the motivations for groups coming to the United States and discuss the political policies of the United States regarding immigration.

          (10) Examine how the Crusades led to a diffusion of ideas throughout Europe and Asia.

          (11) Examine how decisions made in the settlement of the American West affected modern foreign commerce, including, without limitation, energy, mining and multinational corporations.

          (12) Explain the significance of major events in Nevada, in the United States and throughout the world that are reported by the media.

     3.  For the area of geography:

     (a) Use maps, globes and other geographic tools and technologies to locate and extrapolate information about persons, places and environments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use map elements, including, without limitation, scale, to locate physical and human features in the United States and in the world.

          (2) Compare the characteristics and purposes of several types of maps, map projections and other geographic representations.

          (3) Make and defend a spatial decision applying basic geographic vocabulary, tools and concepts.

          (4) Construct a mental map from memory.

          (5) Create maps about human and physical features around the world and compare those maps for purpose, accuracy, content, form and design.

          (6) Provide oral directions to move from one location to another.

          (7) Compare the physical and human features of Earth using maps, fieldwork, graphic representations, aerial photographs, satellite images and technological resources.

     (b) Understand the physical and human features of places, and use that information to define and study regions and their patterns of changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe physical and human features, including, without limitation, the cultural characteristics of places and regions in Nevada, the United States and the world.

          (2) Locate major civilizations from ancient times to current times and describe how and why those civilizations changed over time.

          (3) Illustrate the relationship between the physical and cultural characteristics of a region.

          (4) Evaluate the role regions have played in historical events.

          (5) Define geographic terms, including, without limitation, “archipelago,” “gulf,” “basin” and “tundra.”

          (6) Describe the relationships between regions and belief systems and state how these relationships are important to cultural identity.

          (7) Compare how cultural characteristics affect different points of view of places and regions.

          (8) Compare the uses of technology across cultures in the world.

          (9) Use absolute and relative location, including, without limitation, longitude and latitude, to locate prominent countries, cities and physical features in different regions of the world.

     (c) Understand how economic, political and cultural processes interact to shape patterns of human migration and settlement, influence and interdependence, and conflict and cooperation, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the characteristics of developed and developing countries using demographic concepts.

          (2) Describe how movements of persons, goods, ideas and resources have affected events and conditions in the past and present.

          (3) Identify the conditions necessary for the development of civilizations and the cultural, political and economic characteristics resulting from the growth of civilizations.

          (4) Identify patterns of rural and urban settlements in developed and developing countries.

          (5) Identify a regional or international economic issue and explain that issue from a spatial perspective.

          (6) Explain how the physical and human geography of a region influences the allocation of resources in that region.

          (7) Compare cultural, political and economic organizations in the United States.

     (d) Understand the effects of interactions between human and physical systems, and changes in the use, distribution and importance of resources, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe and predict the regional or global impact of changes in the physical environment.

          (2) Evaluate the role of technology in the human modification of the physical environment.

          (3) Describe the changes caused by human modification of the physical environment.

          (4) Discuss the impact of natural hazards on the use and distribution of resources.

          (5) Research a specific natural hazard and document its effect on human systems.

          (6) Define renewable resources, nonrenewable resources and artificially created resources.

          (7) Categorize and locate examples of renewable resources, nonrenewable resources and artificially created resources.

          (8) Evaluate different viewpoints regarding a resource.

     4.  For the area of economics:

     (a) Understand how scarcity and incentives affect choices, how markets work, why markets form, how supply and demand interact to determine the market price and how changes in prices act as economic signals to coordinate trade, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discuss choices persons make, including, without limitation, the concepts of opportunity cost and total benefit of making a choice.

          (2) Identify factors, including, without limitation, price, income, availability of substitutes and self-interest, that affect purchasing decisions.

          (3) Identify factors, including, without limitation, output prices, input prices and technology, that affect the decision of a producer to supply goods.

          (4) Discuss career paths, taking into consideration the specific skills required for a career, the wages that may be earned in a career and the impact of the skills of a person on the wages he or she can earn.

          (5) Demonstrate and explain an understanding of supply and demand in a market, including, without limitation, the law of supply and demand.

     (b) Identify indicators used to measure economic performance, understand important aspects of how the economy acts as a system, and understand the roles of money, interest rates, saving and borrowing, financial institutions and the central banking system in the economy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the transition from the use of commodities as money to the use of modern forms of money.

          (2) Illustrate how prices that are stated in terms of money help persons compare the values of products.

          (3) Explain why loans that are considered a high risk to the lender have a higher interest rate than loans that are considered safe.

          (4) Identify the advantages and disadvantages of using cash and the advantages and disadvantages of using a credit card.

          (5) Compare the rewards and risks of saving money in a financial institution.

          (6) Explain the circular flow of economic activity.

          (7) Explain how the current use of a productive resource affects the availability of that resource in the future.

          (8) Explain how inflation affects persons as they use their incomes to buy goods and services.

          (9) Identify factors that can affect the likelihood that a person will be unemployed and give examples of the costs of unemployment to the economy as a whole.

          (10) Determine the per capita gross domestic product using data on population and determine the gross domestic product for several countries and compare those gross domestic products with the gross domestic product of the United States.

          (11) Explain gross domestic product and how it is used to describe the economic output of a country.

          (12) Compare the buying power of the United States dollar in one year with the buying power of the United States dollar in another year by using the consumer price index.

          (13) Distinguish between a high rate of unemployment for the United States economy and a low rate of unemployment for the United States economy over a period of time.

          (14) Explain the purposes and functions of financial institutions by comparing and contrasting the services the financial institutions provide and evaluate the risks and rewards to persons who borrow and save at those financial institutions.

     (c) Identify the causes of economic change and explain how the economic system of the United States responds to those changes and how other economic systems respond to change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe for-profit and not-for-profit organizations and explain why not-for-profit organizations are exempt from paying certain taxes.

          (2) Explain how investment in either physical capital or human capital improves the standard of living by increasing productivity.

          (3) Determine the advantages and disadvantages of being an entrepreneur.

          (4) Give examples of how specialization is facilitated by trade.

          (5) Illustrate how competition among sellers decreases prices, while competition among buyers increases prices.

          (6) Identify the role of government in a market economy regarding public goods, externalities, monopoly power, redistribution of income and the definition and protection of property rights.

          (7) Discuss the rise of the merchant class, the development of mercantilism and the move toward industrialization.

          (8) Define stereotypical economic systems by contrasting capitalism and socialism, and command economy and market economy.

          (9) Explain ways in which households, schools or community groups allocate resources.

          (10) Explain how the reactions of consumers and producers to changes in prices affects the allocation of resources.

     (d) Explore trends in international trade, the impact of trade on the economy of the United States and the role of exchange rates, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe how the exchange of goods and services around the world creates interdependence among persons in different countries and affects the standard of living in those countries.

          (2) Explain how a change in the exchange rate affects purchasing power.

          (3) Describe the rise of international economies, the emergence of capitalism and the emergence of free markets around the world.

          (4) Explain how governments use tariffs or quotas to restrict trade.

     5.  For the area of civics:

     (a) Know why society needs rules, law and governments, and understand the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain the difference between the rule of law and the rule of mankind, including, without limitation, the difference between the divine right of monarchs and dictatorships.

          (2) Identify major social, political and economic conflicts and analyze the role of compromise in the resolution of those conflicts.

          (3) Describe the significance of the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution as the foundation of democracy in the United States.

          (4) Describe how the Nevada Constitution and the United States Constitution preserve state and national principles and serve as methods of change, including, without limitation, the process for amending a constitution.

          (5) Explain the influence of ancient civilizations on the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens.

          (6) Explain the necessity of protecting personal rights in a democratic society.

          (7) Define the term “popular sovereignty” and explain popular sovereignty and the need for citizen involvement at all levels of government.

          (8) Identify and explain the rights, privileges and responsibilities that are associated with being a citizen of Nevada and the United States, including, without limitation, voting, holding office, serving on a jury and serving in the military.

          (9) Explain the significance of mottos and symbols to the cultural and political identities of various societies.

     (b) Understand the United States Constitution and the government created by the United States Constitution, including, without limitation, the relationship between national and sub-national governments, and the structure and function of state and local governments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Define the term “federalism.”

          (2) Give examples of governmental powers that are distributed between national and state governments, including, without limitation, the power to tax, the power to declare war and the power to issue drivers’ licenses.

          (3) Explain how the Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution defines the relationship between the Federal Government and state governments.

          (4) Explain the purpose of a tribal government.

          (5) Explain the functions of the Executive, Legislative and Judicial Branches of government found in the United States Constitution and the Nevada Constitution.

          (6) Explain the system of checks and balances and the principle of limited powers in the design of the United States Constitution.

          (7) Explain the organization and function of state and local governments.

          (8) Explain the historic compromises that created a two-house Congress and identify the responsibilities of each house.

          (9) Describe the powers of the United States Congress.

          (10) Describe the duties of the President of the United States and other officials within the Executive Branch.

          (11) Describe the function of the United States Supreme Court, including, without limitation, judicial review and the use of landmark court cases.

          (12) Identify the state and local judicial process, including, without limitation, juvenile, civil and criminal court systems.

     (c) Describe the roles of political parties, elections, interest groups, the media and public opinion in the democratic process, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the election process.

          (2) Provide examples of how political parties have changed.

          (3) Identify the impact of interest groups and public opinion on the political process.

          (4) Identify the influence of the media in forming public opinion.

          (5) Identify propaganda and persuasion in political advertising and literature.

          (6) Provide examples of contemporary public issues that may require public solutions.

     (d) Explain the different political systems in the world and how those systems relate to the United States and the citizens of the United States, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Define the characteristics of a country, including, without limitation, sovereignty, territory, population and organized government.

          (2) Define the major political systems of the world, including, without limitation, monarchies, totalitarian dictatorships, presidential systems, parliamentary systems, socialism and communism.

          (3) Identify nations that play a significant role in the foreign policy of the United States.

          (4) Define the term “foreign policy” and describe the ways in which nations interact diplomatically, including, without limitation, through the use of treaties, trade, humanitarian aid and military intervention.

          (5) List and describe international organizations, including, without limitation, the United Nations, the World Bank, Amnesty International and the International Red Cross.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R074-00, eff. 6-20-2000; A by R011-09, 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.381  Sixth through eighth grades: Health. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  Instruction in sixth grade, seventh grade and eighth grade in health must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the eighth grade:

     1.  Comprehend concepts related to the promotion of health and the prevention of disease to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze the relationship between behaviors concerning the health of a person and personal health;

     (b) Identify the behaviors of a person that affect the function and development of the systems of the human body, including, without limitation, the human reproductive system in accordance with NRS 389.065;

     (c) Explain the interrelationships between the physical, emotional, intellectual and social health in adolescence;

     (d) Describe how age, gender, physical activity, lifestyle and heredity affect the nutrient needs of a person;

     (e) Analyze the use of a substance that is beneficial to a person and the use of a substance that is harmful to a person;

     (f) Develop a plan for personal safety to reduce or prevent injuries;

     (g) Examine the likelihood that a person will suffer a serious injury or illness if the person engages in behaviors that increase the risk of such an injury or illness;

     (h) Describe how behaviors of a person, pathogens, heredity and other factors relate to the prevention of illnesses and diseases;

     (i) Discuss how the behaviors concerning the health of a person affect that person’s risk of contracting an illness or a disease;

     (j) Identify the applicable laws and regulations which protect community health; and

     (k) Apply the actions a person may take to contribute to the enhancement of the environment.

     2.  Access reliable health information, products and services to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Describe situations which may require services from providers of health care; and

     (b) Determine the accessibility of products and services that enhance health.

     3.  Practice health-enhancing behaviors and avoid and reduce health risks, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Explain the importance of a person assuming responsibility for healthy behaviors;

     (b) Create a wellness plan that meets dietary guidelines and includes moderate to vigorous physical activity;

     (c) Demonstrate methods of responding to behaviors that put a pupil at risk, including, without limitation, the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs;

     (d) Understand basic procedures in safety, first aid and life-saving measures, including, without limitation, the use of and procedures for using recreational safety equipment;

     (e) Evaluate the behaviors of the pupil that put the pupil at risk for injury, including, without limitation, self-harming behaviors and harmful trends; and

     (f) Analyze the behaviors of a pupil that increase the risk of the pupil spreading communicable diseases, including, without limitation, sexually transmitted diseases, mononucleosis, tuberculosis and influenza.

     4.  Analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology and other factors on behaviors concerning health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Explain how different sources affect the practices and behaviors concerning the health of a person;

     (b) Explain how a person’s perceptions of norms affect the behaviors concerning his or her health and the health-related risks taken by him or her;

     (c) Examine how different sources influence a person’s food choices;

     (d) Examine the influence of family, peers and information on the decision of a person to use, misuse and abuse substances;

     (e) Explain how school policies and public health policies affect the promotion of health and the prevention of diseases; and

     (f) Critique a variety of consumer influences that affect decisions concerning the health of a person.

     5.  Use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and to reduce or avoid health risks, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Practice refusal and negotiation skills that avoid or reduce health risks;

     (b) Express ways to communicate with other persons about the pupil’s perceived body image;

     (c) Practice appropriate methods for responding to situations that present a risk of harm to a person, including, without limitation, situations involving the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs;

     (d) Demonstrate the ways to ask for assistance to enhance the health of the pupil and other persons; and

     (e) Implement refusal and negotiation skills to resolve conflicts.

     6.  Use goal-setting skills to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply skills and strategies for the efficient management of time to reach a long-term personal health goal;

     (b) Analyze how short-term personal health goals and long-term personal health goals change throughout a person’s life; and

     (c) Analyze how short-term personal health goals and long-term personal health goals affect the community and environment.

     7.  Promote and support personal, family and community health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Demonstrate ways to influence and support a person in making positive health choices; and

     (b) Analyze how a message influences community practices affecting the environment and consumer health.

     8.  Use decision-making skills to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Defend the selection of choices that are healthy and eliminate choices that are not healthy when making a decision;

     (b) Compare the short-term and long-term consequences of a person’s choice regarding the use and abuse of substances;

     (c) Compare the short-term and long-term consequences of a person’s health decisions; and

     (d) Apply a decision-making process to a health issue or significant problem.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R032-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R013-09, 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.386  Sixth through eighth grades: Physical education. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of the eighth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for courses in physical education offered in public schools. Instruction in sixth grade, seventh grade and eighth grade in physical education must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the eighth grade:

     1.  Demonstrate competency in the motor skills, patterns of movement and safety practices needed to perform a variety of physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply locomotor and nonlocomotor movements while participating in physical activities;

     (b) Demonstrate manipulative skills in a variety of environments and under several different conditions;

     (c) Execute moderately difficult and complex motor skills and patterns of movement while participating in physical activities; and

     (d) Demonstrate safe practices while participating in physical activities.

     2.  Apply concepts, principles and strategies relating to movement, performance and safety while participating in physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply concepts relating to critical elements of forms of movement to specialized skills while participating in physical activities;

     (b) Carry out multiple game strategies while participating in physical activities; and

     (c) Carry out appropriate practices relating to safety with regard to oneself and other persons while participating in physical activities.

     3.  Participate regularly in physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Participate in a variety of moderate to vigorous physical activities;

     (b) Apply healthy patterns of activity by participating regularly in physical activity; and

     (c) Identify opportunities at school for participation in physical activities on a regular basis.

     4.  Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Develop a plan for physical activity that uses principles of training or conditioning to improve his or her physical fitness; and

     (b) Monitor the physiological effects during various physical activities and levels of intensity of those physical activities.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R033-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R062-13, 2-26-2014)

     NAC 389.3905  Eighth grade: Technology and computers. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the eighth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for technology and computers offered in public schools. Instruction in the eighth grade in technology and computers must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the eighth grade:

     1.  For the areas of creativity and innovation, demonstrate creative thinking, build knowledge and develop innovative products and processes using technology, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Independently apply prior knowledge to develop new ideas, products or processes using digital tools;

     (b) Create an original work in a digital format to demonstrate personal or group expression;

     (c) Use digital models and simulations to answer questions or solve problems; and

     (d) Use technology to track trends, predict possibilities, and make and justify predictions using evidence, experiments and collaboration.

     2.  For the areas of communication and collaboration, use digital media and environments to communicate and work in collaboration with other pupils, including pupils outside of the classroom, to support the learning of the pupil and the learning of other pupils, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Collaborate with other pupils to create and publish digital products for real audiences in a variety of digital environments;

     (b) Communicate information and ideas using digital text, images, sounds and video;

     (c) Create digital products in formats that are appropriate for specific audiences and purposes;

     (d) Use digital resources to communicate with other pupils and persons from a variety of cultures and places;

     (e) Contribute to a group project to produce original works or solve problems; and

     (f) Choose a method of interacting electronically for a specific goal or purpose.

     3.  For the area of fluency of research and information, gather, evaluate and use information, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use digital tools to plan and organize a research-based inquiry;

     (b) For a research project, use digital tools to plan a timeline, track the progress of the project and cite the sources the pupil used for the project;

     (c) Use techniques for advanced searches to locate, access, synthesize and evaluate information in multiple sources to create an original product;

     (d) Use digital tools to organize information with main ideas and supporting documents;

     (e) Evaluate and compare facts and opinions in different sources of digital content and describe the point of view of the content;

     (f) Choose and justify the use of appropriate digital resources to accomplish a variety of tasks;

     (g) Use multiple digital tools to collect and process data to test theories and hypotheses; and

     (h) Use a variety of formats to report results and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of those formats.

     4.  For the areas of critical thinking, problem solving and decision making, use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems and make informed decisions using the digital tools and resources that are appropriate for the specific task, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use digital resources to identify a problem that arises in an everyday situation and develop questions that will guide the pupil in the investigation of the problem;

     (b) Choose the appropriate digital planning tools for a project and use those tools to complete the project;

     (c) Use data, examine patterns and use digital tools to research a problem that arises in an everyday situation and present a solution to the problem; and

     (d) Use multiple processes to explore alternative solutions to and diverse perspectives on problems that arise in everyday situations and use digital tools to present a solution to the problems.

     5.  For the area of the appropriate use of technology, understand human, cultural and societal issues relating to technology and practice legal and ethical behaviors when using technology, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Model legal and ethical behaviors while using information and technology, including, without limitation, properly selecting, acquiring and citing a resource;

     (b) Develop an argument for using technological resources in a safe, legal and responsible manner;

     (c) Explain the value of current and emerging technologies to persons, society and the world;

     (d) Assess the potential of current and emerging technologies to address personal, societal, lifelong learning and career needs; and

     (e) Describe principles of leadership and ways to use current and emerging technologies in a responsible manner to foster leadership skills.

     6.  For the areas of technological operations and concepts, demonstrate an understanding of technological concepts, systems and operations, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Explain the uses for and advantages of technological systems;

     (b) Demonstrate keyboarding skills by completing a variety of assignments in a timely manner;

     (c) Choose and justify the use of digital tools and resources to accomplish a variety of tasks;

     (d) Develop and apply strategies for solving common hardware and software problems; and

     (e) Apply prior knowledge of technology to a current or emerging technology to answer a question that arises in everyday situations.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R038-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R008-10, 6-30-2010)

     NAC 389.391  Eighth grade: Introduction to technology. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A course in the study of biological, informational, communicative and physical technology must include instruction designed to teach the pupil by the completion of the eighth grade to:

     1.  Demonstrate how the evolution in each area of technology has contributed to a progression from the agricultural era to the industrial era to the information era.

     2.  Describe the evolution of a modern tool, device or method within each area of technology and describe how each has changed daily routines and contributed to human progress.

     3.  Describe examples of technological innovation in each area of technology.

     4.  List examples of the seven resources of technology — people, information, tools, materials, capital, energy and time — and identify their different forms.

     5.  Use technological resources to produce a given product.

     6.  Identify technological alternatives for satisfying a given human need in two selected nations of differing cultural conditions and differing amounts of nonrenewable resources.

     7.  Design and carry out an optimal solution to a given technological problem.

     8.  Recognize the limitations of resources which limit solutions to technological problems.

     9.  Describe examples of common technological systems in each area of technology.

     10.  Apply the model for technological systems to the safe assembly or construction and operation of a technological system.

     11.  Demonstrate a functional open-loop system, add feedback to close the loop and operate the system to produce a given result.

     12.  Identify the subsystems of a modern, complex technological system in each area of technology and describe how each is combined to generate a new system resulting in improved or additional human capabilities.

     13.  Demonstrate a technological system in each area of technology and describe results that are desired, undesired, expected and unexpected in one of the areas.

     14.  Identify instances of conflict between a technological system, the human user and the resulting environment made by humans in each area of technology and demonstrate techniques for resolving each instance of conflict.

     15.  Identify instances of conflict between a technological system and the natural environment in each area of technology, and demonstrate techniques for improving each instance of conflict.

     16.  Demonstrate a solution to a problem within each area of technology and identify needed and alternative resources to solve the problem.

     17.  Investigate the properties of various synthetic, raw and biological materials through testing and describe why materials are often chosen on the basis of their properties.

     18.  Demonstrate a functional technological system by substituting the use of different resources to optimize the results of the system within given constraints.

     19.  Demonstrate a variety of traditional and modern processes for converting materials within each area of technology.

     20.  Process information and communicate a message using graphic, photographic or electronic means.

     21.  Use information from data stored in a computer to solve a problem in a technological system.

     22.  Perform a variety of processes for converting energy within each area of technology.

     23.  Use a computer to apply computer software to verify the solution to a problem related to processing resources in a technological system.

     24.  Describe examples of open-loop and closed-loop systems in each area of technology using graphic illustrations.

     25.  Demonstrate how human and technological sensors are used to monitor the results of a technological process.

     26.  Assemble and operate a closed-loop technological system.

     27.  Use a computer to control a technological system.

     28.  Use techniques of extrapolating the effect of changes in society on the future to anticipate the consequences of a new technology.

     29.  Describe how technology has created new jobs and made other jobs obsolete.

     30.  Describe a local, national and global problem, propose alternative technological solutions to each problem and demonstrate a solution to one of the problems.

     31.  Draw and label a diagram depicting a systems approach to solving a problem in each area of technology.

     32.  Use a systems approach to solve a technological problem.

     33.  Use a computer to document progress toward reaching the optimal solution to a technological problem.

     34.  Demonstrate basic math skills and concepts regarding whole numbers, common fractions, decimal fractions and percents in the solution of a technological problem.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-93; A 5-27-92) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.444)

     NAC 389.393  Eighth grade: Home and career skills. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A course of study in home and career skills must include instruction designed to teach the pupil by the completion of the eighth grade to:

     1.  Describe how decisions are made.

     2.  Describe how different types of decisions differ with regard to frequency, level and complexity when given the opportunity to analyze typical activities of teenagers.

     3.  Explain how human needs, wants, values, goals and standards affect decision making when given a variety of life situations.

     4.  Apply the principles of making decisions to given life situations.

     5.  Apply the process of solving problems to a given life situation and select a solution from a group of alternatives.

     6.  Demonstrate how human and nonhuman resources can be used to accomplish a given task.

     7.  Apply the principles of management to demonstrate the interchangeable nature of resources.

     8.  Demonstrate the interrelationship among the skills of decision making, problem solving and management.

     9.  Relate self concept and factors which affect its formation and development to the pupil’s own situation.

     10.  Recognize that personal judgments of others are affected by appearance, behavior and gender.

     11.  Establish a goal for personal improvement.

     12.  Identify and resolve concerns common to adolescents.

     13.  Apply the skills of decision making, problem solving and management to attain a goal established for personal improvement.

     14.  Develop a plan to manage personal time that incorporates personal values, standards and goals.

     15.  Analyze the influence of peers and “significant others” on personal development.

     16.  Analyze the influence of the family on personal development.

     17.  Develop communication skills used in interpersonal relationships.

     18.  Recognize the adolescent’s role in providing for the needs of others who are dependent upon him or her.

     19.  Analyze how roles and responsibilities change in relation to personal development.

     20.  Identify the factors that influence the practices of the consumer.

     21.  Identify the rights and responsibilities of the consumer and the alternative choices that a consumer possesses regarding money, nutrition, wardrobe and the management of his or her personal environment.

     22.  Demonstrate skills related to comparative shopping.

     23.  Apply the principles of managing money to a personal spending plan.

     24.  Evaluate safe, efficient and profitable methods of saving money to manage personal resources.

     25.  Apply procedures that will protect personal money and avoid unnecessary risks.

     26.  Describe the significance of the cultural, social, psychological, biological, economic, political, global and leisure conditions which affect a person’s choice of food.

     27.  Evaluate dietary patterns to meet nutritional needs.

     28.  Apply the skills of decision making, problem solving and management to purchasing food and preparing meals.

     29.  Plan a wardrobe and accessories based on personal wants, values and finances.

     30.  Demonstrate care and maintenance of a personal wardrobe and accessories.

     31.  Describe the human need for personal privacy and the respect for the property of others.

     32.  Apply the skills of decision making, problem solving and management in selecting, using and maintaining living accommodations.

     33.  Identify the reasons for working, using descriptions of different work environments.

     34.  Identify characteristics of workers that contribute to individual and group success.

     35.  Predict the effects of technology and the changing roles of society on work and workers in the 21st century.

     36.  Apply the skills of decision making, problem solving and management to planning a career.

     37.  Determine alternative career interests and the suitability of entrepreneurship as a career choice.

     38.  Analyze factors that lead to the success of a small enterprise.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.442)

     NAC 389.395  Seventh and eighth grades: Required courses where subjects taught by different teachers. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185)  The following courses of study are required for the seventh and eighth grades where the subjects offered by the school are taught by different teachers:

     1.  Mathematics.

     2.  Science.

     3.  Social studies, which must include instruction in at least three of the following areas by completion of the eighth grade:

     (a) Civics.

     (b) Economics.

     (c) The history of Nevada.

     (d) The history of the United States.

     (e) The geography of the world.

     4.  English language arts.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87; A 1-26-90; 5-27-92; R076-99, 11-4-99; R074-00, 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.402  Eighth grade: Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the eighth grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts for the eighth grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the eighth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for English language arts offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2011-2012 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the eighth grade in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of the eighth grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.407  Eighth grade: Common Core Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for the eighth grade are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards in mathematics for the eighth grade may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of the eighth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2013-2014 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in the eighth grade in mathematics must be designed so that by the completion of the eighth grade, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, eff. 5-30-2012; A by R019-11, 5-30-2012, eff. 7-1-2013)

     NAC 389.411  Sixth through eighth grades: Science. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of the sixth grade, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for science offered in public schools. Instruction in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades in science must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of the eighth grade:

     1.  For the area of physical science, understand:

     (a) Matter and its interactions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop models to demonstrate the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.

          (2) Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.

          (3) Gather and analyze information to describe that synthetic materials are derived from natural resources and impact society.

          (4) Develop a model that demonstrates predictions and changes in the particle motion, temperature and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.

          (5) Develop and use a model to demonstrate that the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and that mass is therefore conserved.

          (6) Undertake a design project to construct, test and modify a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.

     (b) The forces and interactions which affect motion and stability, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Apply Newton’s third law of motion to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objects.

          (2) Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.

          (3) Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electrical and magnetic forces.

          (4) Construct and present arguments using evidence to support the claim that gravitational interactions are attractive and depend on the masses of interacting objects.

          (5) Conduct an investigation and evaluate the experimental design to provide evidence that fields exist between objects exerting forces on each other even though the objects are not in contact.

     (c) Energy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Construct and interpret graphical displays of data to describe the relationship of kinetic energy to the mass of an object and to the speed of an object.

          (2) Develop a model to demonstrate that, when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.

          (3) Apply scientific principles to design, construct and test a device that either minimizes or maximizes the transfer of thermal energy.

          (4) Plan an investigation to determine the relationships among the energy transferred, the type of matter, the mass and the change in the average kinetic energy of particles as measured by the temperature of the sample.

          (5) Construct, use and present arguments to support the claim that when the kinetic energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object.

     (d) Waves and their application in technology for the transfer of information, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use mathematical representations to describe a simple model for waves that includes how the amplitude of a wave is related to the energy in the wave.

          (2) Develop and use a model to demonstrate that waves are reflected, absorbed or transmitted through various materials.

          (3) Integrate qualitative scientific and technical information to support the claim that digitized signals are a more reliable way to encode and transmit information than analog signals.

     2.  For the area of life science, understand:

     (a) The structures and processes from molecules to organisms, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells and that some living things consist of one cell while others consist of many different numbers and types of cells.

          (2) Develop and use a model to demonstrate the function of a cell as a whole and the ways in which the parts of a cell contribute to that function.

          (3) Use arguments supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.

          (4) Use arguments based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to explain how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants, respectively.

          (5) Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.

          (6) Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and the flow of energy into and out of organisms.

          (7) Develop a model to demonstrate how food is rearranged through chemical reactions by forming new molecules that support growth or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.

          (8) Gather and synthesize information that sensory receptors respond to stimuli by sending messages to the brain for immediate behavior or storage as memories.

     (b) The interactions, energy and dynamics of ecosystems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence of the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

          (2) Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

          (3) Develop a model to demonstrate the manner in which matter cycles and energy flows among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

          (4) Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

          (5) Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

     (c) The inheritance and variation of traits of heredity, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop and use a model to demonstrate why structural changes to genes located on chromosomes, known as mutations, may affect proteins and may result in harmful, beneficial or neutral effects to the structure and function of the organism.

          (2) Develop and use a model to demonstrate why asexual reproduction results in offspring with identical genetic information and sexual reproduction results in offspring with genetic variation.

     (d) The unity and diversity of biological evolution, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction and change of life forms throughout the history of life on earth, assuming that natural laws operate the same today as in the past.

          (2) Apply scientific concepts to construct explanations for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms and between modern and fossil organisms to infer evolutionary relationships.

          (3) Analyze displays of pictorial data to compare patterns of similarities in the embryological development across multiple species to identify relationships not evident in the fully formed anatomy.

          (4) Construct an explanation based on evidence that describes how genetic variations of traits in a population increase the probability that some members of the population will survive and reproduce in a specific environment.

          (5) Gather and synthesize information about technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms.

          (6) Use mathematical representations to support explanations of how natural selection may lead to increases and decreases of specific traits in populations over time.

     3.  For the area of earth science, understand:

     (a) The earth’s place in the universe, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop and use a model of the earth-sun-moon system to demonstrate the cyclical patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon and the seasons.

          (2) Develop and use a model to demonstrate the role of gravity in the way in which things move within galaxies and the solar system.

          (3) Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.

          (4) Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence from rock strata for how the geologic time scale is used to organize the 4.6-billion-year-old history of earth.

     (b) The earth’s systems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop a model to demonstrate the cycling of the earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.

          (2) Construct an explanation based on evidence for how geoscientific processes have changed the earth’s surface at varying times and spatial scales.

          (3) Analyze and interpret data regarding the distribution of fossils and rocks, continental shapes and seafloor structures to provide evidence of past plate motions.

          (4) Develop a model to demonstrate the cycling of water through the earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

          (5) Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions.

          (6) Develop and use a model to demonstrate how unequal heating and rotation of the earth cause patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation that determine regional climates.

     (c) The earth and human activity on earth, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distributions of the mineral, energy and groundwater resources of the earth are the result of past and current geoscientific processes.

          (2) Analyze and interpret data regarding natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events for use in the development of technologies to mitigate the effects of such hazards and events.

          (3) Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing human impacts on the environment.

          (4) Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in the human population and per capita consumption of natural resources impact the earth’s systems.

          (5) Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century.

     4.  For the area of engineering technology, understand design, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and the potential impacts on humans and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

     (b) Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well the solutions meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

     (c) Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each solution that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.

     (d) Develop a model to generate data for iterative testing and modification of a proposed object, tool or process, such that an optimal design can be achieved.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R075-99, eff. 11-4-99; A by R041-05, 10-31-2005; R084-13, 6-23-2014; R141-14, 10-27-2015)

Elective Courses of Study

     NAC 389.443  The arts: Instruction in sixth through eighth grades. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.520)  Each pupil who elects to take a class in the arts in the sixth, seventh or eighth grade must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for the elected course of study that is offered in the public elementary schools. Instruction in the arts in the sixth, seventh or eighth grade must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards of performance by the completion of the eighth grade:

     1.  For the area of music:

     (a) Sing a varied repertoire of music alone and with others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to sing:

          (1) With expression, technical accuracy, good breath control and correct intonation, articulation and rhythm throughout the singing ranges of the pupil while singing alone and with others;

          (2) In small and large ensembles while following a conductor; and

          (3) A repertoire in two and three parts, with and without accompaniment, maintaining the pupil’s own part.

     (b) Perform a varied repertoire of music on instruments alone and with others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to play:

          (1) With expression, technical accuracy and appropriate ensemble skills on at least one instrument and with a varied repertoire with a level of musical difficulty of 2 in small and large ensembles while following a conductor;

          (2) A mixed-meter repertoire, making a smooth transition from one meter to another; and

          (3) Diverse genres with stylistic accuracy and appropriate expression.

     (c) Improvise melodies, variations and accompaniments as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to improvise:

          (1) Simple musical phrases in a given key;

          (2) Simple harmonies in a given key; and

          (3) Melodic and rhythmic embellishments on given pentatonic melodies.

     (d) Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compose short pieces of music in groups using the elements of music; and

          (2) Arrange simple pieces of music for voices or instruments.

     (e) Read and notate music as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Read whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth and dotted notes and rests in various meters through speaking or body percussion in two or three parts;

          (2) Read simple melodies in clefs that are appropriate for the pupil;

          (3) Apply standard symbols of music within the context of the repertoire with a level of musical difficulty of 2;

          (4) Sight-read music with technical accuracy and expression and with a level of musical difficulty of 1; and

          (5) Use standard notation to record simple musical ideas.

     (f) Listen to, analyze and describe music as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Apply knowledge of rhythm, melody and musical forms to aural examples using musical terminology that is appropriate; and

          (2) Describe the uses of the elements of music in aural examples representing diverse genres and cultures.

     (g) Evaluate music and musical performances as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop musical criteria for evaluating the quality and effectiveness of performances and compositions; and

          (2) Evaluate the quality of the pupil’s own performance and composition and the performances and compositions of others and offer justification for his or her evaluation.

     (h) Demonstrate relationships between music, the other arts and disciplines outside the arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to compare:

          (1) Similar themes found in music and other art forms; and

          (2) Concepts common to music and other disciplines outside the arts.

     (i) Demonstrate knowledge of the historical periods and cultural diversity of music, including, without limitation, the ability to discuss:

          (1) Distinguishing characteristics of styles of music from various historical periods and cultures; and

          (2) The roles of musicians and the conditions under which they perform in several cultures of the world and in various historical periods.

     2.  For the area of theater:

     (a) Understand the components of theatrical production, including, without limitation, scriptwriting, directing and production as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Create an original script that is properly formatted, incorporating a cast of characters, prop list, costume list, simple stage directions and technical needs;

          (2) Use vocabulary that is appropriate for stage directing to direct actors or to be directed on stage;

          (3) Explain the roles and responsibilities of the various personnel involved in a stage production;

          (4) Explain the intention of the playwright in a play;

          (5) Design and create a program and one of the following promotional materials for production:

               (I) Posters;

               (II) Flyers;

               (III) Tickets; or

               (IV) Public service announcements;

          (6) Work in a group and in a safe manner to design and construct a unit set for a production;

          (7) Design and assemble all the props, costumes and makeup for characters with attention to age, culture and overall interpretation of a production;

          (8) Describe simple sound and lighting effects for any dramatized event; and

          (9) Implement specific sound effects and suggested lighting conditions for a dramatized event.

     (b) Understand and demonstrate the role of the actor in the theater as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Examine the text to determine logically the actions and intentions of a character;

          (2) Use basic acting skills, including, without limitation, focus, concentration, breathing and vocal techniques, memory and sensory recall, and physical movement; and

          (3) Portray characters that are believable to an audience in informal productions.

     (c) Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in theater, film, television and electronic media as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Write a review of a dramatized production that addresses two or more of the elements of theater;

          (2) Present through any artistic media a clear representation of the emotional impact on an audience of the visual, aural or kinesthetic elements of a performance; and

          (3) In most instances, differentiate between farce, satire, high and low comedy, and epic tragedy.

     (d) Recognize and explain how theatrical experiences contribute to a better understanding of history, culture and human relationships as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Cite two examples from theater that give historical and cultural information; and

          (2) Give reasons for conflicts among characters.

     (e) Make connections between theater and other academic disciplines as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Find common components used in at least two works from two of the three areas of the arts and explain how they relate to one another;

          (2) Identify and explain the roots of theater in western civilization; and

          (3) Describe how three scientific advances have improved dramatic events.

     3.  For the area of visual arts:

     (a) Know and apply media, techniques and processes for developing visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare and contrast the use of media, techniques and processes in works of visual art;

          (2) Give purposeful responses to the use of media, technique and processes; and

          (3) Communicate ideas and experiences through the works of visual art of the pupil using media, techniques and processes.

     (b) Use knowledge of characteristics, purposes and functions of the visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Define and evaluate the effects of visual characteristics in works of visual art;

          (2) Define and evaluate the effects of purposes in works of visual art;

          (3) Discuss the effectiveness of visual characteristics, purposes and functions in works of visual art; and

          (4) Use various visual characteristics to communicate original ideas in the works of visual art of the pupil.

     (c) Choose, apply and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discuss the visual, spatial, temporal and formal aspects of a work of visual art as it relates to history and culture;

          (2) Plan and create an original work of visual art that uses subject matter, symbols and ideas which demonstrate knowledge of culture; and

          (3) Discuss in groups whether subject matter, symbols and ideas successfully convey an intended result to the audience.

     (d) Understand the visual arts in relation to history and culture as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Discover and organize visual characteristics of selected works of visual art with regard to history and culture;

          (2) Describe and discuss the purposes and meanings of works of visual art from various cultures, times and places; and

          (3) Create a work of visual art based on cultural research that shows how time and place influence visual characteristics of the work.

     (e) Analyze and assess characteristics, merits and meaning in the pupil’s own works of visual art and the works of others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain works of visual art based on themes, styles, purposes and subject matter;

          (2) Compare and contrast the degrees of merit in works of visual art;

          (3) Analyze and generate new interpretations of works of visual art; and

          (4) Develop and explain, with guidance from the teacher, an aesthetic position and use it to critique a work of visual art.

     (f) Demonstrate relationships between the visual arts, the other arts and disciplines outside the arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain how the principles of the visual arts are similar to principles of other disciplines;

          (2) Discover and explain the relationships between the visual arts and other arts in terms of principles and subject matter; and

          (3) Create a work of visual art that reflects principles common to the arts and multiple disciplines.

     4.  As used in this section:

     (a) “High comedy” means farce and satirical forms of comedy.

     (b) “Low comedy” means burlesque and slapstick forms of comedy.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

Requirements for Promotion to High School

     NAC 389.445  Required units of credit; pupils with disabilities; pupils who transfer between schools; recognition of certain programs of homeschool study. (NRS 385.080, 392.033)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 4, a pupil must earn at least the following units of credit during the seventh and eighth grades for promotion to high school:

     (a) One and one-half units of credit in English with a passing grade;

     (b) One and one-half units of credit in mathematics with a passing grade;

     (c) One unit of credit in science with a passing grade; and

     (d) One unit of credit in social studies with a passing grade.

     2.  A pupil may apply units of credit toward promotion to high school if the pupil earned the units of credit:

     (a) At a public or private junior high or middle school located in this State.

     (b) At a public or private junior high or middle school located outside of this State if the school district approves a transfer of the units in accordance with the procedure adopted by the board of trustees of the school district pursuant to subsection 3 of NRS 392.033.

     (c) At the Nevada Youth Training Center or the Caliente Youth Center.

     (d) During summer school in courses offered by a public or private junior high or middle school. Such units must be earned in courses which are equivalent to the courses offered in the programs of the junior high or middle school in which the pupil is enrolled.

     (e) While being homeschooled in this State or homeschooled outside of this State if the school district approves the units in accordance with NRS 392.033.

     3.  If a pupil earns units of credit for sectarian religious courses, he or she may not apply those units toward promotion to high school.

     4.  A pupil with a disability who is enrolled in a program of special education may be promoted to high school if the pupil meets the requirements for promotion to high school that are prescribed in his or her individualized educational program.

     5.  If a pupil transfers to a junior high or middle school from a junior high or middle school in this State or from a school outside of this State, the courses of study and units of credit completed by the pupil before transferring must be evaluated by the school district that the pupil transfers to in accordance with the procedure adopted by the board of trustees of the school district pursuant to subsection 3 of NRS 392.033.

     6.  For purposes of paragraph (a) of subsection 5 of NRS 392.033, the board of trustees of a school district may consider recognition of the programs of homeschool study accredited by a national or regional accrediting association recognized by the board of trustees of the school district.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R064-98, eff. 9-9-98; A by R076-99, 11-4-99; R015-06, 9-18-2007; R154-07, 1-30-2008; R037-12, 9-14-2012)

HIGH SCHOOL

Required Courses of Study

     NAC 389.450  Prescribed courses of study for graduation. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360, 389.0185)  In addition to the courses of study required in chapter 389 of NRS, the State Board of Education prescribes the following courses of study for graduation from a public high school:

     1.  Arts and humanities, or career and technical education;

     2.  Health education;

     3.  English;

     4.  Mathematics, which may include the following courses of study:

     (a) Basic mathematics;

     (b) Mathematics for everyday living;

     (c) Prealgebra;

     (d) Algebra I;

     (e) Geometry;

     (f) Algebra II;

     (g) Trigonometry;

     (h) Analytic geometry;

     (i) Precalculus;

     (j) Calculus; and

     (k) Probability and statistics;

     5.  Physical education or personal fitness;

     6.  Science, which may include the following courses of study:

     (a) Life science;

     (b) Earth science;

     (c) Physical science;

     (d) Environmental science; and

     (e) General science;

     7.  Use of computers, which may include the following courses of study:

     (a) Accounting and computing;

     (b) Processing business information;

     (c) Word processing;

     (d) Introduction to computers;

     (e) Application of computers; and

     (f) Science of computers; and

     8.  Academic achievement, career exploration, and personal and social development.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A 5-4-87; 5-19-88; 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92; 3-27-92, eff. 9-1-92; 10-8-93; R061-02, 9-6-2002; R010-03, 10-30-2003; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006)

     NAC 389.452  Arts and humanities. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185)  The required course of study in arts and humanities may be one of the following:

     1.  Visual arts.

     2.  Music.

     3.  Theater.

     4.  World language.

     5.  Other courses which are submitted to and approved by the State Board of Education, which may include the following:

     (a) American literature.

     (b) Mythology.

     (c) The novel.

     (d) Shakespearean literature.

     (e) The short story.

     (f) Modern literature.

     (g) English literature.

     (h) World literature.

     (i) Creative writing.

     (j) The history of humans.

     (k) Psychology.

     (l) Creative thinking.

     (m) Humanities.

     (n) Sociology.

     (o) Cultural anthropology.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87; A 5-19-88; R073-00, 6-20-2000; R063-14, 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.455  Health. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  Instruction in high school in health must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of high school:

     1.  Comprehend concepts related to the promotion of health and the prevention of disease to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Evaluate the effect of family history, health choices and level of stress on the health of a person;

     (b) Formulate a strategy for personal health that includes the use of self-reflection to achieve overall wellness;

     (c) Apply knowledge of food and nutrient needs when making decisions regarding food choices and meal plans;

     (d) Apply knowledge of physical activity and health to develop a plan for daily activity;

     (e) Analyze the physiological, psychological and social effects of the use and abuse of a substance;

     (f) Examine ways to reduce or prevent injuries and violence;

     (g) Analyze the potential for injury, illness or death which results from a person engaging in behavior that increases health risks;

     (h) Evaluate the effects of advances in research and medicine on the prevention and control of illnesses and diseases;

     (i) Analyze the influence of the environment on the health of a person and the health of the community; and

     (j) Explain the role of consumers in preventing the spread of illness and disease.

     2.  Access reliable health information, products and services to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Evaluate the validity of health information, products and services; and

     (b) Use resources, including, without limitation, resources from home, school and the community, that provide reliable information regarding health products and services.

     3.  Practice health-enhancing behaviors and avoid and reduce health risks, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze a variety of behaviors that avoid or reduce health risks to the pupil and others;

     (b) Implement a wellness plan that meets dietary guidelines and includes moderate to vigorous physical activity;

     (c) Evaluate the behaviors of the pupil for the use and abuse of substances;

     (d) Demonstrate practices and behaviors to avoid injury and reduce the risk of injury to the pupil or other persons, including, without limitation, refraining from driving while impaired, using a safety belt, refraining from fighting and avoiding self-harming behaviors; and

     (e) Evaluate the responsibility of a pupil in promoting health and avoiding or reducing behaviors that increase health risks to the pupil or other persons.

     4.  Analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology and other factors on behaviors concerning health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze how different sources support and challenge beliefs, practices and behaviors concerning the health of a person;

     (b) Analyze how a person’s perceptions of norms affect the behaviors concerning his or her health and the health-related risks taken by him or her;

     (c) Evaluate different sources that influence a person’s food choices and physical activity habits;

     (d) Conduct a self-evaluation of the influence of different sources on the development of values regarding the use and abuse of substances, including, without limitation, prescription medications and over-the-counter medications;

     (e) Analyze current events and the influence of those events on the promotion of health and the prevention of disease; and

     (f) Evaluate the impact of media and technology on the health of a person, a family and the community.

     5.  Use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and to reduce or avoid health risks, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Apply refusal, negotiation and collaboration skills to enhance health;

     (b) Communicate acceptance of the physical and developmental characteristics of the pupil and other persons;

     (c) Implement communication skills to enhance the ability of the pupil to make responsible decisions regarding the use and abuse of substances; and

     (d) Apply strategies to prevent or resolve conflicts without harming the pupil or other persons.

     6.  Use goal-setting skills to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Implement strategies to monitor the progress of the pupil toward achieving a short-term personal health goal and a long-term personal health goal;

     (b) Execute a plan that addresses the pupil’s strengths, needs and risks in achieving short-term personal health goals and long-term personal health goals; and

     (c) Create a plan of action toward improving the community and environment.

     7.  Promote and support personal, family and community health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Implement activities that influence and support a person in making positive health choices; and

     (b) Design a message that enhances and promotes community health.

     8.  Use decision-making skills to enhance health, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Formulate a plan to effectively enhance personal health;

     (b) Evaluate the effectiveness of making decisions regarding the use and abuse of substances;

     (c) Determine the benefits of applying a thoughtful decision-making process in situations concerning health; and

     (d) Examine barriers in the community that impede the ability to make healthy decisions.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R032-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R013-09, 10-27-2009)

     NAC 389.4612  Common Core Standards for English language arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187, 389.520)

     1.  The Common Core Standards for English language arts developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for high school are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core Standards for English language arts may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of high school, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for English language arts.

     3.  For the 2012-2013 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in high school in English language arts must be designed so that by the completion of high school, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R019-11, 5-30-2012, eff. 7-1-2012)

     NAC 389.4645  Common Core State Standards for mathematics. (NRS 385.010, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.0187)

     1.  The Common Core State Standards for mathematics developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative for high school are hereby adopted by reference as those standards existed on June 2, 2010. A copy of the Common Core State Standards for mathematics may be obtained at no cost from the Common Core State Standards Initiative on the Internet at http://www.corestandards.org.

     2.  By the beginning of high school, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for courses in mathematics offered in public schools.

     3.  For the 2014-2015 school year and each school year thereafter, instruction in mathematics in high school must be designed so that by the completion of high school, pupils meet the standards adopted pursuant to subsection 1.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R083-14, eff. 8-10-2015)

     NAC 389.485  Physical education. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the end of high school, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for courses in physical education offered in public schools. Instruction in high school in physical education must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of high school:

     1.  Demonstrate competency in motor skills, patterns of movement and safety practices needed to perform a variety of physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Demonstrate proficiency in multiple forms of movement while participating in physical activities;

     (b) Perform manipulative skills in combination with locomotor or nonlocomotor movements in a variety of environments and under several different conditions;

     (c) Execute complex motor skills and various patterns of movement while participating in physical activities; and

     (d) Demonstrate safe practices while participating in physical activities.

     2.  Apply concepts, principles and strategies relating to movement, performance and safety while participating in physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze complex motor skills while participating in physical activities;

     (b) Analyze game strategies used while participating in physical activities to improve skills relating to movement; and

     (c) Demonstrate appropriate practices relating to safety with regard to oneself and other persons while participating in physical activities.

     3.  Participate regularly in physical activities, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Participate in a variety of moderate to vigorous physical activities;

     (b) Apply lifelong healthy patterns of activity by participating regularly in physical activity; and

     (c) Identify opportunities at school for participation in physical activities on a regular basis.

     4.  Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Develop a plan for exercise and physical activity that uses data related to the pupil’s individual fitness to improve his or her physical fitness; and

     (b) Analyze health and fitness benefits arising from participating in various physical activities.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R033-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R062-13, 2-26-2014)

     NAC 389.488  Exemption from physical education. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)

     1.  A school district shall exempt a pupil from taking the course in physical education if the pupil requests the exemption on the basis of his or her:

     (a) Physical or mental condition, and the request is supported by a written statement from a physician;

     (b) Religious belief, and the request is supported by a written statement from the pupil’s parent or guardian;

     (c) Enrollment in the Reserve Officer Training Corps; or

     (d) Intended enrollment in a program which is comparable to the course in physical education.

     2.  If a pupil requests an exemption based on his or her intended enrollment in a program which is comparable to the course in physical education, the school district shall furnish the Superintendent of Public Instruction with a syllabus of that program. Upon the Superintendent’s written approval, the school district shall grant the exemption.

     3.  A school district shall exempt a pupil from not more than one credit in physical education if the pupil participates in interscholastic athletics, on a drill team, in a marching band, in a dance group or on a cheerleading squad if:

     (a) The activity is sponsored by the school; and

     (b) The pupil actively participates in the activity for at least 120 hours.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A 5-4-87) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.070)

     NAC 389.491  Science: Generally. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.019, 389.520)  A local school district shall ensure that pupils, by the completion of the 12th grade, are able to comply with the performance standards required for science which are adopted by the State Board of Education pursuant to NAC 389.239, 389.24245, 389.244, 389.284, 389.2936, 389.2939, 389.411 and 389.4915. In carrying out this requirement, the district shall:

     1.  Develop courses which must encompass all of the performance standards required for science by the completion of the 12th grade; and

     2.  Provide to each pupil, upon enrollment in high school, a listing of the courses that encompass all of the performance standards required for science by the completion of the 12th grade.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 3-27-92; A by R076-99, 11-4-99; R041-05, 10-31-2005; R084-13, 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.4915  Science: Standards. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of high school, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for science offered in public schools. Instruction in high school in science must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of high school:

     1.  For the area of physical science, understand:

     (a) Matter and its interactions, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.

          (2) Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.

          (3) Plan and conduct an investigation by gathering evidence to compare the structure of substances at the bulk scale to infer the strength of electrical forces between particles.

          (4) Develop a model to illustrate that the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends upon the changes in total bond energy.

          (5) Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.

          (6) Refine the design of a chemical system by specifying a change in conditions that produce increased amounts of products at equilibrium.

          (7) Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.

          (8) Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion and radioactive decay.

     (b) The forces and interactions which affect motion and stability, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, including its mass and acceleration.

          (2) Use mathematical representations to support the claim that the total momentum of a system of objects is conserved when there is no net force on the system.

          (3) Apply scientific and engineering concepts to design, evaluate and refine a device that minimizes the force on a macroscopic object during a collision.

          (4) Use mathematical representations of Newton’s law of universal gravitation and Coulomb’s law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects.

          (5) Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that an electrical current can produce a magnetic field and that a changing magnetic field can produce an electrical current.

          (6) Communicate scientific and technical information about the importance of molecular-level structure in the functioning of designed materials.

     (c) Energy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Create a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of all other components and energy flows in and out of the system are known.

          (2) Develop and use models to illustrate that energy at the macroscopic scale can be accounted for as a combination of energy associated with the motions of particles that comprise objects and energy associated with the relative position of particles that comprise objects.

          (3) Design, build and refine a device that works within given constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

          (4) Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that the transfer of thermal energy when two components of different temperatures are combined within a closed system results in a more uniform energy distribution among the components in the system as described by the second law of thermodynamics.

          (5) Develop and use a model of two objects interacting through electrical or magnetic fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects because of the interaction.

     (d) Waves and their application in technology for the transfer of information, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength and speed of waves traveling through various media.

          (2) Evaluate questions about the advantages of using digital transmission and storage of information.

          (3) Evaluate the claims, evidence and reasoning for describing electromagnetic radiation by a wave model or a particle model and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other.

          (4) Evaluate the validity and reliability of claims in published materials of the effects of different frequencies of electromagnetic radiation when absorbed by matter.

          (5) Communicate technical information about the use by some technological devices of the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.

     2.  For the area of life science, understand:

     (a) The structures and processes from molecules to organisms, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Construct an explanation based on evidence for the manner in which the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.

          (2) Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.

          (3) Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.

          (4) Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division, known as mitosis, and cellular differentiation in the production and maintenance of complex organisms.

          (5) Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy.

          (6) Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence concerning the manner in which carbon, hydrogen and oxygen from sugar molecules may combine with other elements to form amino acids or other large carbon-based molecules.

          (7) Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed, resulting in a net transfer of energy.

     (b) The interactions, energy and dynamics of ecosystems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use mathematical or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect the carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales.

          (2) Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.

          (3) Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

          (4) Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.

          (5) Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere.

          (6) Evaluate the claims, evidence and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, while changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.

          (7) Design, evaluate and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.

          (8) Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on the chances of individuals and species to survive and reproduce.

     (c) The inheritance and variation of traits of heredity, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to their offspring.

          (2) Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from new genetic combinations through meiosis, viable errors occurring during replication or mutations caused by environmental factors.

          (3) Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.

     (d) The unity and diversity of biological evolution, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence.

          (2) Construct an explanation based on evidence that the process of evolution primarily results from four factors:

               (I) The potential for a species to increase in number;

               (II) The heritable genetic variation of individuals of a species from mutation and sexual reproduction;

               (III) Competition for limited resources; and

               (IV) The proliferation of those organisms that are better able to survive and reproduce in the environment.

          (3) Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support explanations that organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to organisms lacking this trait.

          (4) Construct an explanation based on evidence for how natural selection leads to the adaptation of populations.

          (5) Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in increases in the number of members of some species, the emergence of new species over time and the extinction of other species.

          (6) Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate the adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.

     3.  For the area of earth science, understand:

     (a) The earth’s place in the universe, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop a model based on evidence to illustrate the life span of the sun and the role of nuclear fusion in the sun’s core to release energy that eventually reaches earth in the form of radiation.

          (2) Construct an explanation of the big bang theory based on astronomical evidence of light spectra, motion of distant galaxies and composition of matter in the universe.

          (3) Communicate scientific concepts about the way stars, over their life cycle, produce elements.

          (4) Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system.

          (5) Evaluate evidence of the past and current movements of continental and oceanic crust and the theory of plate tectonics to explain the ages of crustal rocks.

          (6) Apply scientific reasoning and evidence from ancient materials from the earth, meteorites and other planetary surfaces to construct an account of the formation and early history of the earth.

     (b) The earth’s systems, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop a model to illustrate how the internal and surface processes of earth operate at different spatial and temporal scales to form continental and ocean-floor features.

          (2) Analyze geoscientific data to make the claim that one change to the surface of the earth can create feedback that causes changes to the other systems of the earth.

          (3) Develop a model based on evidence of the interior of the earth to demonstrate the cycling of matter by thermal convection.

          (4) Use a model to demonstrate how variations in the flow of energy into and out of the earth’s systems result in changes in climate.

          (5) Plan and conduct an investigation of the properties of water and its effects on the materials and surface processes of the earth.

          (6) Develop a quantitative model to demonstrate the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere and biosphere.

          (7) Construct an argument based on evidence about the simultaneous co-evolution of the earth’s systems and life on earth.

     (c) The earth and human activity on earth, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Construct an explanation based on evidence regarding the availability of natural resources, the occurrence of natural hazards and the changes in climate and their influence on human activity.

          (2) Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on cost-benefit ratios.

          (3) Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations and biodiversity.

          (4) Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces the impact of human activities on natural systems.

          (5) Analyze geoscientific data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate changes and associated future impacts to the earth’s systems.

          (6) Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among the earth’s systems and how those relationships are being modified by human activity.

     4.  For the area of engineering technology, understand design, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.

     (b) Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

     (c) Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including, without limitation, cost, safety, reliability and aesthetics, as well as possible social, cultural and environmental impacts.

     (d) Use a computer simulation to model the impact of proposed solutions to a complex real-world problem with numerous criteria and constraints on interactions within and between systems relevant to the problem.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R075-99, eff. 11-4-99; A by R041-05, 10-31-2005; R084-13, 6-23-2014; R141-14, 10-27-2015)

     NAC 389.505  Technology and computers. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of high school, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for technology and computers offered in public schools. Instruction in high school in technology and computers must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of high school:

     1.  For the areas of creativity and innovation, demonstrate creative thinking, build knowledge and develop innovative products and processes using technology, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Independently or in collaboration with other pupils, apply prior and newly acquired knowledge to develop new ideas, products or processes using digital tools;

     (b) Create an original work using digital tools, including, without limitation, tools for planning, researching, editing and producing the original work;

     (c) Develop digital models or simulations to answer questions or solve problems; and

     (d) Use technology to conduct research, conduct experiments and report data from the experiments to determine trends and possibilities and use evidence to make and justify predictions.

     2.  For the areas of communication and collaboration, use digital media and environments to communicate and work in collaboration with other pupils, including pupils outside of the classroom, to support the learning of the pupil and the learning of other pupils, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Collaborate electronically with other pupils, persons and experts to create and publish digital products for real audiences;

     (b) Create digital text, images, sound and video for use in a communication;

     (c) Critique the appropriateness of digital formats for specific audiences and purposes;

     (d) Interact electronically with groups of persons who are culturally diverse for specific purposes;

     (e) Contribute electronically to a group project that identifies a problem, present solutions to the problem and evaluate those solutions; and

     (f) Choose and justify a method of electronically interacting with other persons for a specific goal or purpose.

     3.  For the area of fluency of research and information, gather, evaluate and use information, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Use digital tools to plan, organize and critique research-based inquiries;

     (b) For a research project, use digital tools to plan a timeline, track the progress of the project and cite the sources the pupil used for the project;

     (c) Use techniques of advanced searches to locate, access, synthesize and evaluate information in multiple sources to create an original product for a real audience;

     (d) Use digital tools to organize and compare information with main ideas and supporting documents;

     (e) Use digital resources to assemble and evaluate facts, opinions and points of view that are appropriate for a specific task;

     (f) Evaluate how other pupils use resources that are appropriate for a specific task;

     (g) Use multiple digital tools to analyze data and critique theories and hypotheses; and

     (h) Evaluate digital formats for reporting results to a variety of audiences and justify the use of those formats.

     4.  For the areas of critical thinking, problem solving and decision making, use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems and make informed decisions using the digital tools and resources that are appropriate for the specific task, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Identify a complex issue, develop a systematic plan for the investigation of the issue and present innovative solutions to the issue;

     (b) Analyze the capabilities and limitations of different digital planning tools for developing solutions or completing a project;

     (c) Choose and apply digital tools to collect, organize and analyze data to evaluate theories or test hypotheses; and

     (d) Use multiple processes to consider diverse perspectives on a problem that arises in an everyday situation, use digital resources to derive original solutions to the problem and assess the potential of those resources to address the social, lifelong learning and career needs.

     5.  For the area of the appropriate use of technology, understand human, cultural and societal issues relating to technology and practice legal and ethical behaviors when using technology, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Articulate the concepts and issues concerning intellectual and digital property rights;

     (b) Compare the similarities and differences between the acceptable use of technological resources at school and in the work environment;

     (c) Extrapolate how technology will affect the ability of the pupil to collaborate, learn and produce in postsecondary education and in a career;

     (d) Analyze the capabilities and limitations of current and emerging technologies and assess the potential of those technologies to address personal, societal, lifelong learning and career needs; and

     (e) Model appropriate behaviors in the use of technology while leading a group of pupils through a collaborative project using current and emerging technologies.

     6.  For the areas of technological operations and concepts, demonstrate an understanding of technological concepts, systems and operations, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

     (a) Describe the components of technological systems and how those components interact;

     (b) Critique the selection of digital tools based on the efficiency and effectiveness of those tools;

     (c) Analyze and troubleshoot common hardware and software issues to optimize learning and productivity; and

     (d) Analyze the capabilities and limitations of current and emerging technologies based on the potential of those technologies to address personal learning, career needs and societal issues.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R038-00, 6-20-2000, eff. 7-1-2000; A by R008-10, 6-30-2010)

     NAC 389.511  Social studies. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  By the beginning of high school, pupils must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades for social studies offered in public schools. Instruction in high school in social studies must be designed so that pupils meet the following performance standards by the completion of high school:

     1.  For the area of social study skills:

     (a) Acquire and apply skills of reading, writing and oral communication to construct knowledge, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Read text using reading strategies, including, without limitation, strategies that employ prior knowledge, use key vocabulary words and employ context clues.

          (2) Read text for a specific purpose, including, without limitation, to identify cause and effect relationships, to compare and contrast information, to identify fact and opinion and to identify author bias.

          (3) Respond to historical texts and other social studies literature by inferring, drawing conclusions, making predictions and formulating questions pertaining to history, geography, economics and civics.

          (4) Process or synthesize information by writing, taking notes, using graphic organizers, summarizing, sequencing events or formulating thesis statements, or any combination thereof.

     (b) Acquire, organize, use and evaluate information that prepares a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Formulate appropriate research questions.

          (2) Conduct research by gathering, organizing and evaluating the credibility and bias of information from a variety of online, print and nonprint resources.

          (3) Process, effectively communicate and present information orally, in writing and by developing websites, using multimedia presentations and using other forms of technology.

          (4) Critically analyze messages in the media to identify propaganda, censorship and bias.

          (5) Create, interpret, analyze and detect bias in maps, graphs, charts and diagrams.

          (6) Demonstrate and advocate legal and ethical behaviors regarding the use of technology among peers, family and the community.

          (7) Collaborate with peers, experts and other persons to contribute to a knowledge base with a specific content, including, without limitation, contributing to weblogs, podcasts and other types of digital media or websites, to compile, synthesize, produce and disseminate information.

     (c) Demonstrate historical comprehension by analyzing and interpreting historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts and interpretations or perspectives on past events, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze patterns of historical continuity and change and to think chronologically.

          (2) Analyze and evaluate primary and secondary resources for perspectives of historical events.

          (3) Differentiate between historical memory and historical fact.

          (4) Apply social studies to situations involving actual events that are currently taking place.

          (5) Extract significant ideas from social studies resources and frame questions pertaining to history.

          (6) Use primary and secondary resources to analyze and interpret history.

          (7) Compare multiple perspectives of historical events using a variety of resources.

          (8) Analyze and interpret primary resources to answer a historical question.

     (d) Demonstrate skills which prepare a pupil to be an active, informed and literate citizen, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate responsibility for the well-being of himself or herself, his or her family and the community in which he or she lives.

          (2) Discuss issues and events that have an impact on persons at local, state, national and global levels.

          (3) Actively participate in civics and community life at the local, state, national and global levels.

          (4) Seek information from a variety of sources and perspectives to develop informed opinions and creative solutions.

          (5) Ask meaningful questions and analyze and evaluate information and ideas.

          (6) Identify resources and perspectives that influence the formation of opinions and creative solutions.

          (7) Use effective decision-making and problem-solving skills in public and private life.

          (8) Collaborate effectively as a member of a group.

     2.  For the area of history:

     (a) Understand the development, characteristics and interaction of persons, cultures, societies, religions and ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Assess the impact of the Industrial Revolution on race, class and gender.

          (2) Discuss the influences of American industrialists on the rise of corporate capitalism.

          (3) Assess the impact of technological innovations and urbanization on the social and economic development of society.

          (4) Define the term “nativism” and explain the political and social responses to immigration into the United States.

          (5) Identify the causes of labor movements in the United States and analyze the consequences of those movements.

          (6) Explain how social movements of the 20th century led to the emergence of a pluralistic society.

          (7) Evaluate how cultural developments in the arts, literature, architecture, education, media and leisure activities reflected and changed society.

          (8) Discuss the effects of early technologies on society, including, without limitation, communication, transportation and manufacturing technologies.

          (9) Explain how trade causes cultural diffusion.

          (10) Compare and contrast the characteristics of dominant world cultures.

          (11) Analyze how and why Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism acquired new adherents in various parts of the world.

          (12) Examine the impact of scientific, technological, mathematical, cultural and artistic developments of the Renaissance on societies around the world.

          (13) Explain the causes of the Reformation and the effects the Reformation had on Europe and the Americas.

          (14) Identify the influence of the Enlightenment on the Western World, including, without limitation, the influence on philosophy, science, fine arts, government and literature.

          (15) Analyze the cultural, social and economic changes that occurred as a result of industrialization.

          (16) Analyze how industrialization, migration, changing diets and advances in science and medicine have affected demographics across the world.

     (b) Understand the influences of persons, events, ideas and conflicts in the development of nations, empires, cultures and political and economic ideas, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Summarize the concepts and results of the American Revolution and post-revolutionary outcomes as they apply to the 20th century.

          (2) Summarize the concepts and results of the Civil War and Reconstruction as they apply to the 20th century.

          (3) Analyze how different cultures, points of view and self-interests influence compromise and conflict over territories, borders and resources.

          (4) Describe the final settlement of the American West and the federal policies toward Native Americans, including, without limitation, the Dawes Act, the Plains Wars and the reservation system.

          (5) Assess the contributions of immigrant groups to the development of the United States.

          (6) Define the term “imperialism” and discuss the impact of imperialism on the political relations of the United States with other nations.

          (7) Discuss the causes and consequences of expansion policies and diplomatic policies of the United States.

          (8) Discuss the economic and political effects of World War I on the United States.

          (9) Describe the causes and consequences of the Great Depression.

          (10) Analyze the policies and programs of the New Deal and the effects those policies and programs had on political, economic and diplomatic institutions.

          (11) Describe the cultural, economic, political and technological impact of World War II on the United States.

          (12) Describe the causes and effects of the change in demographics and the development of suburbanization in the United States.

          (13) Explain the effects of Cold War policies on the involvement of the United States in the Korean War and the Vietnam War.

          (14) Examine the changes in political culture of the United States during the 1960s and 1970s, including, without limitation, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Watergate scandal and the Iranian hostage crisis.

          (15) Explain the economic, political and technological impact on the United States of the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf War, the Iraq War and the War on Terrorism.

          (16) Examine the roles of nationalism, imperialism and religion in the building and development of nations.

          (17) Describe the rise of commercial trading centers and their effects on social, political and economic institutions around the world.

          (18) Explain the development of monarchies and the effect those monarchies had on centralized government, commerce, trade and religion.

          (19) Explain how Greek and Roman civilizations influenced the development of democratic and republican governments in modern societies.

          (20) Analyze the development of the nation-state and explain how nation-states are different from empires and other forms of political organizations.

          (21) Explain why and how shifts in global power happened after World War I and World War II.

          (22) Explain how the dissolution of the Soviet Union and other Eastern European communist governments resulted in the formation of new nations.

          (23) Explain the objectives of a variety of independence movements and analyze political factors that contributed to changes in nations.

          (24) Discuss examples of contemporary ethnic conflicts and explain how those conflicts changed nations.

          (25) Discuss major reasons for tensions and conflicts in the contemporary world and efforts that have been made to address those tensions and conflicts.

     (c) Understand the influences of social ideas and personal action on social, political, economic and technological change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe important persons in the movement to expand rights of African Americans and explain their struggle to expand those rights during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

          (2) Describe the rise of corporations and analyze working conditions in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

          (3) Analyze the contributions of inventors and innovators that led to a change in society.

          (4) Determine the causes and effects of the Populist and Progressive Movements.

          (5) Analyze major social movements in the United States and explain the impact those movements had on changing social and political culture.

          (6) Examine social tensions in the post-World War I era, including, without limitation, radical politics, restrictions on immigration, internal migration, religious fundamentalism and racism.

          (7) Describe the development of the Women’s Suffrage Movement and the subsequent passage of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution.

          (8) Explain how the social and economic opportunities of the post-World War II era contributed to social responsibility and change.

          (9) Identify and describe the major issues, events and persons of minority rights movements, including, without limitation, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Black Power Movement, the United Farm Workers, the American Indian Movement, Viva La Raza and the Women’s Rights Movement.

          (10) Analyze how post-World War II science and technology augmented the economic strength of the United States, transformed the daily lives of persons and influenced the world economy and politics.

          (11) Compare and contrast the social impact on the United States of the Cold War and the War on Terrorism.

          (12) Analyze major events reported by the media and the impact of those events at the local, state, national and global levels.

          (13) Compare and contrast racial segregation in the United States with racial and social policies of other nations, including, without limitation, apartheid in the Republic of South Africa.

          (14) Explain the impact of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism on political and social structures around the world.

          (15) Analyze the responses of persons to restrictive social and political systems.

          (16) Analyze how the ideals and institutions of freedom, equality, justice and citizenship have changed.

          (17) Evaluate the worldwide implications of advancements in nuclear, electronic, computer and medical technologies.

          (18) Explain how literature, music and art are used by persons to voice their opposition to or support for a cause and encourage social change.

          (19) Determine the causes and consequences of genocidal conflicts, including, without limitation, the Holocaust and the conflicts in Armenia, Bosnia, Darfur and Rwanda.

          (20) Analyze the causes, consequences and moral implications of ethnic conflicts around the world.

          (21) Explain the changing role of race, class and gender.

          (22) Explain how literature, music, the media and visual arts affect social change.

          (23) Examine the ideals and institutions of freedom, equality, justice and citizenship and explain how they have changed.

          (24) Understand how border disputes among nations reflect and influence the conceptions and identities of societies.

     (d) Understand the interactions and interdependence among nations around the world and the impact of economics, politics, religions and cultures on international relationships, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe and interpret the causes and effects of World War I and World War II on the relationship between the United States and Europe.

          (2) Discuss key persons, ideas and events of the Cold War era and analyze their impact on economic and political policies in the United States.

          (3) Analyze how international policies contributed to the end of the Cold War.

          (4) Identify and analyze trends in domestic and foreign affairs of the United States from the end of the Vietnam War to September 11, 2001.

          (5) Discuss the impacts of conflicts on the United States economic, political and social position in the world, including, without limitation, the impact of the Korean War, Vietnam War, Persian Gulf War, Iraq War and War on Terrorism.

          (6) Analyze how major sources of tension or conflict influence the current political climate in the United States, including, without limitation, September 11, 2001, the Patriot Act and security issues.

          (7) Describe the strategic, political and economic policies of the United States concerning the Middle East, Latin America, Mexico, immigration, trade and the environment.

          (8) Explore the influence of popular culture in the United States on other nations and the influence of popular culture in other nations on the United States.

          (9) Evaluate the influence of the cultural ideas of the United States on other nations.

          (10) Explore the influence of various cultures from around the world on the United States.

          (11) Explain the impact of imperialism and colonial rule on persons in Africa, Asia and South America and the independence movements that resulted from imperialism and colonial rule in those areas.

          (12) Describe the causes and effects of the Russian Revolution, including, without limitation, Marxism, Leninism and Bolshevism.

          (13) Discuss the causes, characteristics and consequences of European and Japanese imperialism before World War II.

          (14) Analyze the causes, courses and effects of World War I and World War II.

          (15) Describe the significance of the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the influence of international and economic factors that contributed to the end of the Cold War.

          (16) Examine the decline of colonial rule and the development of independent nations.

          (17) Describe the rise of totalitarian societies in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

          (18) Explain the impact of world commerce on the relationships between developed nations and developing nations.

          (19) Describe the contributions of the social, political and economic characteristics of modern civilizations in Latin America, Africa, China, India and Japan.

          (20) Describe tensions in contemporary Islamic countries concerning the reconciliation of traditional and Western influences.

          (21) Analyze the political and religious factors that contribute to instability in the Middle East.

          (22) Describe how political and economic alliances affect persons and countries.

          (23) Describe how global issues, including, without limitation, human rights, the environment, regional conflicts and health issues, affect nations.

          (24) Analyze how the contemporary political climate has changed personal and national security within and among nations.

     3.  For the area of geography:

     (a) Use maps, globes and other geographic tools and technologies to locate and extrapolate information about persons, places and environments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use map elements, including, without limitation, scale, to identify and locate physical and human features in the United States and the world.

          (2) Analyze and interpret geographic information by selecting appropriate maps, map projections and other representations, including, without limitation, urban planning and national parks.

          (3) Apply concepts and models of spatial organization and use quantitative methods to identify and make decisions about geographic information.

          (4) Analyze a variety of complex maps, including, without limitation, topographic, demographic and land use maps, to acquire geographic information.

          (5) Construct complex, accurate maps and models from memory to answer questions about locations of human and physical features.

          (6) Analyze maps for purpose, accuracy, content and design.

          (7) Analyze and interpret physical and human features on Earth using appropriate geographic tools and technologies.

          (8) Select and design maps, graphs, diagrams, tables or charts to organize geographic information using a variety of technologies.

     (b) Understand the physical and human features of places, and use that information to define and study regions and their patterns of changes, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Determine how relationships between humans and the environment lead to the development of connections among places and regions.

          (2) Explain why characteristics of places change.

          (3) Apply the concept of region to organize and study a geographic issue.

          (4) Analyze selected historical issues, demographics and questions using the geographic concept of regions.

          (5) Explain why places and regions are important to cultural identity and serve as forces for both unification and fragmentation.

          (6) Compare characteristics of places and regions from different perspectives.

          (7) Determine how tools affect the way cultural groups perceive and use resources within places and regions.

          (8) Use absolute and relative location, including, without limitation, longitude and latitude, to locate prominent countries, cities and physical features in different regions of the world.

     (c) Understand how economic, political and cultural processes interact to shape patterns of human migration and settlement, influence and interdependence, and conflict and cooperation, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze demographic trends in the world.

          (2) Evaluate the impact of migration and settlement on physical and human systems.  

          (3) Analyze the development of civilizations and the impact that development has on the changes and progress of human development.

          (4) Compare characteristics and patterns of rural and urban migration and settlement in developed and developing countries.

          (5) Evaluate why major cities develop in particular geographic locations and how their development affects cultures.

          (6) Analyze and evaluate international economic issues from a spatial perspective.

          (7) Analyze how location and distance connect to influence economic systems at local, national and international levels.

          (8) Evaluate changes in the size and structure of cultural, political and economic organizations.

     (d) Understand the effects of interactions between human and physical systems, and changes in the use, distribution and importance of resources, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze how changes in the physical environment can increase or diminish the capacity of the environment to support human activity.

          (2) Describe ways in which technology has affected the human capacity to modify the physical environment, and evaluate the possible regional or global impact of the technology.

          (3) Develop possible responses to changes caused by human modification of the physical environment.

          (4) Analyze human perception of and response to natural hazards, including, without limitation, use, distribution and importance of resources.

          (5) Analyze the patterns of use, the changing distribution and the relative importance of the resources of the earth.

          (6) Develop policies for the use and management of the resources of the earth that consider the various interests involved.

     4.  For the area of economics:

     (a) Understand how scarcity and incentives affect choices, how markets work, why markets form, how supply and demand interact to determine the market price and how changes in prices act as economic signals to coordinate trade, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Analyze choices and incentive systems used by parents, teachers, employers and governments using the concepts of total benefits and opportunity costs, using the concepts of the impact of marginal costs and marginal benefits and evaluating effectiveness.

          (2) Analyze how consumers adjust their purchases in response to changes in price using the concept of price elasticity.

          (3) Assess how producers can adjust their sales decisions in response to changes in price using the concept of price elasticity.

          (4) Evaluate career paths taking into consideration the specific skills required for a career, the wages that may be earned in a career, the impact of the skills of a person on the wages he or she can earn and the response of wages to market demand.

          (5) Analyze markets using the concepts of supply and demand, including, without limitation, the impact of changes in supply on prices, the impact of changes in demand on prices and the impact of price controls.

     (b) Identify indicators used to measure economic performance, understand important aspects of how the economy acts as a system, and understand the roles of money, interest rates, saving and borrowing, financial institutions and the central banking system in the economy, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe the current money supply measures of the United States, including, without limitation, M1 and M2.

          (2) Explain the three functions of money, including, without limitation, the medium of exchange, the store of value and the unit of account.

          (3) Explain why a real interest rate accurately measures the benefit of saving or the cost of borrowing, and indicate ways a high interest rate could be detrimental or beneficial.

          (4) Explain what a credit rating is and how it affects the ability to access loans.

          (5) Compare the risks and rewards of using the services offered by different financial institutions.

          (6) Explain how the circular flow of economic activity can affect the income of the United States.

          (7) Analyze the potential production of goods and services for a nation as determined by the resources and technology of the nation.

          (8) Explain how the Federal Reserve influences bank loans, the inflation rate of the economy and economic activity in general using the reserve requirement, the discount rate and open market operations.

          (9) Explain how government fiscal policy may affect the rate of unemployment by influencing production, employment and price levels.

          (10) Describe how standards of living in the United States have changed over time using real gross domestic product per capita as a measure of the standard of living.

          (11) Define the term “recession” and examine the economy of the United States over time using the change in real gross domestic product.

          (12) Discuss the effects of inflation on the economy of the United States using the consumer price index.

          (13) Compare the unemployment rates for groups of persons who differ by age, gender, ethnicity, occupation and education.

          (14) Demonstrate knowledge of when, why and how interest rate levels have experienced relative highs and relative lows throughout the history of the United States.

          (15) Explain how interest rates are determined using supply and demand.

     (c) Identify the causes of economic change and explain how the economic system of the United States responds to those changes and how other economic systems respond to change, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Identify the roles of organizations in a market economy, including, without limitation, for-profit organizations, not-for-profit organizations and labor unions.

          (2) Analyze the past, present and future role of investment in enhancing economic growth and raising the standard of living.

          (3) Evaluate how entrepreneurs affect the economy by solving problems, taking risks and taking advantage of opportunities to earn profits.

          (4) Judge the advantages and disadvantages of specialization and interdependence.

          (5) Explain how self-interest, channeled through the marketplace, can increase the overall standard of living.

          (6) Analyze the role of government in a market economy regarding public goods, externalities, monopoly power, redistribution of income and the definition and protection of property rights.

          (7) Describe the rise of national economies, the emergence of free markets and the emergence of democratic capitalism.

          (8) Illustrate the idea that real world economies tend to be mixed economies containing elements of capitalism, socialism, command allocations of resources and market allocations of resources.

          (9) Compare the benefits and costs of allocating resources through the markets or the government.

          (10) Discuss how the pricing system of an economy determines what goods and services will be produced, how they will be produced and who will receive them.

     (d) Explore trends in international trade, the impact of trade on the economy of the United States and the role of exchange rates, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Describe how the economic characteristics of other countries and their economic events affect the United States.

          (2) Determine how a change in exchange rates affects the ability of residents of a country to consume products from other countries.

          (3) Assess the impact of globalization on the economy of the United States and the world economy.

          (4) Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of international trade by comparing free trade and restricted trade.

     5.  For the area of civics:

     (a) Know why society needs rules, law and governments, and understand the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain the concept of the rule of law in the establishment of the United States Constitution.

          (2) Analyze major social, political and economic conflicts and evaluate the role of compromise in the resolution of those conflicts.

          (3) Describe the influences of historic ideas on the creation of early documents of the United States, including, without limitation, the influence of Greek law, the Magna Carta, the Iroquois Confederacy, the social contract theory, natural rights philosophy and republicanism.

          (4) Describe how the Nevada Constitution and the United States Constitution preserve state and national principles and serve as methods for change, including, without limitation, the formal and informal processes for amending a constitution.

          (5) Analyze the provisions of the United States Constitution and the amendments to the United States Constitution which protect personal rights, including, without limitation, the Due Process Clause and Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment and through the examination of landmark cases, including, without limitation:

               (I) Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka;

               (II) Gideon v. Wainwright;

               (III) Miranda v. Arizona; and

               (IV) Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District.

          (6) Examine the rights of citizens and how those rights are protected and restricted.

          (7) Analyze and evaluate the role of citizen participation in civic life.

          (8) Examine the responsibilities of local, state and national citizenship.

          (9) Interpret the symbols and documents of a nation and analyze how the documents represent the identity of the nation.

     (b) Understand the United States Constitution and the government created by the United States Constitution, including, without limitation, the relationship between national and sub-national governments, and the structure and function of state and local governments, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain the provisions of the United States Constitution regarding the division of powers between the Federal Government and state governments, including, without limitation, powers that are delegated, implied, reserved and concurrent.

          (2) Analyze and give examples of the expansion of the Federal Government through the use of its enumerated and implied powers.

          (3) Provide contemporary examples of federalism.

          (4) Compare and contrast the structure of the Nevada Constitution and the United States Constitution.

          (5) Use examples to illustrate the Supremacy Clause in defining the relationship between state governments and the Federal Government.

          (6) Describe the unique role of tribal and territorial governments in the United States.

          (7) Examine the organization of the United States Constitution and describe the structure it creates, including, without limitation, the Executive, Legislative and Judicial Branches.

          (8) Examine the organization of the Nevada Constitution and describe the structure it creates, including, without limitation, the Executive, Legislative and Judicial Branches.

          (9) Explain the structure and function of local governments.

          (10) Analyze the effectiveness of checks and balances in maintaining the equal division of power.

          (11) Describe the creation of laws through the legislative process.

          (12) Describe the duties of the Executive Branch, including, without limitation, the duties of the Cabinet and departments of the Executive Branch, regulatory agencies, the Executive Office of the President of the United States and the staff of the White House.

          (13) Describe the structure and jurisdiction of the federal court system and analyze the power of judicial review.

          (14) Explain the state and local judicial processes, including, without limitation, juvenile, civil and criminal court systems.

     (c) Describe the roles of political parties, elections, interest groups, the media and public opinion in the democratic process, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Assess the process by which leaders are selected in the political system in the United States, and analyze the role of the electoral college in the election of the President of the United States.

          (2) Analyze the roles and functions of political parties in public policy and the electoral process.

          (3) Evaluate the significance of interest groups and public opinion in the political process of a democratic society.

          (4) Analyze the role of the media in the process of political persuasion.

          (5) Evaluate propaganda in the political process.

          (6) Describe the process by which public policy is formed and implemented.

     (d) Explain the different political systems in the world and how those systems relate to the United States and the citizens of the United States, as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Summarize and evaluate the significant characteristics of the major political systems of the world, including, without limitation, monarchies, totalitarian dictatorships, presidential systems, parliamentary systems, socialism and communism.

          (2) Analyze the conflict between the policies of the United States regarding isolation and intervention in world affairs.

          (3) Identify and analyze the foreign policy of the United States with regard to dealing with international problems, including, without limitation, diplomacy, economic policy, humanitarian aid and military intervention.

          (4) Critique the role of international organizations, including, without limitation, the United Nations, the World Bank, Amnesty International and the International Red Cross.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R074-00, eff. 6-20-2000; A by R011-09, 10-27-2009)

Elective Courses of Study

     NAC 389.516  Permissible elective courses of study. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360, 389.0185)  A local school board may offer the following courses of study as elective courses in a public high school:

     1.  Social studies, other than the course of study required by NAC 389.511.

     2.  The arts.

     3.  Business math.

     4.  Employability skills.

     5.  Communications, which may include the courses of study described in NAC 389.556 and 389.558.

     6.  Career and technical education, in cooperation with private employers, as described in NAC 389.562, 389.564 and 389.566.

     7.  Drivers’ education.

     8.  World language.

     9.  Skills needed to obtain employment as described in NAC 389.644 to 389.650, inclusive.

     10.  Introduction to keyboarding.

     11.  Great Basin Native American languages.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92; A by R066-97, 12-10-97; R073-00, 6-20-2000; R155-01, 12-17-2001; R195-01, 4-1-2002; R010-03, 10-30-2003; R108-03, R165-03, R166-03, R184-03 & R185-03, 1-22-2004; R236-03, 3-19-2004; R040-05 & R043-05, 10-31-2005; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; A by Bd. of Education by R011-09, 10-27-2009; R132-10, 12-16-2010; R087-12, 11-1-2012; R063-14, 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.541  The arts. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185, 389.520)  Pupils in the 9th, 10th, 11th or 12th grade who elect to take a class in the arts must know and be able to do everything required in the previous grades of public school for the elected course of study in the arts. Instruction in the arts in the 9th, 10th, 11th or 12th grades must be designed so that pupils meet the following standards of performance by the completion of the 12th grade:

     1.  For the area of music:

     (a) Sing a varied repertoire of music alone and with others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Sing his or her repertoire in small and large ensembles using expression, technical accuracy, good breath control, intonation, diction and articulation, and tone and timbre quality while maintaining his or her part; and

          (2) Sing in four parts with and without accompaniment.

     (b) Perform a varied repertoire of music on instruments alone and with others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Perform a large and varied repertoire with expression, technical accuracy and appropriate ensemble skills, with a level of musical difficulty of 4 and in small and large ensembles while following a conductor; and

          (2) Perform contrapuntal music with accuracy of rhythm and melody and with appropriate balance.

     (c) Improvise melodies, variations and accompaniments as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to improvise:

          (1) Melodies over a simple chord progression;

          (2) Harmonies that are appropriate for the pupil; and

          (3) Variations of melody and rhythm on pentatonic melodies and melodies in major keys that are provided by the teacher.

     (d) Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compose music in more than two distinct styles incorporating the elements of music; and

          (2) Arrange a piece of music for voices or instruments incorporating correct transposition and appropriate vocal and instrumental ranges.

     (e) Read and notate music as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Read complex rhythms in all meters within the context of the repertoire with a level of musical difficulty of 4;

          (2) Read complex melodies within the context of the repertoire with a level of musical difficulty of 4;

          (3) Apply all standard musical symbols within the context of the repertoire with a level of musical difficulty of 4;

          (4) Sight-read music with technical accuracy and with a level of musical difficulty of 3; and

          (5) Use nonstandard notation symbols.

     (f) Listen to, analyze and describe music as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Apply knowledge of the technical vocabulary of the elements of music in analyzing aural examples; and

          (2) Analyze examples of a varied repertoire of music representing diverse genres and cultures by describing the uses of the elements of music and expression.

     (g) Evaluate music and musical performances as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Develop specific musical criteria for making informed critical evaluations of the quality and effectiveness of performances and compositions;

          (2) Evaluate the pupil’s personal participation in musical performances and compositions applying specific criteria for music and justify his or her opinion; and

          (3) Evaluate performances or compositions by comparing them to similar or exemplary models and justify his or her opinion by describing several of the most distinguishing features of each performance or composition using appropriate terminology relating to music.

     (h) Demonstrate relationships between music, the other arts and disciplines outside the arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare similar themes found in music and other art forms and analyze how themes are expressed in each; and

          (2) Analyze concepts that are common to music and other disciplines outside the arts.

     (i) Demonstrate knowledge of the historical periods and cultural diversity of music, including, the ability to:

          (1) Classify musical examples by style, historical periods and cultures; and

          (2) Discuss the achievements of musicians from various historical periods and cultures.

     2.  For the area of theater:

     (a) Understand the components of theatrical production, including scriptwriting, directing and production as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Use historical or cultural research to write a script which is well-structured and properly formatted and which is appropriate for stage, television, film or electronic media;

          (2) Create a theatrical performance that includes, without limitation, auditions, casting characters, directing scenes and organizing and facilitating production meetings;

          (3) Explain the varied responsibilities of technical personnel involved in theater, film, television or electronic media;

          (4) Develop a unified production concept for informal theater, film, television or electronic media;

          (5) Design and create for a theatrical, film, television or electronic media production a program, poster and one of the following:

               (I) Tickets;

               (II) Flyers;

               (III) Print Ads;

               (IV) Print media; or

               (V) Television or radio public service announcements;

          (6) Design or construct with other group members a variety of devices that are used for scenery in an informal production for theater, film, television or electronic media;

          (7) Explain the pupil’s choice of costumes, props and makeup as they relate to the interpretation of an informal production for theater, film, television or electronic media;

          (8) Describe different light and sound equipment and techniques in theater, film, television and electronic media and demonstrate a practical application of such equipment and techniques in one area; and

          (9) Create or implement a functional light or sound plot for an informal production for theater, film, television or electronic media.

     (b) Understand and demonstrate the role of the actor in the theater as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain and practice various classical and contemporary techniques and methods of acting;

          (2) Interpret and explain the physical, emotional and social dimensions of characters found in a variety of text; and

          (3) Portray characters within an ensemble for theater, film, television and electronic media in an informal production.

     (c) Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in theater, film, television and electronic media as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Generate and justify personal aesthetic criteria and use that criteria to critique the effectiveness of the visual, aural and kinesthetic elements of a performance; and

          (2) Compare and contrast one of the following in various media:

               (I) Classical and contemporary dramas; or

               (II) Classical and contemporary comedies.

     (d) Recognize and explain how theatrical experiences contribute to a better understanding of history, culture and human relationships as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Show similarities and differences in the way themes and archetypes are portrayed in dramatized events in another culture and historical period; and

          (2) Evaluate the ways that characters in dramatized events resolve conflict and cite some alternative means for resolving such conflict.

     (e) Make connections between theater and other academic disciplines as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Compare and contrast the ways that themes, stories or motifs are interpreted in works from the three different areas of the arts;

          (2) Identify and explain three significant events in the development of dramatic forum, production practices and theatrical traditions across cultures and historical periods; and

          (3) Describe and assess three different ways technology enhances theater, film, television and electronic media.

     3.  For the area of visual arts:

     (a) Know and apply media, techniques and processes for developing visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain why he or she chose a particular medium, technique and process in his or her works of visual art;

          (2) Revise the pupil’s works of visual art based on criteria established by the teacher; and

          (3) Create works of visual art that reveal control over a variety of media, tools, techniques and processes.

     (b) Use knowledge of characteristics, purposes and functions of the visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Explain in a logical manner an interpretation of visual characteristics of works of visual art;

          (2) Explain in a logical manner an interpretation of the purposes of works of visual art;

          (3) Analyze at a basic level the effectiveness of, and relationships among, visual characteristics, purposes and functions in works of visual art; and

          (4) Demonstrate control of visual characteristics of visual art to convey ideas in a series of the pupil’s works of visual art.

     (c) Choose, apply and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas relating to the visual arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Evaluate and summarize the origins of subject matter, symbols and ideas in works of visual art;

          (2) Plan and create an original work of visual art using subject matter, symbols and ideas to communicate an intended meaning; and

          (3) Justify the subject matter, symbols and ideas used in works of visual art.

     (d) Understand the visual arts in relation to history and culture as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Interpret works of visual art of various cultures and eras while differentiating among relationships of form, context and purposes in such works;

          (2) Analyze at a basic level similarities in works of visual art from various times and cultures while interpreting the meanings of such works; and

          (3) Analyze at a basic level relationships between works of visual art of the pupil and influences on such works from the history, aesthetics and culture of the pupil.

     (e) Analyze and assess characteristics, merits and meaning in the pupil’s own works of visual art and in the works of others as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Evaluate his or her works of visual art and the works of visual art of others based on themes, styles, purposes and subject matter;

          (2) With guidance from the teacher, create criteria and use such criteria to assess merits of a work of visual art;

          (3) Study and evaluate a variety of techniques for communicating meanings, ideas, attitudes, views and intentions through works of visual art; and

          (4) Develop a personal aesthetic position and explain its level of success when applied to a work of visual art.

     (f) Demonstrate relationships between the visual arts, the other arts and disciplines outside the arts as demonstrated by the ability of the pupil to:

          (1) Demonstrate how ideas, issues and themes of a particular period are used in the visual arts and other disciplines;

          (2) Compare the use of materials, techniques, media and processes of the visual arts with those of other art disciplines; and

          (3) Create works of visual art that reflect the research of multiple disciplines.

     4.  As used in this section:

     (a) “Aesthetic criteria” means criteria developed by a pupil about the visual, aural and oral aspects of a performance that are derived from cultural and emotional values and cognitive meaning.

     (b) “Aesthetics” means the philosophical study of the visual arts, focusing on broad questions on the nature of art in general rather than the study of specific works of art.

     (c) “Unified production concept” means a brief statement, metaphor or expression of the essential meaning of a play that orders and patterns all the parts of the play.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R073-00, eff. 6-20-2000)

     NAC 389.551  Business math. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A course of study in business math must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to do the following:

     1.  Demonstrate an understanding of basic mathematical foundations.

     2.  Solve problems involving whole numbers, decimals, fractions, percents, ratios, averages and proportions.

     3.  Use algebraic operations to solve problems.

     4.  Use common international standards of measurement in solving problems.

     5.  Analyze and interpret data using common statistical procedures.

     6.  Use mathematical procedures to analyze and solve business problems.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R108-03, eff. 1-22-2004)

     NAC 389.555  Employability skills for career readiness. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185)  A course of study in employability skills for career readiness must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to do the following:

     1.  For the area of personal qualities and skills, demonstrate:

     (a) A positive work ethic by coming to work on time each workday, being willing to follow directions and being motivated to accomplish each task.

     (b) Integrity, honesty and reliability by abiding by applicable laws and workplace policies.

     (c) Skills necessary for teamwork by contributing to the success of the workplace team, assisting coworkers and requesting help when needed.

     (d) Positive self-representation by dressing appropriately for the workplace and using language and manners suitable for the workplace.

     (e) Awareness of diversity in the workplace by working professionally with all customers and coworkers.

     (f) Skills necessary for conflict resolution by negotiating diplomatic solutions to interpersonal and workplace issues.

     (g) Creativity and resourcefulness by contributing new ideas to the workplace and working with initiative.

     2.  For the area of professional knowledge and skills, demonstrate:

     (a) Effective speaking and listening skills by communicating effectively with customers and coworkers and by following directions.

     (b) Effective reading and writing skills by reading and interpreting workplace documents and writing clearly.

     (c) Skills of critical thinking and problem solving by analyzing and resolving problems that occur in the performance of assigned workplace tasks.

     (d) Healthy behaviors and safety skills by managing personal health and following workplace safety guidelines.

     (e) Understanding of workplace organizations, systems and climates by identifying overall workplace issues and fulfilling the mission of the workplace.

     (f) Lifelong learning skills by continually acquiring new information related to the industry and improving professional skills.

     (g) Skills necessary for the acquisition of a job and advancement in a job by preparing to apply for a job and seeking promotion in the job.

     (h) Skills necessary for the management of time, tasks and resources by organizing and implementing a productive plan of work.

     (i) Skills of mathematics necessary for the workplace by using mathematical reasoning to accomplish tasks in the workplace.

     (j) Skills of customer service by identifying and addressing the needs of all customers and providing service in a helpful, courteous and knowledgeable manner.

     3.  For the area of technological knowledge and skills, demonstrate:

     (a) Proficiency with technology that is specific to the job by selecting and safely using technological resources to accomplish workplace responsibilities in a productive manner.

     (b) Proficiency with information technology by effectively using computers, techniques for file management and computer software programs.

     (c) Proper and secure use of the Internet in a manner that is appropriate for the workplace.

     (d) Proficiency with telecommunications by selecting and using technological devices, services and applications appropriate for the workplace.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R108-03, eff. 1-22-2004; A by R001-12, 5-30-2012)

     NAC 389.556  Journalism. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A course of study in journalism must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to do the following:

     1.  Differentiate fact from opinion.

     2.  Identify elements which make facts newsworthy.

     3.  Distinguish which facts to use in writing news.

     4.  Write accurate, unbiased news stories based on given facts.

     5.  Demonstrate effective techniques of interviewing.

     6.  Practice different writing styles for sports, features, editorials, columns and reviews.

     7.  Read copy and proofread.

     8.  Write a headline and lay out a publication.

     9.  Recognize the importance of photojournalism, including composition, cropping and sizing of photographs.

     10.  Recognize the importance of advertising.

     11.  Differentiate between journalism involving printing and broadcasting.

     12.  Write scripts for programs of news and features for radio and television.

     13.  Identify the basic concepts of the law relating to journalism, including libel, privileged information and invasion of privacy.

     14.  Recognize the role and responsibilities of the journalist in modern society.

     15.  Develop critical skills in assessing strengths and weaknesses in the professional journalist.

     16.  Identify opportunities for a career in journalism.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87)

     NAC 389.558  Speech. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A course of study in speech must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to do the following:

     1.  Demonstrate effective techniques of research by gathering and organizing material for speeches.

     2.  Practice techniques for writing a speech.

     3.  Apply the basic steps for organizing a speech.

     4.  Practice effective methods for delivery of a speech.

     5.  Use visual aids effectively.

     6.  Demonstrate poise, self-assurance and confidence while speaking.

     7.  Communicate feelings and ideas.

     8.  Demonstrate techniques of good listening.

     9.  Demonstrate techniques of oral interpretation.

     10.  Demonstrate leadership and poise by assuming the role of a leader of a group.

     11.  Understand social and political problems through communication.

     12.  Evaluate and judge presentations.

     13.  Recognize that speech is important in all careers.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87)

     NAC 389.562  Career and technical education in cooperation with private employer: Contents. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360)  A course of study in career and technical education in cooperation with a private employer must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to:

     1.  Acquire, in class, instruction that directly applies to the industry in which the pupil is employed.

     2.  Demonstrate a knowledge of the current technology used in the industry in which the pupil is employed.

     3.  Gain a practical knowledge of the industry the pupil is studying.

     4.  Demonstrate successful interaction with other workers, supervisors, clients and customers.

     5.  Demonstrate desirable habits and attitudes about work.

     6.  Apply the theory and technical skills learned in class while on the job.

     7.  Adapt to adverse working conditions.

     8.  Develop skills that relate to the basic concepts necessary for entry to, retention of and advancement on the job.

     9.  Keep the teacher informed about progress on the job.

     10.  Submit weekly time sheets.

     11.  Attend school and hold a job on a regular basis.

     12.  Give the employer and the teacher advance notice of inability to report for work or tardiness.

     13.  Describe entrepreneurship skills appropriate to owning or operating a business, or both.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87; A 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; R154-13, 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.564  Career and technical education in cooperation with private employer: Duties of teacher. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360)  A teacher of a course of study in career and technical education in cooperation with a private employer shall:

     1.  Provide relevant and current instruction which prepares the pupil for a specific vocation.

     2.  Provide realistic conditions which teach theory, technical skills, work scheduling and human relations.

     3.  Use training which correlates with the knowledge and skills expected by an employer.

     4.  Strengthen relations between the school and the community.

     5.  Supplement the facilities and resources in the school with those in the community that are representative of the availability of the industry being studied by the pupil.

     6.  Provide all parties with an awareness of their responsibilities and obligations while participating in the program.

     7.  Visit the place of employment to consult with pupils and employers to determine the pupil’s progress on the job, attitudes, growth of skills and knowledge and breadth of educational exposure.

     8.  Use discretion on the time and circumstances chosen for visits.

     9.  Assist the employer with appraisals of the pupil and the course of study.

     10.  Foster good communications and understanding between all parties.

     11.  Constantly strive to improve the program by seeking suggestions from all parties.

     12.  When supervising a pupil at a training location in which he or she does not hold an endorsement, use information from an appropriately endorsed teacher to ensure that the pupil functions satisfactorily during the training.

     13.  Recruit, interview and select pupils based on the career interests of the pupils and predetermined written criteria.

     14.  Keep records of the time used to develop training plans and agreements, counseling, training station assessment and student-employer evaluations.

     15.  Retain for at least 1 year after the pupil leaves the program the record of the pupil’s initial interview, the training agreement, the cooperative agreement, the employer-teacher-coordinator evaluation, the report of the pupil’s wages earned and hours worked during the program and his or her weekly time sheets.

     16.  Coordinate the pupil’s work experience with related classroom instruction.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87; A 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; R154-13, 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.566  Career and technical education in cooperation with private employer: Duties of employer. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360)  The employer of a pupil in a course of study in career and technical education in cooperation with a private employer shall:

     1.  Participate in the development of the agreement for training.

     2.  Assist the pupil to develop skills required in the industry.

     3.  Provide for direct supervision of the pupil’s work.

     4.  Give the pupil progressive and challenging work, review his or her progress each week and sign a weekly time sheet.

     5.  Provide periodic appraisals of the pupil’s performance on forms provided by the teacher.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; R154-13, 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.568  Drivers’ education. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.874, 389.090)

     1.  A pupil must complete 30 hours of classroom instruction to complete a course of drivers’ education. In completing the 30 hours of classroom instruction required by this subsection, 1 hour of behind-the-wheel training is equivalent to 3 hours of classroom instruction, as set forth in NRS 389.090. A school may provide a course of drivers’ education that includes more than the minimum number of hours of instruction required by this subsection.

     2.  A course of study in drivers’ education must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to do the following:

     (a) Describe the proper attitudes for driving safely and the adverse effects of disturbed emotions.

     (b) State the consequences of physical disabilities on the ability to drive.

     (c) Recognize the effects of alcohol and drugs on driving.

     (d) State the grounds for revocation of a driver’s license.

     (e) Explain the requirements for equipment and registration of a vehicle.

     (f) Identify the following:

          (1) The sign designating that parking is illegal;

          (2) The right-of-way in various situations;

          (3) Hand signals;

          (4) The meaning of the different colors of a traffic light;

          (5) When the driver of a school bus must stop; and

          (6) The legal and moral responsibilities in case of an accident.

     (g) Name the different highway systems and the organizations which supervise the maintenance of and enforce the traffic laws on each system.

     (h) Identify the purpose of each instrument, device and control in a vehicle.

     (i) List the procedures for preparing to start a vehicle.

     (j) Describe the weather and the condition of the road and how these affect driving.

     (k) Describe the proper procedures for making a turn.

     (l) Describe the proper procedures for parking.

     (m) Describe the proper procedures for moving in reverse.

     (n) Describe the proper procedures for driving in a controlled and an uncontrolled intersection.

     (o) Determine the proper distance for following.

     (p) Describe how to handle specified situations which arise when driving.

     (q) Differentiate between the techniques required for driving in the city, on the highway and under adverse conditions.

     (r) State the requirements for insurance in Nevada and the types of coverage available.

     (s) Compile a list for the efficient and economical maintenance of a vehicle.

     (t) Recognize the importance of the maintenance of a vehicle for driving safely.

     (u) Explain the procedures for purchasing an automobile.

     (v) Identify sources of credit to finance the purchase of an automobile.

     3.  A course of study in drivers’ education may be provided through classroom instruction or behind-the-wheel training, or both. A course of study in drivers’ education that is provided through a program of distance education pursuant to NRS 388.820 to 388.874, inclusive, must be equivalent to a course of study that is provided through regular classroom instruction.

     4.  As used in this section:

     (a) “Behind-the-wheel training” means the portion of a course of study of drivers’ education which is taught through the operation of a motor vehicle under real conditions and which is characterized by a pupil driving on a driving range or on the street, or both, while under the direction of a licensed teacher.

     (b) “Classroom instruction” means the portion of a course of study of drivers’ education that is taught in a classroom environment or through a program of distance education by a licensed teacher.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87; A by R107-01, 12-17-2001; R107-01, 12-17-2001, eff. 7-1-2002)

     NAC 389.571  American Sign Language: First year. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185)  A course of study in American Sign Language must include instruction designed to teach a pupil by completion of the first year:

     1.  Receptive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) The ability to comprehend simple statements and questions in standard dialect even if the pupil requires repetition for comprehension;

     (b) A general and detailed understanding of expressions that are short and discrete; and

     (c) The ability to comprehend the main idea of simple, extended messages and conversations.

     2.  Expressive skills, including, without limitation, the ability to express basic personal needs and to compose statements, questions and short messages, even if the pupil commits errors in grammar and in the production of signs, in a manner that is comprehensible to a person who is fluent in American Sign Language and who is experienced in communicating in American Sign Language with persons who are not fluent in American Sign Language.

     3.  Interactive skills, including, without limitation, the ability to initiate and engage in conversation with a person who is fluent in American Sign Language and who is experienced in communicating in American Sign Language with persons who are not fluent in American Sign Language, using simple statements and vocabulary and grammar appropriate to the situation. The pupil may have to repeat or rephrase his or her statements or questions so that the statements or questions are understood by persons who are fluent in American Sign Language and who are experienced in communicating with persons who are not fluent in American Sign Language.

     4.  Cultural skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) Knowledge of the existence of different cultures and a basic understanding of the culture of the community of persons who are deaf;

     (b) Knowledge of current events involving persons who are deaf and of persons who are deaf who are prominent in American society;

     (c) The ability to function in authentic, commonplace situations in the community of persons who are deaf even if the pupil makes errors that impede communication; and

     (d) Familiarity with the location of and directional signs within the geographical area of the school in which the class is taught.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R036-99, eff. 11-3-99)

     NAC 389.5712  American Sign Language: Second year. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185)  A course of study in American Sign Language must include instruction designed to teach a pupil by completion of the second year:

     1.  Receptive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) The ability to comprehend short conversations in standard dialects based on region, age and educational differences even if the pupil requires repetition or rephrasing for comprehension;

     (b) The ability to comprehend common grammatical features and use word order patterns in simple sentences;

     (c) A basic understanding of longer conversations and messages in familiar communicative situations; and

     (d) The ability to sustain comprehension through contextual inferences in short communications with persons who are fluent in American Sign Language and who are aware of the pupil’s lack of fluency.

     2.  Expressive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) The ability to use an intermediate vocabulary and commonly encountered structures of signs;

     (b) The ability to express comprehensively ideas relating to the past, present and future even if the pupil makes errors in expressing complex thoughts;

     (c) Basic development of sequential relationships; and

     (d) The ability to sign in a manner that is comprehensible to a person who is fluent in American Sign Language and who is experienced in communicating in American Sign Language with persons who are not fluent in American Sign Language.

     3.  Interactive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) The ability to initiate and sustain conversation even if the pupil exhibits frequent hesitation and requires paraphrasing for comprehension;

     (b) The ability to use more common grammatical features, even if the pupil commits errors in the formation and selection of the features;

     (c) The ability to use word order accurately in conversations and in more complex patterns;

     (d) The ability to sustain coherent structures of signs in short communication;

     (e) The ability to engage in extended communication that is cohesive; and

     (f) The ability to sign comprehensively even if the pupil has difficulty producing certain features in certain positions or combinations and may need to repeat or rephrase his or her statements or questions so that the statements or questions are understood by persons who are fluent in American Sign Language.

     4.  Cultural skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) Increased knowledge of different cultures and of the culture of the community of persons who are deaf even if the pupil demonstrates misunderstanding in the application of this knowledge;

     (b) An understanding that cultures, including, without limitation, the culture of the community of persons who are deaf, are a system of values that evolve over time;

     (c) The ability to show the manner in which certain values are associated with certain patterns of behavior in the culture of the pupil as well as in the culture of the community of persons who are deaf;

     (d) The ability to distinguish culturally authentic patterns of behavior from idiosyncratic behaviors;

     (e) Increased knowledge of current events involving persons who are deaf and of persons who are deaf who are prominent in American society; and

     (f) Increased familiarity with signs for geography within the geographical area of the school in which the class is taught.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R036-99, eff. 11-3-99)

     NAC 389.5714  American Sign Language: Third year. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185)  A course of study in American Sign Language must include instruction designed to teach a pupil by completion of the third year:

     1.  Receptive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) The ability to comprehend conversations of intermediate length in standard dialects based on region, age and educational differences;

     (b) An increased vocabulary;

     (c) The ability to use common grammatical features and word order patterns in sentences of intermediate length;

     (d) An advanced understanding of longer conversations and messages within familiar communicative situations; and

     (e) The ability to sustain comprehension through contextual inferences in short communications with persons who are fluent in American Sign Language.

     2.  Expressive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) Use of an advanced vocabulary and commonly encountered structures of signs;

     (b) Advanced proficiency in expressing comprehensively ideas relating to the past, present and future;

     (c) Improved ability to express more complex thoughts;

     (d) Continued development of sequential relationships; and

     (e) The ability to sign comprehensively with little difficulty and in a manner which is comprehensible to persons fluent in American Sign Language with less repetition.

     3.  Interactive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) Continued development in initiating and sustaining conversation;

     (b) Use of an expanded vocabulary, paraphrasing and more common grammatical features;

     (c) Use of word order in conversation accurately and in more complex patterns;

     (d) The ability to sustain coherent structures of signs in intermediate communications; and

     (e) The ability to demonstrate extended communication which is cohesive.

     4.  Cultural skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) Increased knowledge of different cultures and of the culture of the community of persons who are deaf and an advanced ability in applying such knowledge;

     (b) A more extensive understanding of cultures as systems of values that evolve over time;

     (c) The ability to demonstrate the manner in which certain values are associated with certain behavior patterns in the culture of the pupil as well as the culture of the community of persons who are deaf;

     (d) The ability to distinguish culturally authentic patterns of behavior from idiosyncratic behaviors;

     (e) Knowledge of current events involving persons who are deaf and of persons who are deaf who are prominent in American society;

     (f) Knowledge of historical events involving persons who are deaf;

     (g) Increased familiarity with directional signs within the geographical area in which the class is given; and

     (h) Familiarity with systems of signs derived from American Sign Language.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R036-99, eff. 11-3-99)

     NAC 389.5716  American Sign Language: Fourth year. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.0185)  A course of study in American Sign Language must include instruction designed to teach a pupil by completion of the fourth year:

     1.  Receptive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) The ability to comprehend a wide variety of registers with little or no repetition or paraphrasing necessary for comprehension;

     (b) The ability to comprehend most points of discussion or presentations on familiar topics; and

     (c) Continued development and mastery of advanced signed communication.

     2.  Expressive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) The ability to organize presentations on familiar topics;

     (b) The ability to organize complex ideas;

     (c) Use of an advanced vocabulary;

     (d) Advanced control of the morphology of the language and of most of the frequently used syntactic structures of signs; and

     (e) The ability to sign in a manner that is comprehensible to a person who is fluent in American Sign Language.

     3.  Interactive skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) The ability to communicate in most situations with confidence;

     (b) Continued development towards mastery of complicated or difficult material; and

     (c) Advanced control of more complex structures of signs.

     4.  Cultural skills, including, without limitation:

     (a) Knowledge of and the ability to function in the culture of the community of persons who are deaf;

     (b) An understanding of most behaviors particular to the community of persons who are deaf that are the product of the culture of the community of persons who are deaf;

     (c) An appreciation for the culture of the community of persons who are deaf;

     (d) The ability to function, communicate and generally avoid misunderstanding in authentic, everyday situations encountered in the community of persons who are deaf;

     (e) The ability to use the context to guess the meaning of unfamiliar behaviors that are particular to the culture of the community of persons who are deaf;

     (f) Demonstration of initiative and ease in using behaviors which are appropriate for use in the community of persons who are deaf and which are learned by observing authentic needs in the culture of the community of persons who are deaf;

     (g) Increased knowledge of current and historical events in the community of persons who are deaf and of persons who are deaf who are prominent in American society;

     (h) Increased familiarity with directional signs within the geographical area of the school in which the class is taught; and

     (i) Familiarity with systems of signs derived from American Sign Language.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R036-99, eff. 11-3-99)

     NAC 389.644  Skills to obtain employment: Contents. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A course of study in skills to obtain employment must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to do the following:

     1.  Apply a knowledge of skills needed to search for, acquire and retain employment.

     2.  Demonstrate positive habit and attitudes concerning work.

     3.  Understand opportunities in and the responsibilities of employment.

     4.  Exhibit the ability to adapt to change.

     5.  Work cooperatively.

     6.  Exhibit confidence and self-discipline.

     7.  Develop skills used in making decisions and establishing priorities.

     8.  Develop skills for effective speaking, listening, writing and reading.

     9.  Seek and accept responsibility.

     10.  Understand the American economic system, including the principles of free enterprise and entrepreneurship, taxes and the management of money.

     11.  Apply the instruction received in school that relates to the area of study.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87)

     NAC 389.646  Skills to obtain employment: Eligible pupils. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  The following pupils may enroll in a course of study in skills needed to obtain employment:

     1.  A pupil whose score is in the lower three stanines of a standardized achievement test or an equivalent test.

     2.  A pupil who is a dropout or potential dropout from secondary school.

     3.  A pupil who:

     (a) Has a physical or mental disability which substantially limits the pupil’s activities;

     (b) Had such a disability in the past; or

     (c) Is perceived by his or her peers as having such an impairment.

     4.  A pupil who meets one of the criteria established in 29 U.S.C. §§ 701 to 796, inclusive.

     5.  A pupil whose family has an income at or below the level of poverty established by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget.

     6.  A pupil in grades 9 to 12, inclusive, who qualifies for free lunch or lunch at reduced cost.

     7.  A pupil who is eligible for public assistance.

     8.  A pupil in grades 9 to 12, inclusive, who has failed one or more courses equal to one Carnegie Unit.

     9.  A pupil who has been absent from school 9 or more days in any one semester.

     10.  A pupil who is under the age of 18, is a parent or expectant parent and has not earned a high school diploma.

     11.  A pupil who is under the age of 18, has not earned a high school diploma and is unable to attend a regular course of study in high school because of misconduct in school or the action of a court.

     12.  A pupil who attends a school where a course of study in the desired vocational experience is not offered or available to the pupil.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87; A by R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.648  Skills to obtain employment: Duties of teacher. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  The teacher of a course of study in skills needed to obtain employment shall:

     1.  Design a plan of training for each pupil which designates the specific skills and levels of performance required of the pupil. The plan must be developed in cooperation with the employer, the pupil and, if necessary, other teachers.

     2.  Ensure that the pupil, his or her parent and the employer sign the plan.

     3.  Ensure that specific instruction prepares the pupil for obtaining a job.

     4.  Ensure that the employment teaches theory, how to make a decision, and cooperation.

     5.  Encourage training which is relevant to obtaining a job.

     6.  Strengthen the relationship between the school and the community.

     7.  Encourage participation by the community in the course of study.

     8.  Remind participants of their responsibilities and obligations.

     9.  Visit the place of employment of a pupil to evaluate the pupil, with the assistance of the employer.

     10.  Assist the employer with the development of each pupil’s agreement for training.

     11.  Encourage the development of effective skills of communication.

     12.  Seek suggestions from employers and pupils on ways to improve the course of study.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87)

     NAC 389.650  Skills to obtain employment: Duties of participating employer. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  An employer participating in a course of study in skills necessary to obtain employment shall:

     1.  Provide direct supervision of the pupil.

     2.  Encourage the pupil to develop skills which will lead to employability.

     3.  Provide an evaluation of a pupil’s performance, cooperation and self-discipline.

     4.  Encourage each pupil to accept responsibility and to develop initiative, cooperation and self-discipline.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87)

     NAC 389.6533  Introduction to keyboarding. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A course of study in an introduction to keyboarding must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to:

     1.  Demonstrate the correct method of inserting paper, adjusting the paper guides and adjusting the margins.

     2.  Demonstrate the use of function keys to operate a printer.

     3.  Type a paragraph without mistakes.

     4.  Demonstrate the operation of a keyboard by touch without watching the keys.

     5.  Demonstrate keyboard operations using number keys.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92)

     NAC 389.6549  Great Basin Native American language. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A course of study in a Great Basin Native American language must include instruction designed to teach the pupil to do the following:

     1.  After 1 year of instruction:

     (a) Understand routine questions, statements, commands and conversation.

     (b) Recognize the differences in intonation between questions, statements and commands.

     (c) Produce words and phrases used frequently in daily life.

     (d) Identify in oral speech highly contextualized cognates.

     (e) Understand and compose simple oral material.

     (f) Be familiar with the location and geography of the Native Americans whose language is being studied.

     (g) Be familiar with how the Native Americans whose language is being studied are related to other Native Americans in the Great Basin region.

     (h) Be familiar with important cultural features, prominent persons, current events and activities of the Native Americans whose language is being studied.

     (i) Be familiar with some of the major contributions to the culture of this State and the United States made by the Native Americans whose language is being studied.

     2.  After 2 years of instruction:

     (a) Understand simple conversation.

     (b) Understand the language of simple social conventions.

     (c) Distinguish the unique sounds of the language in familiar context.

     (d) Participate in familiar situations, including, without limitation, asking and answering questions, giving and following simple directions, engaging in conversation at a dinner table, and introducing oneself.

     (e) Understand a written passage sufficiently to use alternative language to communicate the content of the passage.

     (f) Retell familiar material.

     (g) Understand main ideas and facts from a simple oral text, including, without limitation, a story.

     (h) Follow oral directions.

     (i) Infer meaning from the context of the material studied and cognates.

     (j) Compose, with guidance from the instructor, short oral compositions, statements and dialogue.

     (k) Explore major aspects of the geography, daily life, celebrations, social customs, body language and proximity, perception of time and major historical events of the region where the language is spoken.

     (l) Continue to demonstrate an awareness of current events, communities and prominent persons of the region where the language is spoken.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R066-97, eff. 12-10-97)

Requirements for Promotion to Next Higher Grade Level and Issuance of Diplomas

     NAC 389.6552  Passage of end-of-course examinations required for diploma to be awarded. (NRS 385.080, 389.805)

     1.  A pupil in the graduating cohort of 2017 or 2018 must not be given a standard high school diploma until the pupil has passed:

     (a) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in Mathematics I;

     (b) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in Mathematics II;

     (c) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in English Language Arts I; and

     (d) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in English Language Arts II.

     2.  For the purposes of subsection 1, a pupil shall be deemed to have passed an end-of-course examination if the pupil obtains at least the passing score published for the examination by the Department or:

     (a) Passes the course with which the examination is aligned, in accordance with any established grading policy of the school district or charter school, as applicable; and

     (b) Takes and makes a reasonable attempt to complete the examination.

     3.  A pupil in the graduating cohort of 2019 must not be given a standard high school diploma until the pupil has passed:

     (a) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in Mathematics I;

     (b) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in Mathematics II;

     (c) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in English Language Arts I; and

     (d) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in English Language Arts II.

     4.  A pupil in the graduating cohort of 2020 or any year thereafter must not be given a standard high school diploma until the pupil has passed:

     (a) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in Mathematics I;

     (b) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in Mathematics II;

     (c) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in English Language Arts;

     (d) The Nevada End-of-Course Examination in Science; and

     (e) Any other end-of-course examination required by the State Board which is applicable to a graduating cohort.

     5.  Each edition of an end-of-course examination must be based upon the standards of content and performance established for the applicable course of study pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R061-14, eff. 12-22-2014; A by R036-15, 10-27-2015)

     NAC 389.658  Submission of results of end-of-course examinations. (NRS 385.080, 389.805)

     1.  The board of trustees of each school district shall submit the results of the end-of-course examinations to the Superintendent of Public Instruction by the time and in the form and manner he or she requires.

     2.  The Superintendent shall annually notify each board of trustees of the requirements for submitting the results.

     [Dep’t of Education, Proficiency Examination Reg. Nos. 1-3, eff. 2-15-80] — (NAC A by Bd. of Education by R115-97, 12-10-97; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.6585  Publication of standards and passing grades; submission by school districts and charter schools of certain information; review and approval by Department. (NRS 385.080, 389.805)

     1.  Immediately preceding each school year and for each end-of-course examination, the Department will:

     (a) On or before June 1, publish the standards for the examination; and

     (b) On or before July 15, publish the passing grade for the examination.

     2.  Each school district and charter school shall, on or before July 1 of each year and for each course for which an end-of-course examination is approved, submit to the Department:

     (a) The titles and corresponding codes of the course; and

     (b) An alignment chart which demonstrates that the pupils enrolled in the course will receive instruction in accordance with the standards of content and performance established for that course pursuant to NRS 389.520.

     3.  The Department will review the information described in subsection 2 and, on or before August 1 of each year, give written notice to the school district or charter school, as applicable, of the end-of-course examination approved for each course for which the school district or charter school submitted the information.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R061-14, eff. 12-22-2014; A by R061-14, 12-22-2014, eff. 1-1-2015)

     NAC 389.659  Units of credit or semesters required for promotion to next higher grade level; waiver of certain requirements. (NRS 385.080)

     1.  If a pupil enrolls in the 9th grade:

     (a) Except as otherwise provided in subsection 2, the pupil must:

          (1) Earn a minimum of 5 units of credit or complete 2 semesters of high school to be promoted to the 10th grade.

          (2) Earn a minimum of 11 units of credit or complete 4 semesters of high school to be promoted to the 11th grade.

          (3) Earn a minimum of 17 units of credit or complete 6 semesters of high school to be promoted to the 12th grade.

     (b) A school district shall evaluate the transcripts of the pupil if the pupil transferred to a high school within the school district from another high school located outside the school district, whether located inside or outside this State, to determine the grade level for which the pupil qualifies pursuant to paragraph (a).

     2.  The superintendent of a local school district may waive the requirement set forth in:

     (a) Subparagraph (1) of paragraph (a) of subsection 1 if:

          (1) The local school district is a school district in which the 9th grade is taught in a junior high or middle school; and

          (2) The superintendent determines that extenuating circumstances exist; and

     (b) Subparagraph (3) of paragraph (a) of subsection 1 if the superintendent determines that extenuating circumstances exist.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R091-99, eff. 1-14-2000; A by R022-09, 10-27-2009; R037-12, 9-14-2012)

     NAC 389.6625  Uniform grading scale; computation of grade point average; assignment of value to grade earned by pupil transferring from another state; applicability; policies assigning a plus or minus to grades. (NRS 385.080, 389.0195)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 6, the board of trustees of each school district and the governing body of each charter school shall use the following uniform grading scale for pupils enrolled in the school district or charter school in grades 9 to 12, inclusive:

 

Course Point Range

Grade

Value

90.0-100

A

4.0

80.0-89.99

B

3.0

70.0-79.99

C

2.0

60.0-69.99

D

1.0

Below 60

F

0.0

 

     2.  The grading scale prescribed by subsection 1 must be weighted as follows:

     (a) For completion of an honors course with a grade of A, B, C or D, a value of 0.025 must be added to the value otherwise prescribed by subsection 1.

     (b) For completion of an advanced placement course with a grade of A, B, C or D, a value of 0.050 must be added to the value otherwise prescribed by subsection 1.

     (c) For completion of an international baccalaureate course with a grade of A, B, C or D, a value of 0.050 must be added to the value otherwise prescribed by subsection 1.

     3.  The grade point average of a pupil enrolled in grade 9, 10, 11 or 12 must be computed to the third decimal place. A grade point average that:

     (a) Is less than 0.0005 must be rounded down; and

     (b) Is 0.0005 or higher must be rounded up.

     4.  If a pupil transfers from a high school located outside this State or from a private high school located in this State and enrolls in high school at a school district or charter school in this State, the pupil’s transcript must be reviewed and a value must be assigned for each grade earned by the pupil in the other state or at the private high school as follows:

     (a) If the pupil’s transcript contains a letter grade for a course, that letter grade must be assigned a numerical value in accordance with the grading scale prescribed by subsection 1.

     (b) If the pupil’s transcript does not contain a letter grade for a course but contains a numerical value for a grade in the course, that numerical value must be assigned in accordance with the grading scale prescribed by subsection 1.

     (c) If the pupil’s transcript contains a notation that the pupil has completed an honors course, an advanced placement course or an international baccalaureate course with a grade of A, B, C or D, the weighted value prescribed by subsection 2 must be applied for that course. If the transcript does not contain such a notation, the grading scale prescribed by subsection 1 must be applied for the course.

     5.  The uniform grading scale prescribed by this section applies to pupils who are enrolled in grade 9 beginning with the 2014-2015 school year, until graduation of those pupils, including, without limitation, pupils who repeat grade 9 in the 2014-2015 school year.

     6.  For pupils who are enrolled in grades 10, 11 and 12 for the 2014-2015 school year, a school district or charter school may, until graduation of those pupils:

     (a) Apply the uniform grading scale prescribed by this section; or

     (b) Continue applying the grading scale in effect for those pupils before the 2014-2015 school year.

     7.  The board of trustees of each school district and the governing body of each charter school may adopt a policy assigning a plus or minus to the grades set forth in subsection 1. The policy must ensure that the value assigned to each grade earned by a pupil complies with the value set forth in the grading scale prescribed by subsection 1 and, if applicable, the weighted value prescribed by subsection 2.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R012-08, eff. 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.663  Units of credit and grade point average required to receive advanced diploma. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.018, 389.805)

     1.  To receive an advanced diploma evidencing graduation from high school, a pupil must, in addition to meeting the criteria prescribed pursuant to subsection 2 of NRS 389.805, have:

     (a) Earned a minimum of 18 units of credit for required courses and 6 units of credit for elective courses for a total of at least 24 units of credit; and

     (b) Maintained at least a 3.25 grade point average on a 4.0 grading scale, weighted or unweighted, for all units of credit applicable toward graduation.

     2.  The units for the required courses must be earned in accordance with the following table:

 

 

Minimum

Required Course

Number of Units

 

 

American government...........................................................................

                   1

American history...................................................................................

                   1

Arts and humanities, Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (Level III or Level IV) or career and technical education..........................

                   1

Social studies........................................................................................

                   1

English, including reading, composition and writing...........................

                   4

Health education...................................................................................

                1/2

Mathematics..........................................................................................

                   4

Physical education................................................................................

                   2

Use of computers..................................................................................

                1/2

Science................................................................................................ 3

                   3

 

                                                                                                         TOTAL:

                 18

 

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R091-99, eff. 1-14-2000; A by R025-01, 11-1-2001; R061-02, 9-6-2002; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; A by Bd. of Education by R059-07, 10-31-2007, eff. 10-15-2008; R068-14, 10-24-2014; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.664  Units of credit required to receive standard diploma. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.018, 389.805)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 2, to receive a standard diploma evidencing graduation from high school, a pupil must, in addition to meeting the criteria prescribed pursuant to subsection 2 of NRS 389.805, have earned a minimum of 15 units of credit for required courses and 7 1/2 units of credit for elective courses for a total of at least 22 1/2 units of credit. The units for the required courses must be earned in accordance with the following table:

 

 

Minimum

Required Course

Number of Units

 

 

American government...........................................................................

                   1

American history...................................................................................

                   1

Arts and humanities, Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (Level III or Level IV) or career and technical education..........................

                   1

English, including reading, composition and writing...........................

                   4

Health education...................................................................................

                1/2

Mathematics..........................................................................................

                   3

Physical education................................................................................

                   2

Use of computers..................................................................................

                1/2

Science................................................................................................ 3

                   2

 

                                                                                                         TOTAL:

                 15

 

     2.  If a pupil satisfactorily completes a course of study in the use of computers during the sixth, seventh or eighth grade, the pupil is not required to take the course of study in the use of computers and must only earn a minimum of 14 1/2 units of credit for required courses pursuant to subsection 1. The course of study in the use of computers must be for at least one semester or trimester, or the equivalent, and must not be taught as part of another course of study. This subsection authorizes, but does not require, a school district to offer a course in the use of computers as part of the curriculum of a middle school.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A 5-4-87; R091-99, 1-14-2000; R037-99, 11-3-99, eff. 7-1-2000; R061-02, 9-6-2002; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; A by Bd. of Education by R037-12, 9-14-2012; R068-14, 10-24-2014; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.666  Units applicable toward graduation. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.155)  Units of credit which a pupil may apply toward graduation from high school may be earned:

     1.  In a public or private high school located in this State.

     2.  In a public or private high school located outside this State if the school district approves a transfer of the units for this purpose in accordance with subsection 4 of NAC 389.6625.

     3.  In an institution of higher learning whose academic programs are accredited by a national accrediting organization.

     4.  In the Nevada Youth Training Center or the Caliente Youth Center.

     5.  In a course of independent study conducted in accordance with NAC 389.710 to 389.750, inclusive.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A by R051-98, 9-9-98; R012-08, 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.668  Credit which may be granted in fractional time units. (NRS 385.080)  A high school which provides instruction in fractional time units may grant credit proportionately to the requirements for basic units of credits, but the school may not record less than one-fourth of a unit.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.115)

     NAC 389.670  Credit granted for performance on examination in lieu of course attendance: Board of trustees required to prescribe application and eligible courses of study; effect of pupil’s withdrawal from school; authority of State Board to review examination and minimum score required. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.171)

     1.  The board of trustees of each school district shall prescribe an application for pupils to apply for credit for a specific course of study without having attended the regularly scheduled classes in the course pursuant to NRS 389.171. The application must include, without limitation, the:

     (a) First and last name of the pupil;

     (b) Identifying information for the pupil, including, without limitation, the date of birth, individual identification number, ethnicity and gender of the pupil;

     (c) Grade level of the pupil;

     (d) Home telephone number of the pupil;

     (e) Name and identification number of the school in which the pupil is enrolled;

     (f) Signature of the school counselor at the school in which the pupil is enrolled; and

     (g) Name and number of the course of study for which the application is submitted.

     2.  The board of trustees of each school district shall prescribe the specific courses of study for which a pupil may be granted credit without having attended the regularly scheduled classes in the course pursuant to NRS 389.171, including, without limitation, Algebra I, Algebra II, geometry, trigonometry, computer literacy, English I, English II, English III, English IV, principles of science, life science, physical science, health, history of the United States, world history, government of the United States, sociology and world languages. The board of trustees of each school district shall make available to school counselors, pupils and parents of pupils a list of the courses of study prescribed pursuant to this subsection.

     3.  The board of trustees of each school district shall:

     (a) For the purposes of paragraph (a) of subsection 1 of NRS 389.171, establish a committee of teachers and administrators to select an appropriate examination for each course of study prescribed pursuant to subsection 2. The examination must be based on the standards of content and performance prescribed for that course and the curriculum for that course adopted by the school district.

     (b) For the purposes of paragraph (b) of subsection 1 of NRS 389.171, review and approve the examination developed by the principal and the pupil’s teacher who provides instruction in the course for which credit is being sought.

     (c) For the purposes of paragraph (c) of subsection 1 of NRS 389.171, review and approve the examination which the principal determines to be as rigorous or more rigorous than the examination selected pursuant to paragraph (a).

     (d) Prescribe a minimum score of not less than 70 which a pupil must achieve on an examination approved pursuant to paragraph (a), (b) or (c) of subsection 1 of NRS 389.171 to receive credit without having attended the regularly scheduled classes in the course. The minimum score must be established using objective criteria to ensure that a pupil demonstrates his or her proficiency to meet the objectives of the course.

     4.  If a pupil who is deficient in a particular area or areas of a course of study wishes to receive credit for the course of study pursuant to paragraph (b) of subsection 1 of NRS 389.171, the pupil must submit the application prescribed by the board of trustees of the school district pursuant to subsection 1:

     (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b), before the beginning of the school year immediately succeeding the school year in which the pupil was enrolled in the course.

     (b) Within 1 school year after the end of the course if the application includes evidence of the pupil’s completion during that year of not less than 20 hours of remedial study in the area or areas of the course in which the pupil is deficient.

     5.  A pupil who withdraws from a school during the school year and does not reenroll in the school from which he or she withdrew or who does not enroll in another school in this State before the end of the current semester or trimester, as applicable, is not eligible to receive credit for a course of study pursuant to NRS 389.171.

     6.  The State Board of Education may review:

     (a) Any examination for which a pupil may receive credit for a course of study without having attended the regularly scheduled classes in the course pursuant to NRS 389.171; and

     (b) The minimum score required on any such examination.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A by R134-07, 6-17-2008; R024-09, 10-27-2009; R041-11, 12-30-2011; R063-14, 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.672  Academic credit for a course of study in career and technical education: Limitations and prerequisites. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360)

     1.  A board of trustees may allow a pupil to earn, towards the units necessary for graduation from high school, two units of the credit required in English, one unit required in mathematics, one unit required in science and one-half unit required in health if he or she is enrolled in a course of study in career and technical education approved pursuant to this section within one of the program areas set forth in subsection 1 of NAC 389.803 and that course includes, as part of its curriculum, the curriculum of the required course.

     2.  The superintendent of the school district shall appoint a committee composed of one person certified to teach in the course of study in career and technical education and one person certified to teach in the academic area in which the credit may be earned. The committee must verify to the board of trustees that the curriculum for the course of study in career and technical education includes the curriculum of the required course of study for which a pupil may earn credit.

     3.  After verification has been received by the board of trustees, the written curriculum and title of the course of study in career and technical education and a statement of the academic credit to be granted must be submitted to the State Board of Education for approval. Academic credit may be granted for the course of study in career and technical education or a combination of courses only after the State Board of Education has given its approval.

     4.  The Superintendent of Public Instruction may give approval for the granting of academic credit to a board of trustees requesting to use a curriculum for a course of study in career and technical education that has been approved by the State Board of Education for another school district if:

     (a) The procedures set forth in subsection 2 were followed by the requesting district; and

     (b) The board of trustees provides assurances that it will not deviate from the curriculum that has been approved by the State Board of Education.

     5.  A pupil who earns academic credit pursuant to this section must be notified that the approval for academic credit is designed to meet the requirements for graduation from high school and may not necessarily be accepted for academic credit by a specific postsecondary institution. A copy of the notification given to the pupil must accompany the other materials to be submitted to the State Board of Education for final approval.

     6.  A minimum number of credits must be earned in the respective academic areas, as follows:

     (a) At least two credits must be earned in the academic mathematics department;

     (b) At least one credit must be earned in the academic science department; and

     (c) At least two credits must be earned in the academic English department.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87; A by Bd. for Occupational Education, 3-27-92; 11-17-95; A by Bd. of Education by R069-97, 12-10-97, eff. 9-1-99; R155-01, 12-17-2001; R195-01, 4-1-2002; R165-03, R166-03, R184-03 & R185-03, 1-22-2004; R236-03, 3-19-2004; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; A by Bd. of Education by R132-10, 12-16-2010; A by R087-12, 11-1-2012)

     NAC 389.673  Academic credit for courses of study in career and technical education: Periodic review and approval of each course. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360)

     1.  The superintendent of each school district which is authorized by the State Board of Education to grant academic credit for a course of study in career and technical education pursuant to NAC 389.672 shall, at least once every 3 years, appoint a committee to review that course of study. The committee must consist of one person who is certified to teach in the course of study in career and technical education and one person who is certified to teach in the academic area in which the credit may be earned.

     2.  After the committee has reviewed the course of study in career and technical education, it shall submit a written report of its review to the board of trustees of the school district. The report must include a statement signed by the members of the committee that the curriculum for the course of study in career and technical education includes the curriculum of the required course of study.

     3.  The board of trustees shall submit to the State Board of Education, for its approval, the written curriculum and title of the course of study in career and technical education and a statement of the academic credit it proposes to grant.

     4.  Academic credit may be granted for the course of study in career and technical education or combination of courses only after the State Board of Education has given its approval.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R069-97, 12-10-97, eff. 9-1-99; A by R087-12, 11-1-2012)

     NAC 389.674  Credit for equivalent experience outside campus or program. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)

     1.  A school district may, under suitable criteria, allow credit toward graduation from high school for a pupil’s experiences outside the high school campus if those experiences are equivalent in kind and amount to the educational experiences being offered in the high school.

     2.  A school district may, under suitable criteria, allow credit toward completion of an adult high school program for a pupil’s experiences outside the adult high school program if those experiences are equivalent in kind and amount to the educational experiences being offered in the adult high school program.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A by R134-07, 6-17-2008)

     NAC 389.676  Credit for sectarian religious courses not allowed. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  Credit for sectarian religious courses may not be applied to fulfill requirements for graduation from high school.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.130)

     NAC 389.678  Summer school units applicable toward graduation. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.160)

     1.  Summer school units of credit to be applied toward graduation from high school may consist only of units earned through a summer school conducted by a public or private high school or an accredited institution of higher learning.

     2.  Such units must be earned in courses which are equivalent to the courses offered in the programs of the high school.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.135)

     NAC 389.680  Credit for correspondence courses. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.160)

     1.  A school district may, in accordance with policies developed by the board of trustees of the school district, grant a pupil credit toward graduation from high school or toward completion of an adult high school program for his or her successful completion of a correspondence course if:

     (a) The course is provided by a secondary educational institution which is approved by the State Board of Education; and

     (b) The course is equivalent to a course offered in a regular program in the school district or a course offered in an adult high school program in the school district, as applicable.

     2.  A school district shall, in accordance with policies developed by the board of trustees of the school district, grant a pupil credit toward graduation from high school or toward completion of an adult high school program, as applicable, for his or her successful completion of a correspondence course if:

     (a) The course is provided and credit was issued by a secondary educational institution which is accredited by:

          (1) The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools;

          (2) The New England Association of Schools and Colleges;

          (3) The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools;

          (4) The Northwest Accreditation Commission;

          (5) The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools;

          (6) The Western Association of Schools and Colleges; or

          (7) The Commission on International and Trans-Regional Accreditation; and

     (b) The course is equivalent to a course offered in a regular program in the school district or a course offered in an adult high school program in the school district, as applicable.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A by R088-05, 10-31-2005; R134-07, 6-17-2008)

     NAC 389.682  Requirements for graduation for pupils transferring to Nevada high school. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)

     1.  A pupil who transfers to a Nevada high school from another school, whether located inside or outside this State, shall abide by the requirements for graduation of the receiving school district unless the pupil is in the 12th grade and the requirements of that district would not allow him or her to graduate by the end of the 12th grade.

     2.  Each school district shall develop a policy and procedure to make an allowance for a pupil in the latter circumstances so that the pupil may graduate from:

     (a) The receiving school under its requirements or the minimum requirements of the State Board of Education; or

     (b) The pupil’s school of origin if that school is willing to issue the diploma.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.145)

     NAC 389.684  Schools prohibited from reducing or reevaluating credits transferred from another school. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A school shall not reduce or reevaluate a pupil’s credit which has been officially transferred from another public or private school or from the Nevada Youth Training Center or the Caliente Youth Center.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82)

     NAC 389.686  Exemptions for certain high schools from requirements for graduation. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  The Superintendent of Public Instruction may exempt from the requirements for graduation from high school students graduating from a high school with less than 100 students if the school is unable to obtain certified staff to meet the requirements. Before the beginning of the school year for which an exception is to be effective, the superintendent of a school district with such a high school with less than 100 students may apply to the Superintendent of Public Instruction for an exception from the graduation requirements enacted after July 1, 1988. This exception may be approved at the discretion of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for those high schools with less than 100 students that are unable to recruit certified staff to meet the requirements. The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall notify in writing the superintendent of the school district of the exceptions that have been granted or denied and furnish a report to the State Board of Education of each exception granted at the next regularly scheduled meeting after the exception is granted.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 5-4-87)

     NAC 389.688  Requirements for adult standard diploma. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 389.805)

     1.  A school district may award an adult standard diploma to a person who:

     (a) Withdrew from high school before the person’s graduation and was not eligible to graduate with his or her class, or participated in an alternative program for the education of pupils at risk of dropping out of school established by a school district pursuant to NRS 388.537;

     (b) Has passed all required end-of-course examinations;

     (c) Has earned, in high school, in an adult high school program or in an alternative program for the education of pupils at risk of dropping out of school established by a school district pursuant to NRS 388.537, or waived, the units of credit required in subsection 2; and

     (d) Is 18 years of age or older at the time of the award or is 17 years of age but less than 18 years of age and participates in an alternative program for the education of pupils at risk of dropping out of school pursuant to NRS 388.537.

     2.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 3, the units of credit which a person must have earned or waived to be qualified to receive an adult standard diploma are a total of 13 units for required courses and a total of 7 1/2 units for elective courses. The person must have earned or waived his or her units for the required courses in accordance with the following table:

 

 

Minimum

Required Course

Number of Units

 

 

American government................................................................................

                 1

American history........................................................................................

                 1

Arts and humanities, Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (Level III or Level IV) or career and technical education.....................................

                 1

English.......................................................................................................

                 4

Health education........................................................................................

              1/2

Mathematics...............................................................................................

                 3

Science.......................................................................................................

                 2

Use of computers.......................................................................................

              1/2

 

 

                                                                                                              TOTAL:

               13

 

     3.  If a person demonstrates a competency in the use of computers, the person is not required to complete the course in the use of computers and must earn or waive a total of 12 1/2 units in required courses.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, 12-16-82, eff. 7-1-83; A 5-4-87; 3-9-88, eff. 7-1-92; R067-97, 12-10-97; R037-99, 11-3-99, eff. 7-1-2000; R029-01, 11-1-2001, eff. 7-1-2002; R061-02, 9-6-2002; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; A by Bd. of Education by R134-07, 6-17-2008; R082-14, 10-24-2014; R061-14, 12-22-2014)

     NAC 389.690  Credit received through adult high school program applicable toward adult standard diploma. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)

     1.  Units of credit earned by a person through an adult high school program may be applied toward meeting the requirements for an adult standard diploma only if the course in which the units were earned was:

     (a) Taught in a school district of this State; or

     (b) Equivalent to a regular course offered in the high school where the diploma will be issued, and the course is approved by the principal of the high school for that purpose.

     2.  As used in this section, “adult high school program” means instruction or training provided at or below the level of a secondary school for persons who:

     (a) Are at least 18 years of age and who have not completed high school.

     (b) Are 17 years of age but less than 18 years of age and participate in an alternative program for the education of pupils at risk of dropping out of school pursuant to NRS 388.537.

     (c) Are 16 years of age and authorized to attend an adult high school program pursuant to NAC 389.695.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A by R067-97, 12-10-97; R029-01, 11-1-2001; R134-07, 6-17-2008)

     NAC 389.692  Other credits applicable toward adult standard diploma. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A school district may award a person units of credit toward meeting the requirements for an adult standard diploma if he or she successfully completes:

     1.  A course given by the United States Armed Forces Institute or a high school course offered through that institute by a cooperating college or university;

     2.  A subject examination given by the Armed Forces;

     3.  A course given by the United States Marine Corps Institute;

     4.  A course given by the United States Coast Guard Institute; or

     5.  A course of training conducted by a branch of the Armed Forces.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.170)

     NAC 389.694  Waiver of credits for adult standard diploma; scores required on high school equivalency assessment for waiver. (NRS 385.080, 385.448)

     1.  Except as otherwise provided in this section, a person who is 18 years of age or older and who seeks an adult standard diploma may waive units of credit for language arts, mathematics, science and social studies by taking a high school equivalency assessment in those subjects. A person who seeks an adult standard diploma who is at least 17 years of age but less than 18 years of age and who is enrolled in an alternative program for the education of pupils at risk of dropping out of school established by a school district pursuant to NRS 388.537 may waive units of credit pursuant to this section.

     2.  The maximum number of credits which may be waived in the areas of language arts, mathematics and science must be based on the number of credits previously earned which meet the minimum requirements for course content outlined in NAC 389.450 to 389.511, inclusive, and the credits waived upon the completion of a high school equivalency assessment selected pursuant to NRS 385.448.

     3.  Credits in elective courses may be waived only in the area of social studies. The maximum number of credits which may be waived in the area of social studies must be based on a high school equivalency assessment selected pursuant to NRS 385.448.

     4.  The following tables set forth the scores which a person must achieve on a high school equivalency assessment to waive credits in required and elective courses and the corresponding number of units which may be waived:

 

General Educational Development Test (2002 Series)

 

 

Maximum Number of Units

 

Designation of

For Score of

For Score of

Subject

Test

450 to 499.9

500 or higher

 

 

 

 

English

I and IV (average)

2

4

Mathematics

V

1

3

Science

III

1

2

Social Studies

II

1

2

 

General Educational Development Test (2014 Series)

 

 

Maximum Number of Units

 

Designation of

For Score of

For Score of

Subject

Test

150 to 162

163 or higher

 

 

 

 

Language Arts

I

2

4

Mathematics

II

1

3

Science

III

1

2

Social Studies

IV

1

2

 

HiSET Exam (2014 Series)

 

 

Maximum Number of Units

 

Designation of

For Score of

For Score of

Subject

Test

10 or 11

12 or higher

 

 

 

 

Language Arts

I and V (average)

2

4

Mathematics

II

1

3

Science

III

1

2

Social Studies

IV

1

2

 

Test Assessing Secondary Completion (2014 Series)

 

 

Maximum Number of Units

 

Designation of

For Score of

For Score of

Subject

Test

500 to 529

530 or higher

 

 

 

 

Language Arts

I and V (average)

2

4

Mathematics

II

1

3

Science

III

1

2

Social Studies

IV

1

2

 

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82; A 5-4-87; 3-9-88; R067-97, 12-10-97; R029-01, 11-1-2001; R194-01, 4-1-2002; R194-01, 4-1-2002, eff. 7-1-2002; R134-07, 6-17-2008; R155-13, 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.695  Attendance at adult high school program for test preparation. (NRS 385.080, 385.448)  The board of trustees of a school district may allow a person who is at least 16 years of age but less than 18 years of age who has withdrawn from high school so that he or she may take a high school equivalency assessment to attend an adult high school program only for the purpose of test preparation.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R029-01, eff. 11-1-2001; A by R134-07, 6-17-2008; R155-13, 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.696  Individualized program of education for pupil with disability. (NRS 385.080, 388.520)

     1.  The board of trustees of each school district shall have an individualized educational program prepared for each pupil with a disability who is enrolled in a public high school in the district. The program must include:

     (a) A statement of the pupil’s present levels of educational performance;

     (b) A statement of annual goals, including short-term instructional objectives;

     (c) A statement of the specific special education and related services to be provided to the pupil and the extent to which he or she will be able to participate in regular educational programs;

     (d) The projected dates for initiation of services and the anticipated duration of the services;

     (e) Appropriate objective criteria, procedures for evaluation and schedules for determining, at least on an annual basis, whether the short-term instructional objectives are being achieved;

     (f) A schedule of meetings with the pupil and his or her parents or a record of attempts to schedule such meetings if such meetings are appropriate for a review of the pupil’s progress; and

     (g) If appropriate, the special requirements or adjusted standards which the pupil must meet for graduation from high school.

     2.  A pupil with a disability, whether in a public or private high school, in the Nevada Youth Training Center or in the Caliente Youth Center, is entitled to graduate from high school with:

     (a) A standard diploma if the pupil fulfills all the requirements for a standard diploma except for any appropriate accommodations which are outlined in his or her individualized program of education.

     (b) An adjusted diploma if the pupil fulfills all the requirements which are outlined in his or her individualized program of education.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.180)

     NAC 389.698  Adjusted diploma for pupil with disability. (NRS 385.080, 388.520)  An adjusted diploma may be earned by any pupil with a disability who meets the standards prescribed by his or her individualized education plan.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 3-9-88)

Miscellaneous Provisions

     NAC 389.700  Transcript of high school record. (NRS 385.080)

     1.  In preparing a transcript of a pupil’s high school record of courses, credits and grades, the school district shall use:

     (a) The form of transcript prescribed by the Superintendent of Public Instruction; or

     (b) An alternative form approved by the Superintendent.

     2.  In lieu of issuing the original transcript of a pupil’s record, a school district may issue a photostatic copy if it is certified by the principal of the school to be a true, or official, copy of the original.

     3.  Each school district shall provide on all its permanent records and transcripts an explanation of the system of symbols which it uses for grading.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 12-16-82) — (Substituted in revision for NAC 389.185)

Program of Independent Study

     NAC 389.710  “Independent study” defined. (NRS 385.080, 389.155)  As used in NAC 389.710 to 389.750, inclusive, unless the context otherwise requires, “independent study” means the method by which a pupil may complete a required or elective course outside of the normal classroom setting that is consistent with the course of study prescribed by the State Board.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R051-98, eff. 9-9-98; A by R134-07, 6-17-2008)

     NAC 389.720  Plan to operate program; approval or denial of plan; written policy; system of recordkeeping. (NRS 385.080, 389.155)

     1.  The board of trustees of a school district may submit to the Department of Education, in the form prescribed by the Department, a plan to operate a program of independent study. The program of independent study must contain the information prescribed in subsection 3 and must be offered as part of:

     (a) An adult high school program;

     (b) An alternative program for the education of pupils at risk of dropping out of school;

     (c) A program of distance education; or

     (d) Any other educational program offered by the school district.

     2.  The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall review each plan to operate a program of independent study submitted to the Department of Education and approve or deny the plan. If the plan is denied by the Superintendent, the school district may appeal the decision of the Superintendent to the State Board of Education. The State Board may approve or deny the plan for a program of independent study upon appeal.

     3.  The board of trustees of a school district which provides for independent study shall:

     (a) Develop a written policy for independent study, which must include, without limitation, the process by which a pupil may appeal a decision by the board of trustees which denies the pupil from enrolling in a course of independent study.

     (b) Establish a system of recordkeeping for each pupil enrolled in a course of independent study. For each course that a pupil participates in, the record must include, without limitation:

          (1) A copy of the written agreement required pursuant to NAC 389.750;

          (2) A record of all communication between the pupil and the teacher;

          (3) A record of the assignments that the pupil has completed; and

          (4) A copy of the record which indicates the final grade and the number of units of credit earned by the pupil.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R051-98, eff. 9-9-98; A by R134-07, 6-17-2008)

     NAC 389.730  Courses allowed; courses outside school district. (NRS 385.080, 389.155)

     1.  A pupil who is enrolled in school or in an alternative program pursuant to NRS 388.537, an adult high school program approved pursuant to NAC 387.190 or a program of distance education established by a school district may complete any required or elective course by independent study if the board of trustees of the school district in which the pupil is enrolled provides for independent study in accordance with NAC 389.710 to 389.750, inclusive.

     2.  A course of independent study may be taken at a location outside of the school district in which the pupil is enrolled upon the written approval of the board of trustees of the school district in which the pupil is enrolled.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R051-98, eff. 9-9-98; A by R218-99, 5-4-2000; R134-07, 6-17-2008)

     NAC 389.740  Licensing of instructors; supervision required for certain courses. (NRS 385.080, 389.155)

     1.  The instructor of record for a course of independent study must be a person who is licensed to teach in this State.

     2.  If the board of trustees of a school district that provides for independent study determines that an activity which is part of the course of independent study constitutes a risk to the health or safety of a pupil who is enrolled in the course, the course must be supervised by a person who has been approved by the board of trustees.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R051-98, eff. 9-9-98)

     NAC 389.750  Written agreement with pupil. (NRS 385.080, 389.155)

     1.  A pupil shall enter into a written agreement with the teacher of the course of independent study or the board of trustees of the school district or its designee before the pupil may begin a course or program of independent study. A pupil may enter into a written agreement if the pupil participates in:

     (a) An adult high school program;

     (b) An alternative program;

     (c) A program of distance education; or

     (d) Any other educational program offered by the school district.

     2.  Such an agreement must include, without limitation:

     (a) The objectives of the course or program.

     (b) A timeline for the completion of the assigned course work.

     (c) A schedule of the communications between the pupil and the teacher that satisfies the requirements of subparagraph (2) of paragraph (a) of subsection 2 of NRS 389.155.

     (d) The method by which the teacher will assess the learning of the pupil.

     (e) If a pupil is under 18 years of age, the written approval of a parent or guardian of the pupil to participate in the course of independent study.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R051-98, eff. 9-9-98; A by R218-99, 5-4-2000; R134-07, 6-17-2008)

Program of Career and Technical Education

     NAC 389.800  General requirements for program. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360, 388.380)

     1.  Courses of study in career and technical education offered by the board of trustees of a school district in a program area for a program of career and technical education set forth in subsection 1 of NAC 389.803 must:

     (a) Be based upon state standards and a written curriculum that has been developed in collaboration with representatives of the industry being studied to measure the competency of the pupil and which includes:

          (1) The current skills and levels of performance necessary to perform the duties and tasks involved in being employed in the career field being taught or to support advancement in education and job training in a related career.

          (2) Instruction which reinforces academic skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, mathematics, science and using technology.

     (b) Be designed to:

          (1) Allow the pupil to pursue postsecondary academic options, career training or a recognized industry credential.

          (2) Include pupils with disabilities.

     (c) Provide the pupil with reasonable access to standard equipment used in the industry the pupil is studying.

     (d) Include instruction in employability skills for career readiness prescribed for the course of study in NAC 389.555 and measure the proficiency of the pupil in the standards prescribed for that course of study through an assessment that measures proficiency in employability skills prescribed by the Department of Education.

     (e) Require a pupil who completes the final course of instruction for a particular course of study in career and technical education to take an end-of-program assessment prescribed by the Department of Education which measures the proficiency of the pupil in the course of study, if such an examination is available.

     2.  The teacher of a course of study in career and technical education shall:

     (a) Possess a valid endorsement to his or her license for each industry in which he or she teaches a course of study.

     (b) Use resources, materials and techniques which do not discriminate among pupils.

     (c) Evaluate the pupil’s achievement of the required goals in the course of study.

     3.  Each pupil enrolled in a course of study in career and technical education:

     (a) Must be given the opportunity to participate in career and technical student organizations that are:

          (1) Affiliated with state and national organizations;

          (2) Associated with the industry the pupil is studying; and

          (3) An integral part of the instructional program.

     (b) Upon completion of the program, should be qualified to enter a higher level of training or to enroll in a program of postsecondary education without the necessity of repeating previously learned skills.

     4.  Each pupil who completes a course of study in career and technical education must be awarded a certificate which states that he or she has attained specific skills in the industry being studied if the pupil:

     (a) Maintained at least a 3.0 grade point average, based on a 4.0 grading scale, for all units of credit applicable toward the course of study in career and technical education;

     (b) Passed the assessment that measures proficiency in employability skills prescribed by the Department of Education pursuant to paragraph (d) of subsection 1; and

     (c) Passed the end-of-program assessment prescribed by the Department of Education pursuant to paragraph (e) of subsection 1, if applicable.

     5.  Each school district shall submit to the Department of Education an annual report that lists the number of pupils to whom a certificate has been awarded pursuant to subsection 4.

     6.  The superintendent of each school district that establishes a program of career and technical education:

     (a) Shall maintain a current and comprehensive inventory of all capital equipment, if any, maintained for each course offered in career and technical education;

     (b) Shall establish a list of equipment that is comparable to that used in the related career fields in which a course of study is offered;

     (c) Shall not allow the use in career and technical education of equipment or facilities which do not meet the generally applicable safety requirements, including those adopted to ensure occupational safety and health for that career field; and

     (d) Shall adopt a written statement of philosophy for the program of career and technical education, which must include, without limitation, stated goals that such instruction will align to state standards and support advancement in education and job training in a related career.

     7.  The teacher of a course of study in career and technical education shall cooperate with the guidance counselor of each school to assist pupils to enroll in an appropriate course of study. The guidance counselor shall assist the pupil to achieve:

     (a) An awareness of the opportunities for the development of technical and employability skills required in the various industries.

     (b) An exploration of the pupil’s abilities with his or her career interest.

     (c) Completion of the course of study in career and technical education.

     (d) Opportunities for continued career development, education and training.

     8.  The Department of Education shall cause surveys to be taken of each pupil who has completed a course of study in career and technical education to determine the effectiveness of the program.

     9.  The State Board for Career and Technical Education will request the Superintendent of Public Instruction to maintain a list of industry credentials and certificates and to require school districts to report the number of pupils who earn each of those credentials and certificates.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. for Occupational Education, 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006; A by Bd. of Education by R001-12, 5-30-2012; R061-12, 9-14-2012; R087-12, 11-1-2012; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R154-13, 6-23-2014)

     NAC 389.803  Program areas. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360)

     1.  The board of trustees of a school district may offer any of the following program areas for a program of career and technical education in a public high school:

     (a) Agriculture and natural resources, which may include the following courses of study:

          (1) Agricultural business systems.

          (2) Agricultural leadership, communication and policy.

          (3) Agricultural mechanics technology.

          (4) Animal science.

          (5) Environmental management.

          (6) Floriculture design and management.

          (7) Food science technology.

          (8) Landscape design and management.

          (9) Natural resources and wildlife management.

          (10) Ornamental horticulture greenhouse management.

          (11) Veterinary science.

     (b) Business and marketing education, which may include the following courses of study:

          (1) Accounting and finance.

          (2) Administrative services.

          (3) Business management.

          (4) Entrepreneurship.

          (5) Marketing.

          (6) Sports and entertainment marketing.

     (c) Education, hospitality and human services, which may include the following courses of study:

          (1) Baking and pastry.

          (2) Cosmetology.

          (3) Culinary arts.

          (4) Early childhood education.

          (5) Family and consumer sciences.

          (6) Foods and nutrition.

          (7) Hospitality and tourism.

          (8) Human development.

     (d) Health science and public safety, which may include the following courses of study:

          (1) Biomedical.

          (2) Criminal justice.

          (3) Dental assisting.

          (4) Emergency medical technician.

          (5) Emergency telecommunications.

          (6) Fire science.

          (7) Forensic science.

          (8) Health information management.

          (9) Law enforcement.

          (10) Medical assisting.

          (11) Nursing assistant.

          (12) Pharmacy practice.

          (13) Respiratory therapy.

          (14) Sports medicine.

     (e) Information and media technologies, which may include the following courses of study:

          (1) Animation.

          (2) Computer science.

          (3) Digital game development.

          (4) Fashion, textiles and design.

          (5) Graphic design.

          (6) Information technology for networking.

          (7) Information technology for service and support.

          (8) Interior design.

          (9) Photography.

          (10) Radio production.

          (11) Theatre technology.

          (12) Video production.

          (13) Web design and development.

     (f) Skilled and technical sciences, which may include the following courses of study:

          (1) Aerospace engineering.

          (2) Architectural and civil engineering.

          (3) Architectural design.

          (4) Automotive service technician.

          (5) Automotive technology.

          (6) Aviation maintenance technician.

          (7) Aviation technology.

          (8) Collision repair technology.

          (9) Construction technology.

          (10) Diesel technology.

          (11) Drafting and design.

          (12) Electrical engineering.

          (13) Electronic technology.

          (14) Energy technologies.

          (15) Environmental engineering.

          (16) Furniture and cabinetmaking.

          (17) Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration.

          (18) Machine tool technology.

          (19) Manufacturing technologies.

          (20) Mechanical engineering.

          (21) Mechanical technology.

          (22) Metalworking.

          (23) Welding technology.

     2.  If the board of trustees of a school district offers a program area set forth in subsection 1, the courses of study which the board of trustees offers within that program area must comply with the standards of content and performance established by the State Board of Education for that course of study if the Board has established such standards. A copy of any standards of content and performance that the Board has established for those courses of study are available on the website maintained by the Department of Education at the Internet address http://cteae.nv.gov/Career_and_Technical_Education/Standards/.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R087-12, eff. 11-1-2012; A by R081-14, 10-24-2014; R066-15, 12-21-2015)

     NAC 389.805  Duties of Department of Education and school district. (NRS 385.080, 388.360)

     1.  The Department of Education shall develop and administer a career and technical education reporting system which provides information regarding the enrollment in, completion of and staffing of career and technical education courses. The Department of Education shall provide guidance and technical assistance to each school district concerning participation in the system.

     2.  Each school district shall participate in the system by:

     (a) Maintaining records of such information as the Department of Education requires; and

     (b) Providing the Department with the records maintained pursuant to paragraph (a) at a time and in a manner approved by the Department.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education, eff. 10-8-93; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006)

     NAC 389.810  Establishment and duties of joint technical skills committees and career and technical education councils. (NRS 388.360)

     1.  If a community college located within a local school district provides career and technical instruction for a specific job for which the local school district also provides an instructional program, the superintendent of that school district shall establish a joint technical skills committee for each such program of career and technical education to review and determine annually the tasks, duties and competency levels to be taught. The committee shall assist the school district and be available to assist the community college upon request.

     2.  The superintendent of each local school district which is located in a county:

     (a) Whose population is 35,000 or more; and

     (b) In which a campus of the community college is located,

Ê may establish a career and technical education council to assist the school district and be available to assist, upon request, the community college. To the extent possible, the superintendent shall draw the membership from among the members of an advisory technical skills committee formed pursuant to NRS 388.385. Educators may serve on the council in an advisory, nonvoting capacity only. The council shall render advice on questions of policy regarding the programs of career and technical education where employment demands are being met and shall make recommendations regarding the expansion, improvement and modernization of all of the programs. The council shall also recommend methods to establish a cooperative mechanism for local businesses and industries to share with the school district the instruction, facilities and equipment necessary for the programs and to participate in the resulting efforts needed to secure employment for the pupils who complete the programs.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. for Occupational Education, 1-26-90, eff. 9-1-92; A 3-30-92; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, 2-23-2006)

     NAC 389.815  Requirements for endorsement on diploma indicating successful completion of program. (NRS 385.080, 385.110, 388.360, 388.380, 389.805)

     1.  To qualify for an endorsement on a high school diploma indicating that a pupil has successfully completed a course of study in a program area for a program of career and technical education set forth in subsection 1 of NAC 389.803, the pupil must:

     (a) Satisfactorily complete a sequence of courses leading to a completion course prescribed by the school district or charter school in which the pupil is enrolled for the course of study selected.

     (b) Satisfy the state academic requirements governing receipt of a standard high school diploma and the statutes and regulations governing the receipt of a standard high school diploma, including, without limitation, passage of all required end-of-course examinations.

     (c) Satisfy the requirements for the issuance of a certificate pursuant to subsection 4 of NAC 389.800.

     2.  The sequence and completion courses required by paragraph (a) of subsection 1 must be approved by the Department.

     3.  The endorsement must be located on the front of the high school diploma in a format prescribed by the Department of Education.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R172-05, eff. 2-23-2006; A by Bd. of Education by R087-12, 11-1-2012; A by Bd. for Career & Tech. Educ. by R154-13, 6-23-2014; A by Bd. of Education by R061-14, 12-22-2014)

Public or Private Internships

     NAC 389.825  Reporting of certain information to State Board; approval and notice. (NRS 385.080, 389.167)

     1.  The board of trustees of a school district or the governing body of a charter school that authorizes pupils enrolled in the school district or charter school to participate in a public or private internship pursuant to NRS 389.167, as applicable, shall submit a report to the State Board not more than two times each school year that includes, without limitation:

     (a) Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph, the information which the board of trustees or governing body is required to prescribe pursuant to paragraph (a) of subsection 2 of NRS 389.167. If the information has been submitted in a previous report and has not changed since the last report was approved by the State Board, the board of trustees or governing body, as applicable, may instead include a statement that the information has not changed.

     (b) The number of pupils who earned elective credit by successfully completing a public or private internship during the previous school year.

     2.  The State Board will consider whether to approve a report submitted pursuant to this section at its next meeting immediately following receipt of the report. The State Board will approve the report if all of the information required pursuant to subsection 1 is included in the report. After the meeting, the State Board will notify the board of trustees or governing body, as applicable, that the State Board:

     (a) Has approved the report and that pupils may participate in a public or private internship for the purposes of obtaining credit; or

     (b) Has not approved the report and will further provide notice:

          (1) Of any information which must be included for the report to be approved; and

          (2) That the authority of the board of trustees or governing body, as applicable, to authorize pupils to participate in a public or private internship for the purposes of obtaining credit is suspended until the State Board approves a revised report.

     3.  If the board of trustees or governing body, as applicable, is notified by the State Board that the report has not been approved, the board of trustees or governing body, as applicable, must revise and resubmit the report to the State Board not later than 6 weeks after receiving such notice.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R029-14, eff. 6-23-2014)

COLLEGE READINESS

     NAC 389.830  “College readiness” defined. (NRS 385.080)  As used in NAC 389.830 to 389.845, inclusive, “college readiness” means the demonstrated proficiency of a pupil who graduates from high school in this State to participate and succeed in an academic program which results in the completion of a degree from a postsecondary educational institution.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R041-10, eff. 6-30-2010)

     NAC 389.835  Standards for college readiness. (NRS 385.080, 385.110)  A pupil enrolled in a 4-year course work program in a high school in this State completes the standards for college readiness if the pupil:

     1.  Successfully completes the courses required for an advanced diploma pursuant to NAC 389.663; and

     2.  Successfully completes at least 2 years of course work in one world language or demonstrates proficiency to speak at least two languages.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R041-10, eff. 6-30-2010; A by R063-14, 10-24-2014)

     NAC 389.840  Indications of college readiness. (NRS 385.080)  The successful completion by a pupil of the standards for college readiness set forth in NAC 389.835 is a strong indication:

     1.  That the pupil is ready to participate successfully as a freshman who is enrolled in a postsecondary educational institution as a full-time student.

     2.  That the pupil has:

     (a) Attained high academic achievement in the subject areas required for an advanced diploma pursuant to NAC 389.663;

     (b) Cognitive skills, including, without limitation, logical reasoning skills and linguistic expression skills, that are developed through achievement in the subject areas required for an advanced diploma pursuant to NAC 389.663;

     (c) Ancillary academic skills relating to study habits and self-direction;

     (d) An awareness of the expectations for behavior in an academic environment; and

     (e) Adequate test scores based upon the benchmark test scores established by the Board of Regents of the University of Nevada that should enable a pupil to avoid being placed in remedial classes as a postsecondary student.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R041-10, eff. 6-30-2010)

     NAC 389.845  Scope of college readiness. (NRS 385.080)  The standards for college readiness set forth in NAC 389.835 must be construed as prescribing the minimum level of academic attainment for the purposes of college readiness and must not be construed as:

     1.  Recommending that a pupil enroll in the minimum courses of study to demonstrate college readiness as set forth in NAC 389.835; or

     2.  Prescribing the standards for admission to an institution within the Nevada System of Higher Education or any other postsecondary educational institution.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R041-10, eff. 6-30-2010)

VETERANS

     NAC 389.850  Issuance of standard high school diploma to certain veterans who left high school to serve in Armed Forces. (NRS 385.080, 389.810)

     1.  To receive a standard high school diploma in accordance with the provisions of NRS 389.810, a veteran who satisfies the qualifications set forth in that section may submit to the Department of Veterans Services an application on a form prescribed for this purpose by the State Board of Education. If such a qualified veteran is deceased or mentally or physically unable, a family member or guardian of the veteran may submit an application on behalf of the veteran. Each such application must be accompanied by a copy of the certificate of honorable discharge issued to the veteran or a certified copy of the form DD214 issued to the veteran.

     2.  If a veteran submits an application pursuant to subsection 1 and the veteran:

     (a) Attended a secondary school in this State before leaving to serve in the Armed Forces of the United States, the application must list the name and location of the Nevada secondary school the veteran attended; or

     (b) Is a current resident of this State but did not attend a secondary school in this State, the application must be accompanied by an affidavit:

          (1) Affirming that the veteran attended a secondary school before leaving to serve in the Armed Forces of the United States; and

          (2) Listing the name and location of that secondary school.

     3.  If a family member or guardian of a veteran submits an application pursuant to subsection 1, the application must be accompanied by an affidavit affirming to the best of his or her knowledge that the veteran:

     (a) Attended a secondary school in this State before leaving to serve in the Armed Forces of the United States and listing the name and location of that Nevada secondary school; or

     (b) Was a resident of this State at the time of his or her death or incapacitation and left a secondary school to serve in the Armed Forces of the United States, including the name and location of that secondary school.

     4.  Upon determination that an application is complete and is accompanied by the material required by subsection 1 and subsection 2 or 3, as applicable, the Department of Veterans Services will forward the application to the appropriate school district on the veteran’s behalf.

     5.  Upon receipt of an application approved pursuant to subsection 4, a school district may issue a standard high school diploma to the veteran. Such a diploma may be presented to the veteran, or the family member or guardian of the veteran, as applicable:

     (a) During a graduation ceremony regularly conducted in that school district;

     (b) During a special ceremony conducted in that school district for veterans; or

     (c) By mailing the diploma to the veteran, or his or her family member or guardian, as applicable.

     (Added to NAC by Bd. of Education by R098-03, eff. 1-27-2004)